c# encrypt pdf : How to save a filled out pdf form in reader SDK control project winforms web page .net UWP import2-part1196

Paul Murrell
21
Height
Distance Apart
10
20
30
40
50
60
50
100
150
200
Figure 15: A statisticalplot produced inR using the lattice package, with an imported“flower”
image used as the plotting symbol. This is very similar to Figure8, but with a white border
added to each petal within each flower symbol.
The final element in an RGML file is a <summary> element with attributes recording the total
number of paths and bounding box information for the image.
The basic structure of an RGML file consisting of just a single <path> element is shown below
(this is the petal image from Section2.1).
<?xml version=
1.0
encoding=
ISO-8859-1
?>
<picture version=
3
xmlns:rgml=
http://r-project.org/RGML
source=
petal.ps
date=
2013-12-12 08:21:55
creator=
R (3.1.0)
>
<path type=
fill
id=
1
>
<context>
<rgb r=
0.0
g=
0.0
b=
0.0
/>
<style lwd=
10.0
lty=
lineend=
0
linemitre=
10.0
linejoin=
0
/>
</context>
<move y=
0.0
x=
0.0
/>
<line y=
100.0
x=
-50.0
/>
...
<line y=
0.0
x=
0.0
/>
</path>
<summary count=
1
ymax=
175.0
ymin=
0.0
xmax=
58.0078
xmin=
-58.0078
/>
</picture>
As well as <path> elements, a <picture> element may also contain <text> elements, which
represent complete pieces of text. If the text has not been tracedas paths, the <text> element
How to save a filled out pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
pdf form save in reader; extracting data from pdf forms
How to save a filled out pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to fill pdf form in reader; edit pdf form in reader
22
grImport: Importing Vector Graphics
will only contain a <context> element; the text itself, plus its location and size are recorded
as attributes of the <text> element.
If the text has been traced as paths, the <text> element will contain further <path> elements
with type = "char", in which case, the <move> elements and <line> elements describe the
outline of a single letter from a piece of text. This is represented as a different sort of <path>
element because the default drawing algorithm for text can be different from normal paths.
The basic structure of an RGML file consisting of just a single <text> element is shown below
(this is the hello image from Section3.2).
<?xml version=
1.0
encoding=
ISO-8859-1
?>
<picture version=
3
xmlns:rgml=
http://r-project.org/RGML
source=
hello.ps
date=
2013-12-12 08:21:59
creator=
R (3.1.0)
>
<text id=
1
string=
hello
type=
text
y=
0.0
x=
0.0
angle=
0
width=
199.992
height=
<context>
<rgb r=
0.0
g=
0.0
b=
0.0
/>
<style lwd=
10.0
lty=
lineend=
0
linemitre=
10.0
linejoin=
0
/>
</context>
</text>
<summary count=
1
ymax=
67.8438
ymin=
-1.0
xmax=
199.992
xmin=
0.0
/>
</picture>
The grImport package provides a DTD file, rgml.dtd, and an equivalent XML Schema,
rgml.xsd, that formalize the RGML document structure.
3.6. The Picture class
This section provides a more complete description of the Picture class, and the other asso-
ciated classes, that are used to represent imported images in R. This information is useful for
dealing directly with Picture objects.
As mentioned previously, the components of a Picture data structure have a one-to-one
correspondence with the elements of an RGML file, so most elements and attributes from
the previous section are represented as slots in an R object within this section. For example,
where an RGML file has one or more <path> elements, the Picture class has a paths slot
containing a list of paths.
APicture object has two slots: the paths slot contains a list of shapes that describe the
image and the summary slot contains the summary information for the image.
R> slotNames(petal)
[1] "paths"
"summary"
The components of the list in the paths slot are all S4 objects, each with a class corresponding
to one type of <path> or <text> element in an RGML file:
VB.NET Image: How to Draw and Cutomize Text Annotation on Image
can adopt these APIs to work out more advanced Fill.Solid_Color = Color.Gray 'set filled shapes color As Bitmap = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName &
change font size pdf form reader; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
VB.NET TIFF: Make Custom Annotations on TIFF Image File in VB.NET
This online guide content is Out Dated! with image, as well as delete and save annotation made set annotation edge color 'set the property of filled shape obj
exporting pdf data to excel; make pdf form editable in reader
Paul Murrell
23
RGML element
S4 class
<path type = "stroke"> PictureStroke
<path type = "fill">
PictureFill
<path type = "char">
PictureChar
<text>
PictureText
PictureStroke, PictureFill, and PictureChar objects all have four slots: the x and y slots
contain numeric vectors that specify the locations of the vertices of the path, an rgb slot
contains the color for the path, and an lwd slot contains the line width.
The following code and output shows the first (and only) path in the imported petal image.
This path is a PictureFill object.
R> str(petal@paths[[1]])
Formal class
PictureFill
[package "grImport"] with 9 slots
..@ rule
: chr "nonzero"
..@ x
: Named num [1:36] 0 -50 -54 -56.6 -57.9 ...
.. ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:36] "move" "line" "line" "line" ...
..@ y
: Named num [1:36] 0 100 109 118 125 ...
.. ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:36] "move" "line" "line" "line" ...
..@ rgb
: chr "#000000"
..@ lty
: num(0)
..@ lwd
: num 10
..@ lineend : num 1
..@ linejoin : num 1
..@ linemitre: num 10
APictureText object has three additional slots: the string slot contains the text to draw,
and the w and h slots contain the width and height of the text, respectively.
The following code and output shows the first (and only) path in the imported text image.
This path is a PictureText object.
R> str(hellotext@paths[[1]])
Formal class
PictureText
[package "grImport"] with 14 slots
..@ string
: Named chr "hello"
.. ..- attr(*, "names")= chr "string"
..@ w
: num 200
..@ h
: num 100
..@ bbox
: num [1:4] 0.891 -1 199.992 67.844
..@ angle
: num 0
..@ letters : list()
..@ x
: num 0
..@ y
: num 0
..@ rgb
: chr "#000000"
..@ lty
: num(0)
VB.NET PDF: Use VB Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Pages for
This online guide content is Out Dated! obj.FontBrush.Solid_Color = Color.Blue 'set filled font color As Bitmap = obj.PDFTextDrawing() img.Save(folderName__1 &
extracting data from pdf into excel; filling out pdf forms with reader
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
4. FilledRectangle. Click to draw a filled rectangle annotation. Click to save created redaction with customized name. 6. zoomIn. Click to zoom out current file.
how to fill out pdf forms in reader; extract data from pdf into excel
24
grImport: Importing Vector Graphics
..@ lwd
: num 10
..@ lineend : num(0)
..@ linejoin : num(0)
..@ linemitre: num(0)
The summary slot of a Picture object is a PictureSummary object with slots for the number
of shapes in the image, plus bounding box information. The following code and output shows
the summary information from the imported petal image.
R> str(petal@summary)
Formal class
PictureSummary
[package "grImport"] with 3 slots
..@ numPaths: num 1
..@ xscale : Named num [1:2] -58 58
.. ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:2] "xmin" "xmax"
..@ yscale : Named num [1:2] 0 175
.. ..- attr(*, "names")= chr [1:2] "ymin" "ymax"
3.7. Picture objects to grid grobs
The grid.picture() function uses the grid package to draw a Picture object.
This involves two steps: first the Picture object is convertedinto several gridgrobs (graphical
objects) and then those grobs are drawn within a grid viewport that takes care of all of the
necessary coordinate system transformations.
The grid.picture() function converts a Picture object to grobs by calling the function
grobify() on each component of the paths slot in the Picture object. The grobify() func-
tion is an S4 generic function with methods for PictureFill, PictureStroke, PictureChar,
and PictureText objects. For example, the grobify() method for PictureFill objects
creates a path grob, whereas the method for PictureText objects creates a text grob.
The grid.picture() function provides an argument called FUN that allows the grobify()
function to be replaced with a custom function. This makes it possible to fully control the
conversion of the Picture paths into grid grobs.
Table 7 shows an example of this sort of customization. An S4 generic function called
blueify() is defined, with methods for PictureFill and PictureStroke objects. The
PictureFill method produces a path grob and the PictureStroke method produces a
polyline grob, just like the standard grobify() function would do. The difference is that
the blueify() methods set the fill and border colors for these grobs by converting the orig-
inal RGB color from the the original image to a corresponding shade of blue (using the
blueShade() function that is defined in Table6).
With this blueify() generic function defined, we can draw the tiger image that we saw on
page15, but this time using different shades of blue. The following code does this drawing
and the resulting image is shown in Figure16.
R> grid.picture(tiger[-1],
+
FUN = blueify)
R>
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add Rectangle Annotation to Images &
Add-on successfully stands itself out from other C# Color.Gray;//set filled shape color img = obj.CreateAnnotation(); img.Save(folderName + "RectangleAnnotation
extract data from pdf form; sign pdf form reader
Paul Murrell
25
library(colorspace)
blueShade <- function(inrgb) {
rgb <- col2rgb(inrgb)
RGB <- RGB(t(rgb)/255)
# Special case "black"
if (all(coords(RGB) == 0))
RGB <- RGB(0, 0, .1)
LCH <- as(RGB, "polarLUV")
lch <- coords(LCH)
# Scale the chroma so greys become blues
hcl(240, 20 + .8*lch[2], lch[1])
}
Table 6: R code that defines a function to convert an RGB color into a corresponding shade
of blue.
setGeneric("blueify",
function(object, ...) {
standardGeneric("blueify")
})
setMethod("blueify", signature(object="PictureFill"),
function (object, ...) {
pathGrob(object@x, object@y,
default.units="native",
gp=gpar(col=NA,
fill=blueShade(object@rgb)),
...)
})
setMethod("blueify", signature(object="PictureStroke"),
function (object, ...) {
polylineGrob(object@x, object@y,
default.units="native",
gp=gpar(col=blueShade(object@rgb)),
...)
})
Table 7: R code that defines a custom transformation from Picture paths to grid grobs.
The function blueify() is an S4 generic function with methods for PictureFill and
PictureStroke objects. This function generates grobs that have a fill color or border color
based on the original colors from the image, but converted into a corresponding shade of blue,
using the blueShade() function from Table6
26
grImport: Importing Vector Graphics
Figure 16: A modification of the tiger image from Figure9 with all colors drawn as shades of
blue.
3.8. Complex paths
One of the more sophisticatedfeatures of PostScript is that it allows paths tobe quite complex.
For example, a path may intersect itself and a path may be disjoint, being composed of more
than one shape, with the shapes able to overlap and create holes within one another. From
version 2.12.0, R can faithfully reproduce these sorts of complex paths.
In order to demonstrate this, the next example introduces a new image, which is a logo for
the GNU project (designed by Aur´elio A. Heckert). The original file is in an SVG format and
this was converted to a PostScript format using Inkscape. The PostScript file, GNU.ps, can
be imported using the tools described previously, as shown by the following code (see Figure
17).
R> PostScriptTrace("GNU.ps", "GNU.xml")
R> GNU <- readPicture("GNU.xml")
R> grid.picture(GNU)
It can still be useful, or just interesting, to explore the components of complex paths like this.
The picturePaths() function draws each separate path within an imported image. The
following code uses this function to show that there are only two paths in the GNU logo, and
the second one is the complex one (see Figure18).
R> picturePaths(GNU, nr = 1, nc = 2, label = FALSE)
Another useful tool is the explodePaths() function. This function takes any path that
consists of more than one disjoint shape and breaks it into several distinct paths, each con-
sisting of just a single shape. The following code demonstrates this function being used to
Paul Murrell
27
Figure 17: The GNU logo in its original form (left) and after importing and drawing with R
(right).
Figure 18: The paths that make up the GNU logo: a white background and a (complex) black
foreground.
explode the paths in the GNU logo and the subsequent broken paths are shown again using
picturePaths(), this time with freeScales=TRUE, which means that each individual path
is drawn on its own scale (see Figure19).
R> brokenGNU <- explodePaths(GNU)
R> picturePaths(brokenGNU, nr = 3, nc = 5,
+
label = FALSE, freeScales = TRUE)
The output shows that the complex second path in the original image was composed of 13
disjoint shapes.
4. Applications and examples
This section describes and demonstrates some possible uses of the grImport package.
Astraightforward use of the grid.symbols() function is to import an external image as a
custom plotting symbol for a scatterplot, as was previously demonstrated in Figure8 (Section
2.3).
Astraightforwarduse of the grid.picture() functionis to adda company logo toa plot. This
has been done “for real” within a large pharmaceutical research and development company,
but unfortunately legal constraints prevent the publishing of that example. Instead, the code
below demonstrates the basic idea by adding the GNU logo from Section3.8 as a“watermark”
background to a lattice barchart.
R> barchart(~ cit, main = "Number of Citations per Year", xlab = "",
+
panel = function(...) {
28
grImport: Importing Vector Graphics
Figure 19: The paths in the GNU logo (see Figure18) after “exploding” the complex path
into several smaller and simpler paths.
+
grid.picture(GNU)
+
grid.rect(gp = gpar(fill = rgb(1, 1, 1, .9)))
+
panel.barchart(...)
+
})
This code washes out the logo by simply drawing a semitransparent rectangle over the top.
The resulting plot is shown in Figure20.
4.1. Scraping data from images
A less obvious application of the grImport package, and one that demonstrates working
directly with the Picture objects in R, was suggested by Daniel Jackson of the MRC Bio-
statistics Unit in Cambridge (private communication). The context for this application is the
practice of meta-analysis, specifically in the area of survival data.
Aproblem that researchers face in this area is how to obtain data from published articles when
the original data are not provided. An article may include summary tables and plots, but
raw data values may not be available. In practice, researchers sometimes resort to measuring
plots, such as survival curves, with a pencil and ruler in order to retrieve at least some raw
data points. If an article of interest is published in an electronic format, it may be possible
to use the grImport package to radically improve both the accuracy and efficiency of such a
task.
In order to demonstrate this idea, the following example will process a survival curve that
was published in the newsletter of the R project for statistical computing (Lumley2004).
Asurvival plot appears on page 27 of this R News issue. Figure21 shows the original context
of the plot.
Paul Murrell
29
Number of Citations per Year
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
0
500
1000
1500
2000
Figure 20: A barplot of the exponential growth in the number of citations of R, with a GNU
logo watermark.
A number of tools can be used to extract just a single page from a multiple-page PDF
document and convert that page to PostScript format. In this case, the resulting file is called
page27.ps and this is converted to RGML format by the following code.
R> PostScriptTrace("page27.ps")
We do not need the entire page, but using the picturePaths() function and a little trial and
error, it is possible to determine which paths constitute the survival plot in the top-left corner
of the page. The following code reads the RGML file into a Picture object and extracts just
the paths that make up the crucial part of the plot: paths 3 to 16 draw the axes, path 18 is
the green curve, and path 27 is the blue curve.
R> page27 <- readPicture("page27.ps.xml")
R> survivalPlot <- page27[c(3:16, 18, 27)]
The following code draws the extracted paths and the result is shown in Figure22.
R> pushViewport(viewport(gp = gpar(lex = .2)))
R> grid.picture(survivalPlot)
R> popViewport()
The original image shows that the outer tick marks are at locations 0 and 100 on the y-axis
and 0 and 2.5 on the x-axis. These locations can be matched to the locations of the paths
that make up those tick marks in the Picture object in order to establish a scale for the
paths that make up the green and blue curves. For example, the picturePaths() function
can be used to determine that the lowest tick mark on the y-axis is drawn by the ninth path
in survivalPlot and zero on the vertical scale is at the y-location of this path.
30
grImport: Importing Vector Graphics
Vol.4/1,June2004
27
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
0
20
40
60
80100
Years since randomisation
% surviving
Standard
New
Figure1: Survival distributions fortwo lungcancer
treatments
Proportionalhazards models
The mainstay of survival analysis in the medical
world is the Cox proportional hazards model and
its extensions. This expresses the hazard (or rate)
of eventsasanunspecifiedbaselinehazardfunction
multipliedbyafunctionof thepredictorvariables.
Writing h(t;z) forthehazardattimet withpre-
dictorvariables Z=ztheCoxmodelspecifies
logh(t,z)= logh
0
(t)eβz.
Somewhat unusually for a semiparametric model,
thereisvery littlelossof efficiency byleaving h
0
(t)
unspecified,andcomputationis, if anything, easier
thanforparametricmodels.
AstandardexampleoftheCoxmodelisonecon-
structedattheMayoClinic topredict survivalinpa-
tientswithprimarybiliarycirrhosis,arareliverdis-
ease. This diseaseis nowtreatedby livertransplan-
tation, but at the sametherewas no effectivetreat-
ment. Themodelisbasedondatafrom 312patients
inarandomisedtrial.
> data(pbc)
> mayomodel<-coxph(Surv(time,status)~edtrt+
log(bili)+log(protime)+
age+platelet,
data=pbc, subset=trt>0)
> mayomodel
Call:
coxph(formula = Surv(time, status) ~ edtrt +
log(bili) + log(protime) +
age + platelet, data = pbc,
subset = trt > 0)
coef exp(coef)
edtrt
1.02980
2.800
log(bili)
0.95100
2.588
log(protime) 2.88544
17.911
age
0.03544
1.036
platelet
-0.00128
0.999
se(coef)
z
p
edtrt
0.300321 3.43 0.00061
log(bili)
0.097771 9.73 0.00000
log(protime) 1.031908 2.80 0.00520
age
0.008489 4.18 0.00003
platelet
0.000927 -1.38 0.17000
Likelihood ratio test=185 on 5 df, p=0 n= 312
The survexp function can be used to compare
predictionsfromaproportionalhazardsmodeltoac-
tualsurvival.Herethecomparisonisfor106patients
whodidnotparticipateintherandomisedtrial.They
aredivided into two groups basedonwhetherthey
hadedema(fluidaccumulationintissues),animpor-
tantriskfactor.
> plot(survfit(Surv(time,status)~edtrt,
data=pbc,subset=trt==-9))
> lines(survexp(~edtrt+
ratetable(edtrt=edtrt,bili=bili,
platelet=platelet,age=age,
protime=protime),
data=pbc,
subset=trt==-9,
ratetable=mayomodel,
cohort=TRUE),
col="purple")
Theratetablefunctioninthemodelformulawraps
thevariablesthat areusedto matchthenewsample
totheoldmodel.
Figure2showsthecomparisonofpredictedsur-
vival(purple) andobservedsurvival(black)inthese
106 patients. The fit is quite good, especially as
people who do and do not participate in a clin-
ical trial are often quite different in many ways.
0
1000 2000 3000 4000
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
Figure2:Observedandpredictedsurvival
Themainassumptionoftheproportionalhazards
modelisthathazardsfordifferentgroupsareinfact
proportional, i.e. that β is constant overtime. The
RNews
ISSN1609-3631
Figure 21: A page from the newsletter of the R project for statistical computing that includes
asurvival curve at top left.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested