c# axacropdf example : Extract data from pdf Library SDK class asp.net .net azure ajax HTML5_Case_Studies_full5-part1099

CS4: 3 
embedded into the document via AJAX 
76
both as a complete list and as individual references 
within the text 
77
Although the BibServer example makes use of modern open Web standards, it is not explicitly 
reliant on HTML5. However, we can investigate further. 
Data Anywhere 
The critical aspect of the BibServer software is that it is built to assume that data is and should 
be stored and available from anywhere 
it is not designed as a tool for collecting up and 
controlling all this data, either technologically or legally. Whilst BibServer can provide a service 
to convert and store datasets, it leaves users free to present that data anywhere they wish 
on 
any departmental Web page, or on any course materials Web page. For example, a student can 
embed a browsable interface to their collection of references directly in their self-published 
research article on a Web site. 
In addition to retrieving and operating on data from any source, and to embed the output of 
those operations on any web document, we can use HTML5 standards to embed the metadata 
itself in a page. 
Embedded Metadata 
The previous example demonstrates references from a remote collection being used within the 
text 
all the reference links, and the reference list at the bottom of the piece, are inserted via 
jQuery. However, with HTML5 metadata standards such as scholarly HTML
78
and 
schema.org
79
, the collection itself can be embedded within a document. By writing a parser for 
the recommended version of this embedded metadata, we can extract a collection from a 
document into a BibServer instance, and, in return, provide the embeddable references and 
faceted browse. 
Sam Adams investigated the metadata standards available in HTML5 and made an example as 
part of his case study that could ingest PloS articles 
80
and display them as HTML5 with 
embedded metadata
81
. His example shows a citation list embedded in a document in the 
schema.org format: 
<
p itemtype="http://schema.org/ScholarlyArticle" itemscope="" 
itemprop="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/cites"> 
<a name="pone.0022199-deQueiroz1"></a>1. 
<span itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" itemscope="" 
itemprop="author"><span itemprop="name">de Queiroz, K</span></span> 
(1998) "<span itemprop="name">The general concept of species, species 
criteria, and the process of speciation: a conceptual unification and 
terminological recommendations.</span>"  
<em itemprop="http://example.net/journalTitle">Endless Forms: Species 
and Speciation</em>  
edited by <span itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" itemscope="" 
itemprop="editor"><span itemprop="name">Howard, DJ</span></span>; 
<span itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" itemscope="" 
itemprop="editor"><span itemprop="name">Berlocher, SH</span></span> 
<span itemprop="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/pageStart"> 57</span>-
<span itemprop="http://purl.org/ontology/bibo/pageEnd"> 75</span>. 
</p> 
Figure 1. Sample citation in schema.org format. 
This embedded metadata forms part of the Document Object Model (DOM), and as such it can 
be easily parsed out using Javascript / jQuery and converted to JSON: 
76
AJAX explanation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajax_%28programming%29 
77
A document with embedded references, http://cottagelabs.com/phd 
78
Scholarly HTML, http://scholarlyhtml.org/ 
79
Schema.org, http://schema.org/ 
80
Public Library of Science, http://plos.org/ 
81
Sam Adams (2011), HTML5 App, http://html5app.bluefen.co.uk/ 
Extract data from pdf - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract data from pdf; extract pdf form data to xml
Extract data from pdf - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf form to excel; pdf data extraction
CS4: 4 
"citekey":"pone.0022199-deQueiroz1", 
"editor":["Howard, DJ","Berlocher, SH"], 
"author":["de Queiroz, K"], 
"title":"The general concept of species, species criteria, and 
the process of speciation: a conceptual unification and 
terminological recommendations.", 
"journal":"Endless Forms: Species and Speciation", 
"pages":"57 to 75" 
Figure 2. schema.org metadata parsed to JSON. 
With the metadata readily available
82
, it can be submitted to bibliographic metadata services for 
use in collection management, faceted browse, and visualisation generation. 
Visualising the Data 
With programmatic access to a collection, it is possible to increase the impact and usability of 
the collection considerably via a graphical user interface to the dataset, allowing for real-time 
display and manipulation of the dataset. This functionality becomes available by utilising open 
standards for embedding the metadata and remotely querying services that can act on the 
metadata collections. 
By querying the same API as the faceted browse front end and retrieving the required 
information about the collection, SVG visualisations can be prepared using the D3 Javascript 
library. This visualisation can also be embedded within the document. 
Figure 3. Visualisation generated from bibliographic metadata embedded in a Web page. 
82
Sample schema.org metadata retrieved from html5app and converted to JSON, 
http://test.cottagelabs.com/html5/records.json 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
vb extract data from pdf; extract data from pdf to excel
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
extract data from pdf using java; pdf data extractor
CS4: 5 
It is possible to alter the visualisation based on search parameters 
it is not a pre-processed 
image, but an embedded representation of a current view on a dataset
83
. Although it has not 
been demonstrated in this case study, these visual representations can be further enhanced to 
work as access methods onto the data too 
for example, discovering the most popular author 
via the visualisation could trigger faceting of the dataset on that author name, and so on. Work 
into this is ongoing on the BibServer Project. 
4.  Impact 
By combining these examples it is possible to provide an enhanced user experience and 
improved accessibility and disseminability by making data easier to discover and use. 
To take advantage of this, all that is required is the addition of a few lines of Javascript to a 
page. To demonstrate, an example has been created that performs the following: 
Take a sample page with embedded metadata from the HTML5 app created by Sam 
Adams 
Parse the page for embedded metadata 
Submit the metadata to the remote BibSoup service for indexing and collection 
creation 
Query the collection for facet information 
Generate a visualisation using D3 of the facet information 
Embed the visualisation as an SVG on the page 
This is available to view at http://test.cottagelabs.com/html5 
84
If Sam Adams wished to add this functionality directly to his HTML5 app  [4] or if others wanted 
similar functionality on their Web pages, it would require the addition of only a few lines of 
Javascript and suitable embedded metadata. 
This solution makes use of HTML5, CSS, Javascript and jQuery to provide an example of what 
is possible now. It is already possible to build and manage an authoring and distribution tool for 
education and research, and standards such as HTML5 bring us closer to making such a tool 
available to the diverse audience of people involved in the education and research community. 
With sufficient resolve, we could abandon restrictive licensing of research output and move 
instead to a model of open scholarship supported by open source software built on open web 
standards, saving billions for the research and education community and making  its valuable 
output accessible to all. To do so, we need to overcome only a few problems. 
5.  Challenges 
Cross-browser Compatibility 
Although HTML5 has been in development for a number of years, adoption by the major 
browser vendors is recent and patchy. Whereas recent versions of Firefox have supported 
HTML5 
85
, Internet Explorer in particular (and as usual) was slow to support HTML5, although 
Microsoft are now officially backing the standard and newer versions should meet 
specifications. As Internet Explorer is still the most popular browser, despite being the least 
standards-compliant, some trickery is required to support HTML5 on older but nonetheless 
common versions. Table 1 below details the recent versions of most common browsers with 
which this study’s solution is compatible. 
83
Example generation of visualisations via D3 Javascript library from records stored on 
BibSoup, http://test.cottagelabs.com/d3 
84
Example parsing metadata from Sam Adams HTML5 app output, submission to remote 
BibSoup service, query and visualisation, http://test.cottagelabs.com/html5
85
Firefox announces HTML5 support, http://hacks.mozilla.org/2010/05/firefox-4-the-html5-
parser-inline-svg-speed-and-more/ 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; extract pdf form data to excel
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; how to fill pdf form in reader
CS4: 6 
Browser 
Version 
Working? 
Firefox 
7.0.1 
Yes 
Opera 
11.10 
No 
AJAX error 
Safari 
5.0.4 
Yes 
Internet Explorer 
8.0.6001.18702 
No 
AJAX access denied error 
Chrome 
13.0 
Yes 
Table 1. Compatibility of solution with recent versions of common browsers. 
The errors listed in the table above could most likely be resolved on these browsers, and are 
unlikely to have arisen specifically due to errors in HTML5, but, rather, due to differences in how 
browsers parse Javascript, perform cross-domain requests, and so on. Further work will 
continue on this. This demonstrates the difficulties that should be considered when using these 
or any new technologies and standards 
adherence and purposeful non-adherence begin to 
compete with one another as successful strategies. 
Of course, a great advantage of open standards and open source development is that there are 
many other people in the world tackling the same problems. Thus, it is easy to find readily 
available solutions to such problems, such as HTML5 shim 
86
and Modernizr 
87
Reliance on Javascript 
Javascript used to be considered secondary to the function of web pages and making a page 
that relied on Javascript was considered bad form. However, it is now virtually impossible to find 
a user that does not have Javascript enabled, as all browsers fully support it. Whilst it is 
possible to turn off Javascript, this is most likely only going to happen in the case of a user who 
understands the impact turning it off will have. The only exception to this is disability 
where a 
user may be visiting a Web page via screen-reading software for example, lack of Javascript 
support can still cause problems. Thus we must be careful to balance increased functionality 
with graceful degradation 
where Javascript supports enhancements for the typical user, the 
page should still provide useful content for users accessing it via alternative technologies. 
Flash, SVG or Canvas 
There are examples of HTML5 being used by technologies and businesses that rely on their 
online functionality to work appropriately across all browsers Shepherd, [6]. Whereas Flash is 
an old standard, it is proprietary and has suffered from the fact that content embedded in a 
Flash object is removed from the rest of the document. Since Apple, for one, has refused to 
support Flash on its devices, directly embedded visualisations are more appealing. 
Staff at Slideshare recently completed a large project to convert their online presentations to 
HTML5, successfully overcoming many compatibility problems in the process (see SlideShare 
Engineering Blog [7]). They are now moving all their legacy Flash presentations to HTML5, but 
will continue to support legacy formats where necessary. However this commitment, along with 
some other impressive examples of what can be achieved 
88
89
, show that the move is certainly 
towards the HTML5 method of direct embedding. Debate continues as to whether SVG or 
Canvas is most appropriate 
90
, and to some extent, it depends on application 
and there are 
already ways to convert between them 
91
. This is an issue to keep under observation. 
86
HTML5 shim, http://code.google.com/p/html5shim/ 
87
Modernizr, http://www.modernizr.com/ 
88
Embedded presentations,  http://sozi.baierouge.fr/wiki/doku.php?id=en:welcome 
89
Embedded draw, http://bomomo.com/ 
90
SVG vs Canvas debate, http://stackoverflow.com/questions/568136/svg-vs-canvas-where-is-
the-web-world-going-towards 
91
SVG to Canvas conversion,  http://plindenbaum.blogspot.com/2009/11/tool-converting-svg-to-
canvas%5F22.html 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
pdf data extraction open source; extract table data from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
extract pdf data to excel; online form pdf output
CS4: 7 
The Meaning of Open 
The most valuable thing we can learn from open Web standards is the open part; it is not 
impossible to build a working technology and community around a freely available resource, it is 
not impossible to disseminate our research output freely to everyone in the world (bar the costs 
of delivery itself); but achieving this requires change and effort. 
6.  Conclusions 
HTML5 and open web standards are already being put to good use. The ethos of open 
standards is highly appropriate to the education and research community, and the only 
complexity in using them to their full advantage is that of poor adherence to the standards. 
Therefore, where a particular software / technology creator deliberately fails to implement those 
standards appropriately, it should be recognised as detrimental to the purpose of our 
community. 
Given that the Internet was invented by a researcher to make it easier to disseminate research 
outputs and given the cost of traditional (and less functional) publication, it should be obvious 
that supporting open web standards is absolutely crucial to the future of the academic 
community. The risk represented by facing the aforementioned compatibility challenges is 
nothing compared to that of failing to support these standards in future. 
References 
[1]  Final product post: Open bibliography. Project report. [Web log message]. MacGillivray, M. 
(2011). http://openbiblio.net/2011/06/30/final-product-post-open-bibliography/ 
[2] HTML is the new HTML5. The WHATWG Blog. Hickson, I. 2011. http://blog.whatwg.org/html-is-
the-new-html5 
[3] HTML5: A vocabulary and associated APIs for HTML and XHTML. Editor's Draft,  January 10, 
2012. W3C. (2012)  http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html 
[4] Semantics and Metadata: Machine-Understandable Documents. Adams, S. 2012. HTML5 Case 
Studies, UKOLN, University of Bath. 
[5] Conventions and Guidelines for Scholarly HTML5 Documents. HTML5 Case Studies, Sefton, P. 
2012. UKOLN, University of Bath. 
[6] Using HTML5 to transform WordPress' TwentyTen theme. Smashing Magazine. Shepherd, R. 
22 February 2011. http://wp.smashingmagazine.com/2011/02/22/using-html5-to-transform-
wordpress-twentyten-theme/ 
[7] SlideShare ditches Flash for HTML5. SlideShare Engineering Blog. 27 September 27 2011, By 
JON [Web log message]. http://engineering.slideshare.net/2011/09/slideshare-ditches-flash-for-
html5/ 
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract
can reader edit pdf forms; extract table data from pdf to excel
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF with C#.NET Library. C#.NET Demo Code: Auto Fill-in Field Data to PDF in C#.NET.
extract data from pdf file to excel; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
HTML5 Case Study 5:
The HTML5
-
Based e
-
Lecture 
Framework
Document details 
Author : 
Qingqi Wang 
Date: 
21 May 2012 
Version: 
V1.0 
Rights 
This work has been published under a Creative Commons attribution-
sharealike 2.0 licence.  
Notes: 
Related Web site - http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~sbzqw/electure 
About 
This case study is one of a series of HTML5 case studies funded by the JISC 
which provide examples of development work in use of HTML5 to support a 
range of scholarly activities. 
Acknowledgements 
UKOLN is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher and Further 
Education Funding Councils, as well as by project funding from the JISC and the European 
Union. UKOLN also receives support from the University of Bath where it is based. 
Contents 
1
About This Case Study 
1
Target Audience 
1
What Is Covered 
1
What Is Not Covered 
1
2
Use Case 
1
3
Solution 
2
4
Impact of this Work 
5
5
Challenges 
6
6
Lessons Learnt 
7
7
Conclusions 
7
Appendix 1:  HTML5 Technologies Used 
8
Appendix 2:  Notes on Content 
8
CS5: 1
1.  About This Case Study 
The HTML5-based e-Lecture Framework is a part of the HTML5 Case Studies funded by JISC 
and managed by UKOLN. This case study focuses on providing a solution to allow e-lecture 
creators to convert their Microsoft PowerPoint presentations into online lectures in a simple and 
quick fashion. The resulting e-lecture can be easily deployed on an existing Web server and 
delivered to both desktop and mobile platforms.  
Target Audience 
This case study has been produced for lecturers and supporting staff who plan to deliver 
courses to the Web via series of e-lectures. The e-Lecture Framework is designed to provide a 
solution to convert PowerPoint presentations to an e-lecture format, which can be directly 
published on Web. The obvious benefits of this framework are its compatibility, flexibility, ease 
of use and zero-cost. The framework is free and open. No additional software is needed. No 
additional configuration is needed for the existing servers. No additional techniques are required 
for e-lecture providers to learn. The HTML5-based e-Lecture Framework can easily port the 
existing PowerPoint slides to mobile devices. The latter capability is of significant, as it will 
enable students to access learning in their preferred device format, thereby assuring they do not 
fall behind.  This will in turn assure student retention and attract tuition in the first year and 
beyond.  The ease of being able to watch and listen to an e-lecture on a bus or in a café using 
their handsets is something students have come to expect. Institutions which do not make this 
provision risk falling behind in the competition to offer students a high level of service. 
What Is Covered 
The topics covered in the case study include: 
1.  Development of an HTML5-based auto-adaptive e-lecture interface 
2.  Providing a framework for course providers to convert PowerPoint slides to e-lectures 
3.  Setting up a standard format of e-lecture content 
4.  Providing solutions/utilities that can help course providers to generate well-formed e-
lecture content 
5.  Providing technical details of the framework for further development 
What Is Not Covered 
Topics the case study will not cover are: 
Providing a binary application that can generate e-lectures directly from PowerPoint 
files based on the framework - the case study is aimed at setting up a framework that 
can be reused for further development. But the case study itself will not provide this 
kind of application. 
All related third-party utilities within the framework - the framework only provides a 
recommended list of the third-party utilities that are suitable for  preparing course 
content. 
2.  Use Case 
For many teachers and lecturers, migrating their teaching material to e-learning is a stony path 
to follow, however desirable. In order to deliver courses over the Internet, a great deal of original 
course content has to be reproduced to meet the requirements of online publication. One of the 
significant challenges they often encounter is moving non-Web-oriented lecture presentations 
on to the Web. To date, a common but effort-intensive solution has been for teachers to 
regenerate online content from their original presentations and render them suitable for access 
on a Web server. But the existing solutions all suffer from various limitations and failings: for 
example, the limited compatibility of the final e-lecture products among different browsers and 
devices. 
CS5: 2
In our case, we developed a new e-Lecture Framework at the request of the Brewing Science 
section
92
of the Division of Food Sciences at the University of Nottingham. The Brewing Science 
section has been delivering an e-learning-based MSc course since September 2006. E-lectures 
represent a very important component of the course’s online learning modules. Staff
have tried 
some commercial software like Microsoft Producer and Adobe Captivate to convert their 
PowerPoint slides to Web-based e-lectures, but they have discovered these tools cannot meet 
all their requirements.  For example, when using Microsoft Producer, the software can link slides 
with a teaching video and broadcast it via the Web, but the video transfer speed is very slow 
when a large video file meets a narrowband network environment. This is frustrating for 
students and teachers alike. In addition, those same students and teachers are currently 
obliged to use the Internet Explorer browser to access the final e-lectures, a hurdle which may 
occasion some, e.g., Linux and Mac users, a degree of inconvenience to the point of refusal.  
Adobe Captivate works better and it can deliver voice-overs with slides using Flash technology. 
This increases the transfer speed of the online content, but when they wanted to deliver the e-
lectures to mobile platforms, staff found the Flash Player for mobile systems performed poorly 
compared with the desktop version. As is well known, mobile platforms such as the iPhone and 
iPad do not support Flash. In addition, the high cost and the complexity of the commercial 
software can also represent an obstacle. Often lecturers and teachers have little time to learn to 
use new software; they simply want a tool they can use with minimal training. 
This situation prompted us to develop a new lightweight and easy-to-use e-lecture framework 
for them. The target system was designed to be an HTML5-based open framework, which 
integrates presentation slides, voice-overs and transcripts. For course providers, the framework 
encourages them to use familiar tools, such as Microsoft PowerPoint, Notepad, Sound 
Recorder, etc., to prepare e-lecture content. So, for example, a lecturer may wish to combine for 
students a series of diagrams demonstrating how a process gradually progresses, for instance 
soil erosion by flowing water. She has supplemented the series of diagrams with a voice-over 
commentary for each stage, for which she has also produced a transcript. In addition, she has 
created a summary of the different stages in a series of bullet points of short text, each badged 
with a small symbol to identify each distinct stage. She can prepare all this content using the 
software with which she is familiar, as she has been used to do; and then finally she can 
generate the e-lecture by placing the different types of content (slides images, voice-over 
audios and transcript texts) into the framework according to the straight-forward instructions. For 
remote learners, the framework provides a clear and user-friendly interface with intuitive 
navigation. It also allows learners to access the e-lecture content from different platforms. For e-
learning system administrators, the e-lecture framework is a lightweight component that can 
easily be added to an existing Web-based virtual learning environment (VLE). 
The members of the Brewing Science e-learning team have tried this newly developed 
framework to deliver several e-lectures. They are very interested in this framework as it 
simplifies the previous e-lecture production process quite considerably. Moreover, it represents 
in their view a very low-cost and efficient solution. Lecturers and course providers can continue 
to use the tools familiar to them to generate e-lecture content that meets the requirements of the 
framework. As a result, they do not need to spend too much time on learning new software 
skills. The quality of the resulting e-lectures is very good, even when delivered over different 
network conditions, such as Wifi and 3G networks. It is also easy for them to integrate the e-
lectures into their existing online learning modules under the WebCT environment. The Brewing 
Science team members were very satisfied with the e-Lecture Framework and decided to re-
convert all their e-lectures using this new e-Lecture Framework. 
3.  Solution 
The e-Lecture Framework was developed mainly through the use of HTML5 technologies. The 
old Flash technology was also used in environments which do not support HTML5. This hybrid 
solution makes the e-Lecture Framework compatible with almost all current popular platforms 
and browser environments, including Internet Explorer, version 6 and above, Firefox, version 6 
and above, Chrome, version 11 and above, Safari, version 4 and above, Opera, version 10 and 
above, and Mobile Safari on iPhone and iPad. The structure of the Framework was designed to 
contain two layers: the Core Data layer and the User Interface layer (see Figure 1). 
92
Brewing Science section of the Division of Food Sciences, http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ 
biosciences/divisions/food/research/groupsandteams/brewingscience.aspx 
CS5: 3
Figure 1. The draft structure of the e-Lecture Framework 
In the Core Data layer, there are three types of lecture content: slides, voice-overs and 
transcripts are stored in the related folders. An XML file is used to store all the slide information. 
In the User Interface layer, an auto-adaptive technology will be used to present the e-lecture 
content to different platforms. The client-end Web page will be able to detect the connecting 
platforms/browsers automatically, and switch to an HTML5 user interface for browsers that 
support HTML5 features or provide a Flash player-based user interface for browsers that do not 
support HTML5. 
In accordance with the above Framework design, the final e-Lecture Framework provides all 
required content as shown in Figure 2. The detailed table of content is shown in Appendix 2. 
Figure 2. Content provided in the e-Lecture Framework 
In order to meet the requirements of the Brewing Science e-learning team, the e-Lecture 
Framework was designed with following functions: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested