c# encrypt pdf : Extract table data from pdf to excel SDK control project winforms web page .net UWP in5-review0-part1197

DIGITAL PUBLISHING
G
in5: HTML5 Publishing From InDesign
By Rose Rossello
Volume 1, Number 9 • January 14, 2013
FROM THE PUBLISHER OF THE SEYBOLD REPORT
THE 
LATEST 
WORD 
KITEREADERS AND LITTLE PICKLE 
PRESS: STAKING A CLAIM IN THE 
CHILDREN’S E-BOOK MARKET 
PROFILE OF MEDIAWIDE, 
A GOING DIGITAL 
CONFERENCE SPONSOR 
ISSN: 2169-1150
Editor’s Note: While the majority of publishers developing native apps using Adobe’s Digital 
Publishing Suite or other platforms, some publishers are using HTML5. However, as many 
publishers are working in a cross-channel or multi-channel publishing environment for 
print and digital publishing, they are using InDesign as the production starting point. In 
light of the interest in HTML5, we felt a review of a new InDesign plug-in Ajar Productions 
has developed to simplify the process of converting a design created in Adobe InDesign 
to HTML5 would be of interest to our readers. 
Extract table data from pdf to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
collect data from pdf forms; online form pdf output
Extract table data from pdf to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
save data in pdf form reader; flatten pdf form in reader
 
HOME
in5: HTML5 
Publishing 
From 
InDesign
By Rose Rossello
Editor’s Note: While the majority of publishers developing native apps 
using Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite or other platforms, some pub-
lishers are using HTML5. However, as many publishers are working in 
a cross-channel or multi-channel publishing environment for print and 
digital publishing, they are using InDesign as the production starting 
point. In light of the interest in HTML5, we felt a review of a new InDe-
sign plug-in Ajar Productions has developed to simplify the process of 
converting a design created in Adobe InDesign to HTML5 would be of 
interest to our readers.
C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Execute MailMerge in OpenXML File with Data Source. Execute MailMerge in Microsoft Access Database by Using Data Source(X86 Only).
extract data from pdf using java; exporting pdf form to excel
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
extract pdf data into excel; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
 
HOME
About Ajar Productions
Ajar Productions is the animation and software studio of husband and wife 
Justin Putney and AJ Petersen. Together they create extensions for Adobe’s 
products including Flash, Illustrator, and InDesign, many of which they provide 
at no cost. They raised money for their latest product, in5, using Kickstarter
Although they started with a target pledge goal of $5,000, Ajar Productions re-
ceived more than $12,000 from 238 backers in 30 days. It seems the design and 
publishing market is interested in a low-cost solution for generating HTML5 
from InDesign files.
HTML5 from InDesign
Although InDesign files can be saved as HTML, the export does not preserve 
the layout of the document or conserve any interactivity in the InDesign file. 
Ajar’s in5 plug-in allows designers to create layouts using InDesign’s built-in 
tools, including video/audio embedding, and export a replica of the layout 
while adding swipe navigation, offline application caching, and other features. 
Font embedding of local OTF and TTF fonts is also supported, and Web-safe 
fonts can be automatically swapped in by in5 when the selected font is not 
present on the viewer’s device. The plug-in supports InDesign CS4 and later.
Additional features in in5 include:

the ability to render text as HTML or as images to preserve appearance,

HTML and CSS output of columns, paragraph rules, bullet lists, num-
bered lists, and anchored images, and

the ability to open URLs and images in a Lightbox so the viewer does 
not leave current the page.
in5 also preserves the following built-in InDesign features:

HTML code embedding (from YouTube, Vimeo, Google Maps, etc.) and 
SWF embedding,

links on objects as well as the button actions Go to Destination, Go to 
Next Page, Go to Previous Page, Go to First page, 

Alt text using the button name, script label, or Alt text within the Object 
Export Options palette,

mapping styles to specific HTML tags, and

Table of Contents linking and linking between pages.
The plug-in includes mechanisms that make conversion easier. For example, on 
export, in5 automatically converts any measurement units (pica, millimeters, 
etc.) to pixels, the basic unit on the Web, allowing previously designed docu-
ments to be reused without changing the document size. In addition, regard-
less of the color space used (CMYK, RGB, or Lab), in5 converts colors to RGB hex 
values. The plug-in calculates the tint values using the existing color space, so 
the hex color closely matches the look of the color in InDesign.
All media—movies, sounds, and Flash SWFs—include fallbacks automatically 
when exported. Fallbacks allow different versions of content to be displayed 
depending on the browser capabilities available. For movies, InDesign supports 
mp4 files formatted with H.264 encoding, but not all browsers support this type 
of file. To compensate, in5 searches in the same folder for files with the same 
name, but in different movie file formats, in order to support additional browsers, 
and substitutes suitable files on the fly. If a browser does not support one of the 
available formats (or the HTML5 <video> tag), but does support the Flash player, 
in5 instructs the the Flash player to play the video. Similar fallbacks are available 
for audio. For example, when a SWF file is placed in InDesign, but the browser 
does not support Flash, in5 will display the corresponding poster image.
in5 in Use
Ajar Productions provided us with a full version of the in5 plug-in for this re-
view. The plug-in installs as all plug-ins do via Adobe Extension Manager. In 
InDesign, the plug-in is accessed from the File menu (File > Export HTML5 with 
in5), which presents the in5 export dialog. The first panel of the in5 export dia-
log presents options for setting the title text (which appears at the top of the 
Web browser) and selecting the destination folder where assets will be saved. 
Here the user can also select Page Format and Navigation.
The page format determines how the pages will be displayed in HTML. There 
are five page format options including vertical and horizontal scroll and verti-
cal, horizontal, and fade-in slider. With Continuous Scroll formats, the viewer 
navigates through the pages using the browser’s built-in scrolling (or with cus-
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also supported. methods and events necessary to load a Word document from file or query data and save the
make pdf form editable in reader; extracting data from pdf forms
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB In the following code table, you will find a piece
how to save editable pdf form in reader; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
 
HOME
tom navigation added in InDesign). A number of pages are visible at any time 
based on the width or height of the browser window. The Slider formats display 
only one page at a time. Pages can be navigated using built-in arrows or using 
custom navigation built in InDesign. The pages then slide horizontally or verti-
cally or cross-fade during navigation. 
There are several additional navigation options: 

The Enable Swipe Navigation and Show Back/Next Arrows options are 
available for the Slider page formats. Swipe Navigation allow users with 
a touch screen to move through the pages with swipe gestures.

The Show Back/Next Arrows option creates automatic page navigation 
elements, eliminating the need to build the elements in the InDesign 
document.

A Lightbox is new content window which opens on top of existing con-
tent. Links as well as images can be opened in a Lightbox.

The Open Thumbnails in Lightbox command opens larger versions of 
images tagged Mark as Thumbnail. (We explain the process for creating 
such thumbnails later in this article.)
The Text Rendering options control how InDesign text frames are rendered af-
ter being exported to HTML5. There are several options:

The default option is rendering the text as images, which preserves the 
exact appearance of each text frame as a separate PNG file.

HTML with Web-Safe Fallback Fonts translates InDesign copy and styles 
into HTML and CSS and analyzes the characteristics of fonts used to de-
termine suitable back-up fonts to be displayed in cases when the exact 
font is not available on the viewer’s device. 

HTML with Local Font Embedding generates Web-safe fallbacks and 
also copies OpenType and TrueType fonts from the local machine and 
embeds them into the CSS using the @font-face rule. This option should 
be used sparingly because many fonts are not licensed to be used on 
the Web. Google provides more than 600 free fonts for Web use without 
licensing restrictions. In addition, several font foundries now offer Web 
licenses for many of their commercial print fonts. 
The SEO section of the in5 export dialog allows the user to add a description, 
keywords, and author for search engine optimization purposes. The Auto but-
ton under Keywords can be used to generate keywords automatically based on 
the mostly frequently repeated words in the document.
The Advanced section of the in5 export dialog allows the user to set the col-
or of the background of each page. For better rendering on mobile devices, 
the viewport setting can be selected. The Viewport tag instructs mobile Web 
browsers how to render a given page: zooming it to the device width, page 
width, or forcing 100% scale. Show Audio Controls generates a standard set of 
playback controls to start, stop, skip ahead, and adjust volume. Files can also be 
set to cache for offline viewing. The Advanced Rendering options provide ad-
ditional ways to direct how in5 converts InDesign content to HTML:

Render Rectangles as CSS (when possible) renders rectangles as <div> 
tags and CSS, rather than as PNG images. Rendering in CSS often results 
in a smaller file size.
The in5 plug-in is installed 
in the File menu.
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Create the Data Abstraction Layer. Drag and drop the REImageDatabase table from the server provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; html form output to pdf
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Easy to put link into specified position of PDF text, image and PDF table. Enable users to copy and paste PDF link. Help to extract and search url in PDF file.
pdf data extraction to excel; vb extract data from pdf
 
HOME

Render Groups as Images will treat groups as images versus rendering 
the content inside of the group. This option can be useful for maintain-
ing the appearance of items with complex blending modes or effects 
not supported well in HTML. Those interested in more information 
should watch the video on the Ajar Productions Web site

When an object spans across multiple pages (horizontally) in a spread, 
InDesign treats the object as if it belongs to a single page. By checking 
Allow Page Items to Span Across Pages within Spreads, objects spanning 
a horizontal page allows the objects to appear on all associated pages. 
Our Tests
To test the capabilities of in5, we first started with a typical issue of another Joss 
Group publication, the Seybold Report. The only changes we made to the inDe-
sign production file were to remove a full page PDF from one of the pages and 
to remove a couple of pages promoting a Joss Group event.
We also used in5’s Mark as Thumbnail feature on a page featuring several im-
ages. In5 provides an easy way to create photo galleries. When an image is im-
ported into InDesign and then scaled down, right-clicking on the image pres-
ents a new option (installed as part of the in5 plug-in) called Mark as Thumbnail. 
When an image has this designation, in5 will automatically open the original 
unscaled image when the thumbnail image is clicked. The resulting large im-
age can be rendered in a new browser window or a Lightbox when the Open 
Thumbnails in Lightbox option is selected in the in5 export dialog.
We saved our file and selected Export as HTML5 using in5 from the File menu. 
For our first test, we chose the Slider horizontal page option, included naviga-
tion and Lightboxes for links and images, and HTML with font embedding. We 
used the auto feature to generate keywords. The plug-in generated the follow-
ing commonly used words: response, report, color, codes, print, using, rates, 
marketing, and quilt. The terms color management and QR codes would have 
been better choices. We used the default Advanced settings except we changed 
the Viewport setting to Zoom to Device Width.
Our first results were not very good. A blank page was inserted after every page 
in the document. Positioning of elements on the page was not accurate in most 
cases. However, results were better after we made a few adjustments to our 
output settings. We chose Continuous Scroll (horizontal) for our page layout 
and HTML with Web-safe fallback as our rendering option. The second attempt 
produced no blank pages, but our custom navigation was still invisible, and text 
and image placement issues occurred. 
Ajar is aware its plug-in has a limitation related to images with text wrapping, 
which is the case with our test document. Images placed on an InDesign page 
and assigned a text wrap force any text frame intersecting with the image to 
wrap around it. To maintain this effect when exporting with in5, the image must 
be converted to an inline object either by cutting and pasting the object into 
the intersecting text frame or dragging the anchor icon on the image frame to 
a point in the text frame.
Prior to our third test, we converted all of the images with text wrap to inline 
and also mapped some of our InDesign paragraph styles to HTML styles. (These 
settings are available in the Styles palette.) We also selected Render Groups as 
Images in the export dialog. In cases where an image was grouped with a cap-
tion to create the inline object, the layout was not rendered correctly. But, inline 
images appeared in the correct location. Overall, mapping the styles produced 
the same results as in previous tests. We think there is some issue with character 
styles not getting translated properly. We had several situations where a few 
words in a paragraph had an HTML link were stylized with a character style. 
When exported, the entire paragraph appeared to be a link (blue and under-
lined), yet the hyperlinks did not work. Our thumbnails also still did not work. 
For our fourth test using the same document, we choose to output pages as 
images. Unfortunately, the plug-in continually encountered an error and would 
not complete the export. The export dialog does not give users the option of 
selecting one or a range of pages to export. If this option had been present, we 
might have been able to discover which page caused the error. 
Since tests with our publication layout did not produce usable results, we decide 
to create a new document to see if we could achieve a better outcome. Using 
text and images from our first document, we created a single column layout, 
marked images as thumbnails, embedded code from a YouTube video (using 
Object > Embed HTML), and created a link to the video by placing a hyperlink 
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
position, such as PDF text, image and PDF table. Extract and search url in existing PDF file in VB including website, image, document, bookmark, PDF page number
how to fill in a pdf form in reader; fill in pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste In the following code table, you will find
extracting data from pdf to excel; how to make pdf editable form reader
 
HOME
on a text frame (versus applying the link to the text itself). We also added some 
previous and next navigation on our master page using the Next and Previ-
ous options in the Button and Forms palette. We chose Slider (Horizontal) for 
our page output format, HTML with Web safe fallback for text rendering, and 
changed the viewport option to Let the Device choose. We also turned off all 
the Advanced Rendering options: Render rectangles as CSS, Render Groups as 
Images, and Allow Page items to Span Across pages within spreads.
The results this time were nearly perfect with one exception. The HTML link 
we inserted on the text frame did not work properly. We ran the test again, 
but placed the link on the text. This time the Lightbox did appear, but nothing 
was rendered (the link was suppose to lead to the YouTube video). When the 
Lightbox was displayed, the document transitioned to the previous page. When 
we closed the Lightbox, the document auto transitioned back to the page the 
link appeared. 
We changed the link and ran the export again. In this final test we were able 
to get the text link to work properly. However, the background document still 
switched to the previous page. We noticed the text appearing in the same text 
box as the text with the hyperlink was also underlined, which is not how it was 
styled in our InDesign document. We ran the test again and did not apply un-
derline to any of the text, and the resulting output was styled correctly. 
We ran one final test using this file and exported with the text rendering set 
to Images. This time the output worked including our image Lightboxes. Only 
one thing was missing: the text with the link was not styled like a link (blue and 
underlined), so unless someone knew the text was there or happened to cursor 
over it, the link would not be noticed. So, we re-ran the test stylizing the linked 
text with an underline...and voila! Perfect output.
We suggest, then, when using the plug-in to render text during export, remove 
any hyperlink text styles. Stylizing text with hyperlinks can cause unexpected 
results. The plug-in will generate a standard looking link automatically. (If the 
browser default is not acceptable, it can be changed easily by editing the result-
ing CSS file.) If rendering text as an image, stylize any linked text to make it clear 
where links are is the solution.  
Test results are presented on the following pages.
To view the actual HTML5 output, please click the links below.
Test 1
Test 2
Test 3
Test 4*
Test 5
Test 6
Test 7
Test 8
Test 9
Test 10
Test 11
Total assets for each test ranged from nearly four megabytes for our 10-page 
sample file and less than two megabytes for the second test InDesign file.
*Test 4 (output as images) produced no results.
VB Imaging - VB ISBN Barcode Tutorial
BarcodeType.ISBN 'set barcode data barcode.Data = "978047082163" 'set print ISBN on these files: PDF, TIFF, Microsoft with the properties from the table in the
extract data from pdf c#; how to type into a pdf form in reader
VB Imaging - VB Code 2 of 5 Generator
5 barcode size with parameters listed in the table below. quality Code 2 of 5 on PDF, TIFF, Microsoft of 5 type barcode encoding numeric data text "112233445566
exporting pdf data to excel; export pdf form data to excel
 
HOME
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
Color Management Best Practices: Getting 
Us All Speaking the Same Language
By Erica Aitken and Rich Apollo
From the day an idea is born until it is printed and distributed, thousands of glitches can pop 
up on the way to producing a disappointing printed piece. But, all of these glitches can go 
away when, from start to finish, a common language is spoken through process control and 
a standardized workflow. 
1-to-1 Response Rate Report: Benchmark 
Information For Relevant Cross-Media 
Marketing
A Caslon Report
The goal of Caslon’s 1-to-1 Response Rate Report is to provide an analysis of the response 
rate lift possible when conducting well thought out relevant marketing campaigns involving 
variable print. Our two primary sources of information are the PODi collection of case stud-
ies and the Direct Marketing Association’s 2012 Response Rate Report. 
ISSN: 1533-9211
Save the Date!
the Seybold Report Reunion Conference
april 18 and 19, 2013 
theRe’S Still time to RegiSteR!
going Digital:  
The Digital Publishing Report Conference
November 8 and 9, 2012 
QR Codes as Art
By Molly Joss
QR codes turn up in the most unexpected places these 
days, which is an indication of how well the little magic 
squares becoming ingrained in the public’s awareness 
and imagination. Even so, things seem to be going 
to extremes this month here in the Philadelphia area 
when the codes turned up at quilt shows and in urban 
wall murals with all their magic intact. 
The Latest Word 
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
4
HoMe
e
team on how to use and maintain the production system, and additional 
consulting with the agency’s print buyer on how to select G7 vendors. 
This investment is small compared to the cost of reprints and missed 
deadlines and gets smaller once the value of keeping clients happy is 
factored into the mix. 
Viewing colors accurately from the beginning makes re-purposing 
foolproof, allowing teams to function well in the global environment 
of flexo, offset, digital, cardboard, paper, plastic, large, small, here, and 
there. Also, agencies are better able to use multiple competing vendors 
for projects which must match no matter where they are printed. 
By taking responsibility for process control and requiring vendors be 
G7-compliant, particularly for agencies that use multiple competing 
vendors, good color will originate at the agency—a natural starting 
point as the agency is held accountable for the final product. TSR
About erica Aitken and Rich Apollo
Erica Aitken and co-founder Son Do started Rods and 
Cones in 1996. Aitken is now President of the company. 
She says her experience as a Production Manager and a 
designer grappling with color management helped con-
vince her a business dedicated to helping create beauti-
ful, predictable, and accurate proofs was a worthwhile 
endeavor and thus Rods and Cones was born.
Rich Apollo is Field Services Manager at Rods and 
Cones. Apollo graduated from Southwest Missouri 
State University with a BFA in Graphic Design. To learn 
more about Macs, he got a job in prepress and discov-
ered he liked the world of print. He quickly became 
involved in color management and spoke for the first 
time about color management years ago at one of the 
Seybold Conferences in San Francisco. He has spent years working with 
offset and digital presses. He is G7-certified, an Adobe Certified Expert, 
and has served on the GATF Advisory Committee and was a co-chair at 
the 2009 G7 Summit.
G7 standard. For more information about G7, please visit the Ideal-
liance Web site: http://www.idealliance.org.
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
2
HoMe
e
Color management Best Practices: getting Us all Speaking the 
Same language
By Erica Aitken and Rich Apollo
From the day an idea is born until it is printed and distributed, thou-
sands of glitches can pop up on the way to producing a disappointing 
printed piece. But, all of these glitches can go away when, from start 
to finish, a common language is spoken through process control and a 
standardized workflow. 
Upstream in such a standardized workflow, the content creator uses a 
profiled professional level-graphic monitor, standardized application 
settings, works within an achievable color gamut using ICC profiles, and 
preflights and proofs files before delivering them to the printer. A work-
flow like this is predictably reliable and results in no foreseeable color 
discrepancies. 
But, standardized workflows should be used downstream, too. We often 
think standards are just to ensure a sound workflow upstream and in-
correctly believe a contract proof is all a printer needs to make a match. 
This faulty premise also includes the often inaccurate presumption a 
designer knows where and how a file will be printed. Since designers 
are often unaware of how their work will be produced, a better (and 
standards-based) approach for designing an ad or other project for im-
aging on glossy and matte, newsprint, sheetfed, and so forth for a client 
who brokers his own print should include delivering native files with no 
conversions or print specifications. 
Common Procedures, Uncommon Performance
As noted, a simple workflow become more complicated when, as is of-
ten the case, a file goes to multiple destinations, is printed on different 
substrates, and retained to be eventually reprinted. For example, Agency 
A represents a client whose brand is printed on plastic and aluminum, 
large format banners, magazine and newspaper advertising, and point 
of sales collateral for stores. In a workflow involving so many destina-
tions, the reality is there are as many ways to plan and execute the proj-
ect as there are agencies and printers. 
But, a better way is to work is using known and agreed upon specifica-
tions from start to press. Specifications achieved using the G7 method 
ensure a file can be matched on different presses and printers, different 
locations, different substrates, and at different times. 
Working using specifications, Agency A either uses soft proofing or hard 
proofing in house, with devices calibrated using the G7 method and 
G7 is a registered trademark of Idealliance.  
Image courtesy of Idealliance.
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
5
HoMe
e
Rods and Cones Puts G7 to the Test 
Rods and Cones wanted to prove that a file could be printed without 
press check at different locations and produce a near perfect match 
if the vendors followed the G7 process. We conducted two tests with 
this objective in mind: a postcard and a mixed media project.
Assisted Living Project
Our first project was a postcard featuring Robert Kato’s striking pho-
tograph called Assisted Living. We submitted the file to printing com-
panies that had implemented G7 processes into their workflow. They 
agreed to print the cards with no additional instructions or press 
check. The imaging was done on a Heidelberg press, an HP Indigo 
digital press, a Fuji FinalProof, an Epson 9880, and a Xerox Phaser. 
Even with distinctive differences in paper brightness and color, the 
results were astonishing and not achievable with any other method. 
The M&M Project
The second experiment was tougher. We selected three M&M can-
dies and measured their color. We chose red, yellow, and green and, 
because the color values in a bag of this kind of candy vary a lot, we 
read the values of a dozen of each color and averaged the results. 
The four pieces we designed—a small bag to hold the candy, a bro-
chure, a water bottle label and a larger bag to hold the other three 
items—were based on the red, yellow, and green color averages. We 
prepared all the files according to the GRACoL specifications and 
presses calibrated using the G7 method. 
Label Technology in Merced, California printed the small bag on a 
clear-back PET, and the larger one on a metallic-back PET, both on a 
narrow web flexo press. Custom Label in Hayward, California printed 
the bottle label on an Indigo WS4500 press using a 2.6 mil White 
BOPP. And, Community Printers in Santa Cruz, California printed our 
brochure on a Xerox 700, on Sterling Ultra Digital 80#, using the 
G7 process. With the exception of a slight discrepancy in the laser-
printed brochure, most likely due to a hiccup in the preparation of 
the files, the match is impressive. We would be happy to show the 
Seybold Report readers these pieces. Please contact us if you wish to 
see a set. 
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
9
HoMe
e
QR Codes on the Wall
Hall’s quilt is one kind of wall art, but QR codes turned up in another 
kind of wall art around the same time we spotted the quilt. This time, 
though, the QR codes appeared as part of a giant outdoor wall mural 
commissioned by the Mural Arts Project in Philadelphia. Entitled Family 
Interrupted, the mural is located on a wall of a building in an impover-
ished area of North Philadelphia and is a new work designed by muralist 
eric okdeh, who created this project using input from prison inmates, 
probationers, and ex-inmates, adjudicated youth, and community and 
family members. To learn more about this project and to see more pic-
tures of the project, visit the project site. All the QR codes in the mural 
are readable and lead to audio and video materials hosted at the proj-
ect’s Web site. The largest QR code leads to a portion of the site where 
people are can share their stories related to the mural’s theme.
our Take
QR codes have been around for awhile now and probably not a day 
goes by when some industry pundit or analyst announces the end of 
QR codes and says it is time to move to whatever they say is the latest 
and greatest of marketing machinations. However, as these examples 
indicate, when a technology reaches the point where it starts showing 
up in popular culture as art, it becomes easier than ever to sell people 
on using the technology in print. 
And remember—when Andy Warhol started using color separation tech-
niques to create his now iconic images of Marilyn Monroe and Campbell 
soup cans, few people had even heard the term “color separation.” Yet, 
his application of what was, at the time, an unfamiliar, yet easy to use, 
technology, helped win him lasting fame and enviable fortune. Making 
creative use of QR code technology might do the same for other artists 
and graphic arts professionals and help tell a good story at the same 
time. TSR
QR codes on the wall. Giant QR codes were worked into this large wall mural 
project located in North Philadelphia by artist Eric Okdeh. All of the QR codes 
function and lead back to the project’s Web site.
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
3
HoMe
equipped with the ICC profiles of G7-compliant print vendors. Files are 
converted to these vendors’ specifications with the expectation the files 
will print matching colors. If the agency uses a prepress company, the files 
will be prepared in the same way by the prepress company on behalf of 
the agency.
G7 Gives Color a Common Vocabulary
As an industry, we typically measure density and dot gain to communi-
cate how color should be printed, disregarding the fact presses behave 
differently and dot gain or density on one press is not the same as on 
another. Standards written around density and dot gain make the as-
sumption, at the prescribed density and dot gain levels, gray balance 
will occur. But, variations in paper, ink, or even screening can affect this 
delicate balance. And, tone value increase (or dot gain) is set to different 
values for different printing processes such as sheetfed, web, newsprint. 
These differences present a critical problem specifically in industries 
such as packaging where the same brand colors and product shots are 
printed on different substrates and presses. 
The advantage of using the G7 is the standard uses colorimetry rather 
than density, considering color and color balance rather than the weight 
of ink on paper. By referring to a curve called Neutral Print Density Curve 
(NPDC)—a target curve defined along the entire tonal range—gray bal-
ance is measured, neutrality maintained, and color remains consistent 
through the press run and on different presses and papers.
We should point out before continuing the difference between G7 and 
GRACoL7 is G7 is a method used to reach the best consistent and pre-
dictable results on press using gray balance, and GRACoL7 is a set of 
recommendations for print specifications for offset printing based on 
gray balance rather than density and dot gain. It is important also to 
note a G7 calibration is not an attempt to tell the pressroom how to 
print. The calibration process is an agreement between content creator 
and/or prepress and press. A proof is a contract between printer and cli-
ent, with the understanding the pressroom will print a job in a manner 
consistent with the proof. 
Distinctions noted, printing companies that adopt the G7 method be-
come sought-after vendors. Their workflow is more efficient and less 
expensive because they are able to reduce makeready times, know what 
they will achieve on press and, most importantly, use a clear and un-
equivocal language to manage expectations for their clients. 
At the press, aside from resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective 
workflow, using G7 does not affect the balance of the imaging process. 
A gray balance component in the color bar makes it easy to see changes 
and thus enable efficient process control. A single measurement with a 
densitometer can indicate if ink is running high or low and which ink 
requires adjustment. 
In a GRACoL-compliant environment, reading the gray balance patch 
with a densitometer using all filters should yield a density measurement 
of 0.54 above the density of the paper, and the density responses of the 
Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow filters should be within 0.03 of one another. 
Note: GRACoL refers to a print specification for offset printing on a pre-
mium #1 sheet with the proper G7 gray balance.
We All Need to Speak the Same Language 
In some of the online discussion groups on printing, prepress and design, 
the simple question, “Do designers really need to understand prepress 
and printing?” can bring forth hundreds of posts about how designers 
should not be burdened with the technical considerations of file prepara-
tion. The creative mind, such respondents say, should be 100% devoted 
to creation, leaving the execution production details to technical and pre-
press teams and the printer. As one person said on a LinkedIn discussion 
concerning color management, “It would be fantastic if the passing of the 
baton from Creative to Production was as neat as it is in a relay race.”
But, the benefits of employing agreed upon best practices in general, 
and G7 in particular, are immeasurable for the creative community. In 
terms of monetary investment, all running a G7-compliant design sys-
tem takes is a contract proofing device such as an Epson printer with a 
good processor, a profiled professional level monitor, training for the 
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
6
HoMe
e
1-to-1 Response Rate Report: Benchmark information For 
Relevant Cross-media marketing
A Caslon Report
The goal of Caslon’s 1-to-1 Response Rate Report is to provide an analy-
sis of the response rate lift possible when conducting well thought out 
relevant marketing campaigns involving variable print. Our two primary 
sources of information are the PODi collection of case studies and the 
Direct Marketing Association’s 2012 Response Rate Report. 
This report is intended to help set expectations for the lift in response 
rates relevant personalization can provide. We base our calculations on 
data from the PODi collection of case studies. The difficulty with this 
approach is the response rates mentioned in PODi’s cases are atypical. 
After all, the selection process for the PODi cases ensures they repre-
sent much-better-than-average results. Readers should interpret the 
response rates reported here as what is achievable under optimum cir-
cumstances.
Caslon has found response rates to relevant marketing campaigns are, 
on average, more than four times that of responses to static, same-to-all 
messages. This finding comes from a review of data from PODi’s digital 
print case study collection and the DMA’s Response Rate Report. De-
pending on the segment, the increase in response rates due to personal-
ized, relevant marketing ranged from a factor of 1.3 to 6.2.
In the following table and chart we show the response rates by objec-
tive for static and personalized campaigns sent to a house list. These 
response rates are predictably higher than campaigns sent to a prospect 
or rented list. In the full report we will take a look at response rates to 
prospect lists where there is sufficient data.
Response rates are especially high in data gathering and loyalty cam-
paigns where often times there is not an immediate push for a sale or 
special incentives offered based on the recipient’s purchasing history.
We also review response rates by vertical market segment. Average re-
sponse rates to relevant marketing campaigns ranged from 7.2% in non- 
profit to 16% in the printing/publishing segment. It should be noted the 
reported static response rate in the Manufacturing/Technology is unusu-
ally high and should be viewed with caution due to a small sample size.
Campaign 
objective
Personalized 
URL Visit 
Rate
# of 
PoDi 
Cases
Personalized 
Response 
Rate
# of 
PoDi 
Cases
Static 
Response 
Rate (DMA 
data)
Lead Generation
15.70%
14
10.20%
24
3.30%
Direct Order
13.60%
11
9.30%
22
3.10%
Traffic 
Generation
21.60%
5
17.90%
21
3.20%
Data Gathering  
No DMA data
14.00%
7
19.10%
18
Loyalty  
No DMA data
35.20%
3
25.20%
12
Table 1: Average Response Rates By objective For 
Campaigns Sent To A House List
Source: Caslon analysis of PODi and DMA data
The Seybold Report • Volume 12, Number 18 • September 24, 2012
10
HoMe
e
Corporate offiCe
The Joss Group, LLC 
P.O. Box 682
Gilbertsville, PA 19525
(610) 327-3958
publisher/editor: Molly Joss (molly@thejossgroup.com)
associate editor: Bert Latamore (bert@thejossgroup.com)
production: Rose Rossello (rose@thejossgroup.com)
The Seybold Report is published twice a month. Electronic subscriptions (PDF) are available for $499. To 
subscribe or renew your subscription, e-mail us at seybold@thejossgroup.com.
The $499 annual subscription to the Seybold Report, which includes one subscription to GAIND, is an in-
dividual subscription. Sharing an individual subscription with others within your company or work group 
is not allowed by the Joss Group, publisher of the Seybold Report and GAIND. Affordable work group 
subscriptions to the Seybold Report and GAIND are available, and companies are urged to contact the 
Joss Group for pricing and other information.
Site licenses for large companies that wish to maintain multi-year article archives and make the Seybold 
Report content available throughout the organization are also available. 
Please contact the Joss Group for more information and pricing on work group subscription plans and 
site licenses.
© 2012 The Joss Group, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. ISSN: 1533-9211 www.seyboldreport.com
Before we ran the first test, we selected 
a few images to test in5’s Open Images 
in Lightbox feature. The plug-in added 
a new option to the contextual menu 
called Mark as Thumbnail. Right-clicking 
on each image, we applied this option. 
For output settings in the first test we chose the slider horizontal page option, included navigation and 
lightboxes for links and images, and HTML with font embedding.
We used the auto feature to generate search engine keywords. The plug-in responded with some commonly 
used words, but given our test copy (from the Seybold Report) industry-specific terms would have been 
useful. We used the default Advanced settings except for Zoom to Device Width for the Viewpoint option.
 
HOME
Results of the first test using in5 were not very good. Text was underlined in places, 
blank pages were inserted, graphics were not aligned properly, and clicking on the 
image thumbnails did nothing. Footer navigation and page jumps were present but 
invisible. But, the basic geometry of the pages was preserved.
This is an example of the results of using InDesign’s 
built-in Export to HTML option. The text is tagged nicely, 
but the page layout is missing.
10  
HOME
Left: There were no blank 
pages in the second test, but 
built-in navigation was still 
invisible, and text and image 
placement issues abounded.
For the third test we mapped some of the paragraph styles 
to HTML tags and converted images with text wrap to inline 
images, grouping the images with  accompanying captions.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested