c# itextsharp append pdf : Sign pdf form reader SDK control project winforms web page html UWP Introduction%20to%20HTML%20and%20CSS%20v16-part1225

CODE TO TYPE:
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title> My Home Page </title>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<style>
body {
background-color: white;
font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}
.grey {
background-color: #d9d9d9;
}
div#header {
background-color: #d9d9d9;
font-family: Times, serif;
}
div#content {
background-color: #ccccff;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="header">
<h1>Ramblin' Times</h1>
<h2>My Home Page</h2>
</div>
<div id="content">
<p>
My favorite live rock bands:
</p>
<ul>
<li>Phish</li>
<li>Blues Traveler</li>
<li>Widespread Panic</li>
<li>Pink Floyd</li>
<li>Rolling Stones</li>
</ul>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Click 
. Now your header has grey for its  backgro und co lor, and your main content has purple fo r its
backgro und color.
We used the id of each div to select that div. To  use an id to select an element, we use the "#" symbol in front of the id
name in the CSS. We are using a combination of the element name and the id name as the selector. We aren't required
to do that, but it's good practice becaus e it makes the CSS eas ier to read. Try your CSS witho ut the element s elector
here—that is, try using just #he ader and #cont ent —it should work just the s ame.
When to Use a Class and When to Use an ID
The id name yo u give an element using the id attribute must be unique. So, when you style yo ur elem ents using the id,
that style can only ever apply to  the elem ent with that id. However, many elements can share the same class. In fact,
elements can even have more than one class.
When yo u're deciding whether to use a class o r an id, keep these general rules in mind:
When you are creating style that might be useful in m any different situations, use a class.
When you are creating style that is unique to a specific element in yo ur page, use an id.
Also, keep in m ind that an elem ent can have bo th an id attribute and a class attribute, s o you're not lim ited to one or the
other—you can create CSS for both! Let's give that a try.
Sign pdf form reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to save a filled out pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf table
Sign pdf form reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data out of pdf file; extract data from pdf form to excel
Update your HTML to remove the background- color fro m your "div#header" rule, and add the "grey" class to your
header div as s hown:
CODE TO TYPE:
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title> My Home Page </title>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<style>
body {
background-color: white;
font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}
.grey {
background-color: #d9d9d9;
}
div#header {
background-color: #d9d9d9;
font-family: Times, serif;
}
div#content {
background-color: #ccccff;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="grey" id="header">
<h1>Ramblin' Times</h1>
<h2>My Home Page</h2>
</div>
<div id="content">
<p>
My favorite live rock bands:
</p>
<ul>
<li>Phish</li>
<li>Blues Traveler</li>
<li>Widespread Panic</li>
<li>Pink Floyd</li>
<li>Rolling Stones</li>
</ul>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Click 
. Yo ur page should look exactly the same, even though no w, we're using a combination of two
different CSS rules to style the header div: the .grey rule that selects all elements with the clas s "grey", and the
div#he ader rule that s elects the <div> element with the id header. Bo th of these rules  are applied to  the header div,
so that header gets both a grey backgro und and a Times font.
We're s pecifying the background-color and font-family in the body rule, and then overriding tho se pro perties in rules for
specific elements. We'll come back to this again later. For now, just co nsider the reaso ns that may be important.
Linking to CSS in an External File
Once yo ur HTML and CSS starts getting larger, you'll probably want to  keep the CSS in a separate file.
Another good reason to  move your CSS into a separate file is  so you can use that CSS with m ore than one HTML file.
For example, if your website has many HTML files that use the same s tyles, yo u can keep the CSS in one file and link
to it from  many HTML files.
Let's see how to  link to  an external CSS file no w. Copy all the CSS between the opening <style> tag and the closing
</style> tag (do  not  include t he st yle t ags t hemse lves!) and create a new file us ing the New File icon:
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
export pdf form data to excel; extract pdf data into excel
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
View PDF outlines. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
pdf data extraction; how to extract data from pdf to excel
Paste in the CSS and save it in your /ht mlcss1 folder as hom epage.css.
Now we need to  link to that file from yo ur HTML so it knows to use that style. Switch back to m ybands .html, update yo ur
<head> element to add a link to  your new CSS file, then remove the <s tyle> element, like this:
CODE TO TYPE:
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title> My Home Page </title>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<style>
</style>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="homepage.css">
</head>
<body >
<div class="grey" id="header">
<h1>Ramblin' Times</h1>
<h2>My Home Page</h2>
</div>
<div id="content">
<p>
My favorite live rock bands:
</p>
<ul>
<li>Phish</li>
<li>Blues Traveler</li>
<li>Widespread Panic</li>
<li>Pink Floyd</li>
<li>Rolling Stones</li>
</ul>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Click 
. Yo ur page should look exactly the same, even though no w your style is  being lo aded from the
homepage.css file rather than from directly within your HTML.
You can use bo th of these methods together; that is, yo u can link to an external CSS file and define style in yo ur page.
Typically, you'll do this to link to  a file co ntaining style that is us ed for m ultiple pages, and then define a few rules in
your HTML file that apply to that file only.
Using the Style Attribute
There is  one other way to define style fo r an HTML elem ent; yo u might remem ber this from the beginning of the cours e.
You can use the st yle attribute directly in an HTML element to define s tyle. Let's add a CSS rule to the <p> element.
Modify your code as shown:
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Use C# Demo to Sign Your PDF Document.
pdf form save in reader; how to fill out pdf forms in reader
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET. Related Resources. To view, convert, edit, process, protect, sign PDF files, please refer to XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET overview.
extract data from pdf form fields; how to save fillable pdf form in reader
CODE TO TYPE:
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title> My Home Page </title>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="homepage.css">
</head>
<body>
<div class="grey" id="header">
<h1>Ramblin' Times</h1>
<h2>My Home Page</h2>
</div>
<div id="content">
<p style="font-style: italic;">
My favorite live rock bands:
</p>
<ul>
<li>Phish</li>
<li>Blues Traveler</li>
<li>Widespread Panic</li>
<li>Pink Floyd</li>
<li>Rolling Stones</li>
</ul>
</div>
</body>
</html>
In general, you'll want to  avoid using the st yle  attribute and defining style rules  directly in elem ents. It's easier to read
and keep track o f your CSS if yo u put all your rules in a <style> element at the top of yo ur page, or put all your CSS in a
separate file and link to  that file using the <link> element. Feel free to experiment with the style attribute now.
After all of that pratice, I'm pretty confident that you're comfo rtable with the s yntax o f CSS. (If you're not, keep experimenting, and
play around with CSS until you are!) In the next less on, we'll learn m ore abo ut block and inline elem ents and how you can
modify their default s tyles us ing CSS.
Copyright © 1998-2014 O'Reilly Media, Inc.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/legalcode
for more information.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create To view, convert, edit, process, built, sign Word documents, please refer to
exporting pdf data to excel; extract data from pdf form
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Use VB.NET Demo to Sign Your PDF Document. Add necessary references:
sign pdf form reader; how to save a pdf form in reader
Cascading Style Sheets: The Box Model
Les son Objectives
When you co mplete this les son, yo u will be able to :
Us e padding, margins, and border for your content.
Padding, Margins, and Border for Your Content
Every HTML element has three CSS pro perties  that determine the spacing aro und it: padding, margins , and bo rder.
These properties can be set to 0 (the default) s o you can't see them, but you can always change that with CSS style.
Before we look at exactly how padding, margin, and bo rder wo rk, let's create an exam ple. Create a new HTML file and
add this  HTML:
CODE TO TYPE:
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<title>My Home Page</title>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="cssbox.css">
</head>
<body>
<div id="content">
<h1>My favorite activities</h1>
<h2><time datetime="2011-09-09">Friday, September 9, 2011</time></h2>
<p>
I <em>love</em> getting out into the great outdoors. Here are
some of my <strong>absolute</strong> favorite things to do.
</p>
<ul>
<li>Hiking</li>
<li>Kayaking</li>
<li>Cycling</li>
<li>Beach walks</li>
</ul>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Save it in your /ht mlcss1 folder and click 
to see how it looks without any added style (although you're
linking to a stylesheet file with < link re l="st ylesheet " href = "cssbo x.css" >, you'll see the default style fo r the page
because the file doesn't yet exis t).
Next, create a new file and select the CSS syntax, and type the code shown:
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff Add a new Form Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign.
export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet; how to extract data from pdf file using java
How to C#: Quick to Start Using XImage.Raster
project’s reference. Add a new Form Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign. Make the ToolBox view show. Right click
extracting data from pdf forms; save pdf forms in reader
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
}
Save it in your /ht mlcss1 folder as cssbox.css. Now, preview your HTML again and you'll see boxes around each
element:
The borders of the block elements, like <h1>, <h2> and <p> go  all the way to the right s ide of the page, becaus e the
block elements  take up the full width of the page. Conversely, the borders around the inline elements <em> and
<strong> don't go all the way to  the far right side of the page; those bo rders hug the elements  tightly because inline
elements flow "in line" with the rest of the content.
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
extract pdf data to excel; export pdf data to excel
How to C#: Create a Winforms Control
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff Add a new Form Item to the project, and choose to design mode sign.
extract data from pdf file; extract data from pdf
Note
We combined the rules for two elem ents, <em> and <strong> into o ne rule by separating the selectors
(tag names) with a comma. If you're using the same rule fo r two or more elements , you can combine
them  like that.
Now take a look at the s pacing inside and outs ide of the borders. The <ul> element (in blue) has som e space between
the bullets and the left s ide of the element where you s ee the border, but the <h1> and <h2> elements  don't.
Okay, now you're ready to take on padding and margins. Update your CSS to add som e padding to the <h1> element:
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
padding: 10px;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
}
Click 
. Yo u should now see extra space on the left, top, and bottom of the elem ent between the element
content and the border. Try resizing your brows er window so it's smaller than the width of the heading. The 10  pixels of
padding is applied all around the heading; you'll see it on the right side too. Try adding padding to the <p> element to o:
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
padding: 10px;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
padding: 10px;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
}
Click 
. Yo u'll see space added to  the <p> element.
We've used "px" a few times so  far. "px" stands  for pixels and is one o f several different ways  you can specify sizes in
CSS. Co mputer monito rs can range fro m 800 pixels wide by 6 00 pixels high, up to thousands of pixels in height and
width. A pixel is  one sm all dot o f color on the m onitor; they allo w you have fine-grained contro l over the appearance of
your elements.
Before we take a closer look at how padding, m argins, and bo rder work more precisely, let's add a m argin to  your lis t
item elements:
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
padding: 10px;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}  
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
padding: 10px;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
margin-top: 20px;
}
Click 
. Do you see additional space abo ve each list item ? Notice that the space is outside the border,
not inside, like it was when we added padding?
Okay, enough playing. What are padding, margins, and border really? The CSS Box Model determines  the spacing
around elements, and it is defined by padding, margins , and bo rder, like this:
The content (the text or image in your element) sits in the middle of the box. The padding is the spacing between the
content and the border of the element. For many elements, the default padding is 0 or a small amount. Then comes the
border, again us ually 0  by default. The margin, which is  the spacing outside the border, between the elements .
Typically block elements like <h1> and <p> have a small default margin to add a little s pace between them.
Having Fun with Padding, Margins and Border
Now that you know abo ut padding, margins, let's have some m ore fun with them!
First, let's try co loring the background o f an element again so you can see mo re clearly what's  going on. Update your
CSS to add a background color of light purple to your <h1> element (and remo ve the padding).
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
padding: 10px;
background-color: #ccccff;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}  
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
padding: 10px;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
margin-top: 20px;
}
Click 
. Notice that the background color goes all the way to the border o f the element. Try adding some
padding back in to your <h1>:
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
background-color: #ccccff;
padding: 10px;
}
h2 {
border: 1px solid green;
}  
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
padding: 10px;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
margin-top: 20px;
}
Click 
again. The background co lor of an element includes the s pace the content is in, as well as the
padding space.
Now try this:
CODE TO TYPE:
h1 {
border: 1px solid grey;
background-color: #ccccff;
padding: 10px;
}
h2 {
border-bottom3px solid green;
p {
border: 1px solid purple;
padding: 10px;
}
em, strong {
border: 2px dashed black;
}
ul {
border: 1px solid blue;
}
li {
border: 1px solid red;
margin-top: 20px;
}
Click 
. The <h2> element now has a green line under it rather than a bo rder all the way around it, and it is
thicker (3 pixels ). The border-bot t om  property sets the botto m border only, rather than the entire bo rder, like when
we used borde r. You'll probably see that this gives yo u a lot o f contro l over what your borders look like—yo u can
control each side separately, o r all sides together. The properties you use to do this are: border-t op, borde r-right ,
border-bot t o m, and border-lef t  (and the s ame applies to margins  and padding).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested