c# pdfsharp fill pdf form : Fill in pdf form reader control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser HTML5-Case-Studies-full6-part1078

CS5: 5
Figure 3. Preparing content in the e-Lecture Framework. 
4.  Impact of this Work 
PowerPoint slides are widely used in the traditional teaching and learning environment. The 
HTML5-based e-Lecture Framework provides an easy method to convert PowerPoint files to a 
Web version that can be directly published on existing Web servers. This solution will 
encourage more lecturers and teachers to carry out their plans to use existing teaching material 
in an e-learning form.  
The HTML5-based e-Lecture Framework also provides a free solution for institutions to deploy 
low-cost e-learning materials quickly, with minimal training. Developers can use this open 
framework to create their own e-learning-authorising utilities or develop new plug-ins to 
enhance their e-lecture framework, such as integrating videos and animations into the e-lecture 
framework. 
In our case study, the Brewing Science section at the University of Nottingham has used the 
framework to produce its e-lectures in a real teaching environment. Lecturers are happy to 
record the voice-overs and type transcripts for themselves. The e-learning providers then place 
all their teaching content into the framework and publish the final e-lectures directly into the 
WebCT modules. Students can then view the e-lectures directly along with other e-learning 
content in the WebCT environment (screenshots are shown in Figure 4). Staff are very satisfied 
with this solution and have declared themselves willing to introduce the e-Lecture Framework to 
other colleagues in the University.  
Fill in pdf form reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
export excel to pdf form; extract table data from pdf to excel
Fill in pdf form reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to save pdf form data in reader; exporting pdf form to excel
CS5: 6
Figure 4. Screenshots of final e-lectures in the WebCT environment. 
5.  Challenges 
Some difficulties were encountered during the development. The first was choosing a suitable 
audio format for Web delivery. According to some HTML5 technology rresources such as 
HTML5 test Web site
93
and ScriptJunkie Web site
94
, support for HTML5 audio formats varies 
considerably across browsers
95
. Currently, there is no common audio format that is supported 
by all HTML5-enabled browsers. We chose AAC- and Vorbis-encoded audio formats in that the 
AAC audio is supported by Chrome, Safari and Internet Explorer 9, while OGG audio is 
supported by Firefox and Opera. Using these two audio formats can satisfy the great majority of 
current popular HTML5-enabled browsers. Another possible audio format to choose is MP3. We 
chose not to use MP3 format as the AAC format demonstrates greater sound quality and 
transparency than MP3 for files coded at the same bit rate
96
.  
93
The HTML5 test - How well does your browser support HTML5?,  http://html5test.com/ 
94
Script Junkie, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/scriptjunkie 
95
Native Audio with HTML5. Script Junkiehttp://msdn.microsoft.com/en-
us/scriptjunkie/hh527168 
96
Wikipedia, Advanced Audio Coding term, 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Audio_Coding and Apple Support article, 
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2947?viewlocale=en_US 
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
how to fill out a pdf form with reader; extract data from pdf table
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
A professional PDF form filler control able to be integrated in Visual Studio .NET WinForm and fill in PDF form use C# language.
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; how to fill out pdf forms in reader
CS5: 7
The HTML5 audio DOM object performed differently across various browsers, too. In our 
development, we found that in Safari the audio object fires the “ended” event only once, 
although in Mobile Safari and Chrome the audio object can fire the “ended” event every time it 
finishes an audio play session. Therefore, we have to detect the “timeupdate” event to 
provide the play-slides-continuously function.  
During the development, we also found some potential bugs in newly released browsers, such 
as Firefox 6 and 7. In our case, Firefox 6 and 7 for Windows cannot get a proper 
audio.duration 
value that can be triggered by the audio
“loadeddata” event (the value i
always 
NaN
) when audios are encoded in a VBR (variable bitrate) configuration.  However, in 
Firefox 6 and 7 for Mac OS X, the code 
audio.duration 
works fine for VBR-encoded OGG 
audio files. So we have to restrict the OGG audio encoding method to the CBR (constant 
bitrate) setting only, in order to achieve greater compatibility. 
6.  Lessons Learnt 
During the development process we set up a standard to produce e-lectures. The framework is 
easy to use, even for less experienced e-learning providers wishing to create e-lectures from 
original PowerPoint presentations. But for those who have never produced e-learning materials 
before, the Framework is still difficult to use. Consequently, only providing a framework is not 
enough. A user-friendly e-learning tool based on this framework is more important for less 
technically experienced content producers. Therefore, in the next stage of our work, we will 
develop an application based on the e-Lecture Framework. We hope the application can prompt 
more and more inexperienced teachers and lecturers to deliver their lectures over the Web. 
7.  Conclusions 
This case study represents a trial of using cutting-edge Web technologies in the Higher 
Education sector. In our case we developed the HTML5-based e-Lecture Framework, which 
was applied in a real e-lecture production situation by the Brewing Science section at the 
University of Nottingham. The final result confirms that the HTML5 and related open 
technologies are ready to be widely used in the current e-learning environment. In some cases, 
such as delivering e-learning materials to mobile platforms, HTML5 will most likely prove the 
best choice at the moment. The HTML5-related technologies offer developers more 
opportunities and also bring greater flexibility to e-learning clients.  
On the other hand, HTML5 is still a developing technology. A cross-browser standard for 
HTML5 remains to be established. Meanwhile, some older browsers like Internet Explorer 6, 7 
and 8 still retain considerable market share. This situation makes Web development more 
complex. We have to balance the use of new technologies against compatibility with older 
systems during the development period. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
pdf form save in reader; flatten pdf form in reader
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
extract data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf using java
CS5: 8
Appendix 1:  HTML5 Technologies Used 
The following HTML5 and related technologies were used in the example in this case study: 
HTML5 audio DOM object will be used to load, play and control voice-overs 
AJAX technology will be used to load slides information and transcripts 
Client-end user agent strings will be used to create the auto-adaptive user interface 
The HTML5 touch DOM object will be used to create the  user interface for iOS 
platforms 
HTML5 device orientation events will be used in designing the user interface for iOS 
platforms 
CSS3 technology will be used to design the HTML5 user interface 
Appendix 2:  Notes on Content 
The e-Lecture resources are available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~sbzqw/electure/ and 
described below. A demonstration is available at 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~sbzqw/electure/demo  
Details of the content of these resources is given below: 
Content of e-Lecture Framework 
index.html, html5.css, html5.js 
An HTML5 interface for desktop platform 
index_iPad.html, ios.css, ipad.js 
An HTML5 interface for iPad platform 
index_iPhone.html, ios.css, iphone.js 
An HTML5 interface for iPhone platform 
index_fl.html, index.swf, 
AC_RunActiveContent.js 
A Flash interface for HTML5 unsupported environments 
Shared resources such as 
touchScroll.js, btn_playPause.png, 
btn_slides.png, etc. 
Including image assets, SWF player skin file and 
shared JavaScript files 
Slides folder 
An empty folder to store slides files 
Audio folder 
An empty folder to store voice-overs files 
Text folder 
An empty folder to store transcripts files 
Content of supporting documents and utilities (in the “_help and tools” folder)
User Guide (UserGuide.html) 
An HTML format of user guide including the framework 
overview, a step-by-step workflow that helps users to 
prepare e-lecture content, technical details and content 
standard list, etc. 
XML Code Maker (getXMLCode.html) 
An HTML/JavaScript-based tool that helps users to 
generate the XML data of all slides information 
Slides Exporting Tool (exportJPG.bas) 
A VBA macro that helps users to convert PowerPoint 
presentations to slides images in a proper size and 
format 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
pdf data extraction; vb extract data from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
pdf data extractor; edit pdf form in reader
CS6: 1
HTML5 Case Study 6:
3Dactyl: Using WebGL to Represent 
Human Movement in 3D
Document details 
Author : 
Stephen Gray 
Date: 
21 May 2012 
Version: 
V1.0 
Rights 
This work has been published under a Creative Commons attribution-
sharealike 2.0 licence.  
About 
This case study is one of a series of HTML5 case studies funded by the JISC 
which provide examples of development work in use of HTML5 to support a 
range of scholarly activities. 
Acknowledgements 
UKOLN is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher and Further 
Education Funding Councils, as well as by project funding from the JISC and the European 
Union. UKOLN also receives support from the University of Bath where it is based. 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
pdf data extraction open source; extract data from pdf file to excel
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
save data in pdf form reader; export pdf form data to excel
Contents 
1
About This Case Study 
1
Target Audience 
1
What Is Covered 
1
What Is Not Covered 
1
2
Use Case 
2
Background 
2
3
Solution 
3
Motion capture 
3
Motion Re-targeting 
3
Re-presenting Performance as X3D 
3
4
Challenges 
5
Quality of motion capture 
5
Use of surrogate CGI avatars vs. 3D 'scanning' 
5
Delivery 
5
5
Things Done Differently / Lessons Learnt 
6
6
Conclusions 
6
3D as Evidence of Research 
6
3D as an Archival Document 
6
3D 
as Student ‘Sketchbook’
6
Plans for Future Development 
6
Appendix 1:  HTML5 Technologies Used 
7
CS6: 1 
1.  About This Case Study 
This case study covers the development of 3Dactyl, a hardware and software configuration, 
which is intended to record and represent the physical movements of an individual online in 
three dimensions, for scholarly research purposes. Resulting 3D scenes (as an XML document) 
are embeddable within a standard Web page or VLE. Examples of such 3D footage might be 
various forms of performance art, e.g. dance, drama or even sport where the performance of 
play strokes can be carefully analysed. Within the same constraints of space, surgical or 
therapeutic procedures would be another feasible use. When such scenes are viewed on future 
versions of browsers, they will not, typically, require special plug-ins to use the 3D footage 
interactively.  
The 3Dactyl Project is still under development, the aim is to develop a system which is 
reproducible, configurable and usable by the non-technical specialist at minimal cost. Future 
versions will aim to automate much of the workflow, which for now has to be carried out 
manually. 
Research groups from medicine, sports science and archaeology are beginning to explore the 
presentation of research data as online 3D visualisations. New precedent projects demonstrate 
a clear need for spatially accurate information, presented over time in a simple and accessible 
way. 
The particular focus for the current project has been the capture and representation of human 
motion within arts research. For example, the tracking of human motion in the context of 
dramatic action, stage behaviour, etc. To achieve this, we have worked closely with the 
University of Bristol’s Department of Drama: Theatre, Film, Television
97
Target Audience 
This case study will be of interest to creative arts researcher-practitioners within Higher 
Education or similar research institutions. Although the configuration and operation of the 
3Dactyl system currently does require a degree of technical engagement it is being specifically 
developed by the 3Dactyl team for use by arts researchers who are not IT specialists. 
It is hoped that those responsible for supporting performance-related research activities such 
as: technical theatre staff, assessors of practice-as-research, keepers of performance archives 
and e-learning staff responsible for arts faculty VLE pages will also find this case study useful 
and may wish to reproduce the workflows described below.  
What Is Covered 
The case study divides the development of 3Dactyl into three phases: 
1.  Motion capture 
2.  Re-targeting motion data to a standardised digital avatar 
3.  Representing the avatar with real-world motion applied in an interactive 3D form, via a 
browser  
The hardware, software and workflow steps for each phase are described in this case study. 
What Is Not Covered 
The current incarnation of 3Dactyl requires a 3D avatar model to be used in order to ‘carry’ t
he 
3D data which has been captured. Many suitable 3D models are available on the web under 
Creative Commons licences. Use of custom avatars is possible and has exciting creative 
possibilities; but CGI modelling, rigging and skinning is beyond the scope of this document. 
97
University of Bristol: Department of Drama: Theatre, Film, Television, http://www.bristol.ac.uk/drama/
CS6: 2 
2.  Use Case 
In addition to enriching our cultural heritage sector, performance, as research, underpins the 
scholarly record and is commonly used, reused and reinterpreted by subsequent researcher-
practitioners as the basis for new works. The target audience for this system is the 
undergraduate through to a post-doctoral researcher studying in a performance-related 
discipline (e.g. theatre, live art or dance).  
Locally, the system is intended to be used by undergraduates studying performance within the 
University of Bristol's Department of Drama to build 3D 'sketchbooks'. 3Dactyl is presented as a 
solution which will permit 3D recordings to be made, studied and ultimately archived for 
research purposes.  
Students, researchers and keepers of performance study collections recognise both the 
desirability and the considerable challenge of 'preserving' live performance. Often a single video 
recording is used to represent a work which may have taken months or even years to develop. 
As ‘by
-
products’ of the creative process, these videos may be of very poor quality. Problems are 
associated with using any single method of documentation, but video has an inherent limitation: 
it is essentially a 2D technique attempting to describe actions in 3D space. For disciplines 
where correct execution is important, such as dance, established visual recording methods 
frequently produce documents which are entirely unfit for research or teaching purposes.  
42 UK Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and similar institutions put forward research for 
assessment under the Drama, Dance and Performing Arts heading of the 2008 RAE. The 
University of Bristol Department of Drama: Theatre, Film, Television was ranked 6th among 
them. The University is also home to the Theatre Collection, a special study collection and 
museum which holds the second largest performance-related archive in the UK, after the 
Victoria and Albert Museum. 
After conducting several successful collaborative projects with the Department of Drama the 
3Dactyl team recognised the need for an inexpensive and easy-to-use system which could be 
deployed to record performance in an interactive 3D format. 
The system should be unobtrusive (for example, not require special markers to be worn during 
recording) and sufficiently accurate, as well as be able to produce documents in a format which 
can be accessed via a browser without the need for dedicated plug-ins. The solution will allow 
students and researchers of performance to interact with 3D representations in real time and to 
examine the event from any conceivable perspective, for example, from behind, above or at 
very close range. This need ruled out the use of domestic 3D TV technologies, which record 
and display stereoscopic rather than truly 3D representations, in much the same way as 
conventional cinematic projections differ from 3D vision performances.  
If possible, documents produced by the system should be in an open source format in order to 
meet the collection policies of archives such as Bristol’s Theatre Collection Museum
98
which is 
the custodian of much of the UK’s performance documentation.
Background 
Tools which facilitate online 3D representations have been around for some time. Introduced in 
the early 1990s, VRML (Virtual Reality Mark-up Language) was limited by insufficient 
bandwidths, processor speeds and the need to employ browser plug-ins which proved difficult 
to configure.  Despite these issues, VRML ultimately proved to be a successful, open 
technology and spawned the newer X3D format. The X3D ISO standard, used by the 3Dactyl 
system, offers the ability to encode a 3D scene using an XML dialect. Supporters of X3D are 
currently striving to make it the de facto standard for interactive 3D Web content.  
X3D, coupled with advances in WebGL (Web-based Graphics Library) and intermediary 
technologies 
mean many of today’s browsers are already capable of displaying 
interactive 3D 
data without the need for plug-ins, although this functionality is rarely used. 
The online re-presentation of human motion is only possible if that motion has been accurately 
captured, to achieve this, the current project makes use of the Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive 
peripheral, primarily intended as a controller for the Xbox 360. The release by Microsoft of the 
98
University of Bristol Theatre Collection, http://www.bris.ac.uk/theatrecollection/
CS6: 3 
Kinect SDK
99
has facilitated the development of many Mocap (motion capture) applications 
which would, only a short time ago have been financially prohibitive for the majority of academic 
researchers or even modestly funded research groups. 
3.  Solution 
Motion capture 
The project uses the (sub-£100) Kinect, a device intended 
primarily as a controller for the Xbox 360 game console. 
Motion capture also requires a PC, with OpenNI framework, 
NITE middleware and Brekel Kinect Drivers (all either open 
source or freely available). In the current version of 3Dactyl, 
the Brekel application is used as the central interface for 
motion capture. After launching the application, users stand in 
front of the Kinect device and ensure their entire body is 
visible. The human form is recognised automatically. Note 
however that recognition fails if a user's face is not visible to 
the device or if the user stands too close to large objects. In 
order to 'lock on' to a skeleton, the user must adopt a standard 
'Psi-Pose' (see Figure 1). 
The Brekel application allows either visible light or infra-red 
light to be used for tracking and this option for users can make a difference to the quality of the 
outcome, depending on the lighting conditions of a room. Loose clothing or other people in the 
device's view can also make calibration fail (although tracking of multiple skeletons is possible 
and will shortly be implemented). When tracking starts an overlay of joints is visible in the 
viewport. The user (or an operator) chooses where the mocap data should be saved to and 
starts the capture process. The system begins to write a Biovision Hierarchy (BVH) character 
animation file, which contains the motion data, i.e., successive captures of the human 
movements which are numbered incrementally. Limitations to motion capture include a 
restricted 'stage' area within which the subject can move, as well as the requirement that the 
subject’s 
entire body remains within those limited boundaries throughout the entire take. 
The size of this area depends greatly on local lighting conditions, but 10 square feet of floor 
space can be expected. Another limitation is the inability to track fine-grained movements (such 
as finger movements or facial expressions), though this aspect is improving with successive 
generations of tracking software. 
Motion Re-targeting 
Once motion is captured in .BHV format it can be applied to a surrogate avatar. The avatar does 
not have to have the same proportions as the performer.  
Nor does it have to be humanoid. Several 3D modelling packages allow the retargeting of .BHV 
data onto an existing CGI model. We typically elect to do this via the open source modelling 
software, Blender. The same process is possible in packages such as Maya or 3DS Max. This 
stage is fairly standard and many guides exist which cover the application of .BHV data within 
specific modelling packages. One advantage of using Blender is the package's native ability to 
export a scene as X3D format, though both MAYA and 3DS Max can export as X3D via plug-ins 
(RawKee and BSContact, respectively).  
Re-presenting Performance as X3D 
3Dactyl relies upon three key technologies in order to deliver 3D content via a Web browser: 
X3D, 3DOM and WebGL. 
X3D
100
is the ISO standard XML-based file format for representing 3D computer graphics. X3D 
supports many of the same features as its predecessor, VRML, including: several different 
options for navigating a scene, the ability to loop animated elements and clickable (onclick) 3D 
99
Microsoft Kinect SDK for Developers, http://kinectforwindows.org/ 
100
Web3D Consortium: X3D and Related Specifications, 
http://www.web3d.org/x3d/specifications/ 
Figure 1. The psi-pose 
CS6: 4 
objects, used to initiate actions. We selected X3D for use within 3Dactyl as the format is already 
becoming integrated into the HTML5 standard. The HTML5 specification
101
already references 
X3D for declarative3D scenes. However, a specific integration model is not suggested. 
<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html> 
<head> 
<meta http-equiv='Content-Type' content='text/html;charset=utf-
8'></meta> 
<title>X3DOM example 
</title> 
<link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' 
href='http://www.x3dom.org/x3dom/src/x3dom.css'></link> 
</head> 
<body> 
<h1>X3DOM example 
</h1> 
<p> 
<x3d id='someUniqueId' showStat='false' showLog='false' x='0px' 
y='0px' width='400px' height='400px'> 
<scene DEF='scene'> 
<worldInfo info='"X3D sample created using the 3Dactyl 
system"' title='climb1'></worldInfo> 
<navigationInfo type='"EXAMINE" "ANY"'></navigationInfo> 
Figure 2. Code snippet from a finalised X3D file. 
X3DOM
102
is the DOM-based HTML5/X3D integration model we use, X3DOM integrates X3D 
data with HTML5 using only WebGL and JavaScript.
This is achieved by directly mapping live 
DOM elements to an X3D model in a way very similar to the way SVG is used with 2D graphics. 
WebGL
103
displays the X3D scenes within the browser. WebGL uses the canvas element and 
provides a 3D graphics API. Many browsers which support HTML5 also have support for 
WebGL (see Table 1). 
WebGL browser support 
Mozilla Firefox 
Support enabled by default since version 4.0 
Google Chrome  Support enabled by default since version 9 
Safari 
Support disabled by default since 5.1 
Opera 
Only supported in development build 11.50 
Internet Explorer  Works via IEWebGL plug-in. No official plans to support 
WebGL without plug-ins. 
Table 1: WebGL browser support. 
Encoded as HTML5, X3D scenes can either be associated with other, non-3D content, or 
remain independent. 
101
HTML5: A vocabulary and associated APIs for HTML and XHTML, 
http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/ 
102
X3DOM, http://www.x3dom.org/ 
103
WebGL - OpenGL ES 2.0 for the Web,  http://www.khronos.org/webgl/ 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested