c# pdfsharp sample : Fill in pdf form reader SDK control API .net web page windows sharepoint laclavik_ie_cai_final2-part1330

EmailAnalysisandInformationExtraction forEnterpriseBenefit
1021
Voting, Geo and Email Social Network Search h modules s are implemented as
prototypes.FortherestofthemoduleswehavetestedIEonemailsofoneormore
enterprises.Inthispaper(Figure4)weusedtheGeomoduleandearlyprototypes
of simple modules. . Hint t templates s presented in n Section n 3.1will l be covered by
the final prototype of the generic hint t module in future. . When n all the e needed
objectsaredetected,thehintactioncanbedefined byanURLpointingtosome
existingweb-based system. . Functionalityfor r dozens of hintscanbecreatedand
implementedinafewhours. Customizationoftheinformationextractionismore
difficult(Section4.1)butcanalsobeaccomplishedinareasonabletime-frame.We
discussthisinthenextsection.
4EVALUATIONEXPERIMENTS
InthissectionwedescribetherelevanceandcustomizationevaluationofourInfor-
mationExtractionapproach.Wealsodiscussexperimentsonsocialnetworksformed
fromthehierarchicaltreesandtheresultsofthespreadofactivationinferencein
suchnetworks.Wedonotevaluatethesystemasawhole,butweevaluatejustmain
emailanalysisandinformationextractionapproachesdescribedinSection2.
• Sincebuildingofpatternsforkey-valuepairextractionisamanualprocess,we
evaluatethecustomizationprocessofkey-valuepairextraction.SeeSection4.1.
• Wealsoevaluatesuccess rateofsuch h extractiononselectedobjecttypessuch
aspeoplenames,addressesandtelephonenumbers.SeeSection4.2.
• Semantic trees are not directly evaluated. . They y have been found d helpfulin
contextualrecommendationandtheyarealsoneededinsocialnetworkrelation
inference. ItsevaluationisgiveninSection4.3.
4.1InformationExtraction CustomizationandExperiments
Inthis sectionwedescribehowtheproposedapproachfor IEcan becustomized
foraspecificenterpriseorapplication. Wehaveconductedseveralexperimentsin
theCommiusandAIIAprojects,wheretheseinformationextractiontoolsarebeing
extendedanddeveloped.
The AIIA project focuses on twoapplications: : Anasoft t helpdesk, , where the
products,modulesandcomponentsmentionedintheemailareidentified,andanap-
propriatecontactperson withintheorganizationischosentodealwiththeemail.
Automaticidentificationofthecustomercontactdetails is performed in order to
retrievetheCRMinformationrelatedtothecustomerorchangerequest. These-
condapplicationisinSANET–theacademicinternetprovider. Thefocusis s on
document- andtask-related votingthrough email, , in n which the contacts,people,
agreementsanddocumentsneedtobeidentified.
TheCommiusprojectfocusesontheenterpriseinteroperabilityforSMEs.Itis
importanttoextractorganizations,people,productsortransactionsfromtheorders
andinvoicestransmittedviaemail.
Fill in pdf form reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
using pdf forms to collect data; html form output to pdf
Fill in pdf form reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
export pdf data to excel; extract pdf data into excel
1022
M.Laclav´ık,
ˇ
S.Dlugolinsk´y,M.
ˇ
Seleng,M.Kvassay,E.Gatial,Z.Balogh,L.Hluch´y
InthefirstexperimentinAnasoft,wehaveannotatedHelpdeskemails.Manual
annotationswerecreatedwiththeOnteatool,whichsupportsthiskindoftask.Tags
werecreatedbytheauthorsofthisarticle(2people),companyexpert(1person)as
wellasrealHelpdeskworker(1person). Wehaveselected15emailswhere93tags
werecreated.
ManualannotationswerealsotestedintheCommiusprojectwhereseveralanno-
tationeventswereorganizedinItalyandSpain.InItalySofteco,AitekandTechfin
SMEs wereinvolved. . In n Spain,Fedit technologycenterwas involved. . Thefocus
ofCommiusannotation eventswason thebusiness aspectsofperceivingand de-
composingobjectsaswellasontheirmappingonUN/CEFACTCoreComponent12
interoperabilitystandard.ResultsareavailableintheCommiusdeliverable[27]and
alsoinanarticleinthisCAIjournalissue[28]. Thefirstroundofexperimentsled
us tothe definition of the followingcustomizationprocess and tochanges in the
Onteatoolinordertosupportit. Webelievetheprocessisvalidforanyenterprise
applicationwhereIEisneeded:
1. Emails/filesbrowsing,thestepperformedbytheapplicationusersandthede-
veloper.
2. Definitionoftheobjectstypesandpropertiestobeextracted,thestepperformed
bytheapplicationusersandthedeveloper.
3. Implementationofthepatternsfortheobjects,performedbythedeveloper.
4. Transfer of automatically extractedentities s tomanual annotation mode. . The
application user r then n does s not have e to spend d too much h time by annotating
emails,he/shejustaddsthemissedtagsanddeletesthesuperfluousones.
5. Manualannotationperformedbytheapplicationuser.Itisusefulifthedeveloper
watchestheprocess.
6. Ifwewanttoachievehighconsistency,precisionandrecall,severalusersshould
annotatethesamesetofemails.
7. Automaticannotationevaluationusingtheprecisionandrecallmeasures,orjust
visualevaluationinthetoolbybrowsingtheemails/fileswiththediscoveredtags
(asinFigure1).
Inthesubsequentannotationeventsandexperimentsthisprocesswasfoundto
bevalidand useful. . In n thecontextofAnasoftapplicationwehaveidentifiedthe
followingobjectstobeextractedinthesecondstepofthecustomizationprocess:
• Organization:org:Name,org:RegistrationNo,org:TaxRegistrationNo
• Person: person:Name,person:Function
• Contactinfo:contact:Phone,contact:Email,contact:Webpage
• Address:address:ZIP,address:Street,address:Settlement
• Product:product:Name,product:Module,product:Component
12
http://www.unece.org/cefact/ebxml/CCTS_V2-01_Final.pdf
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
flatten pdf form in reader; fill in pdf form reader
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
A professional PDF form filler control able to be integrated in Visual Studio .NET WinForm and fill in PDF form use C# language.
collect data from pdf forms; extract data out of pdf file
Email Analysis and Information Extraction for Enterprise Benefit
1023
• Document: doc:Invoice, doc:Order, doc:Contract, doc:ChangeRequest
• Inventory (rooms, computers, ...): inventory:ResID, inventory:ResType
• Other business object: bo:ID, bo:Type.
These objects are quite interesting and common for many enterprises, but only
several of them (such as address, organization, contact or person) can be detected
by the same patterns across enterprises. Of course, different patterns need to be
defined for different languages. Patterns for products or business documents need
to be defined for each enterprise. In addition, products are usually discovered us-
ing gazetteers. While the definition of objects and patterns can take just several
hours, sometimes a bigger effort is required to create gazetteers (lists of products
or services). Gazetteers need to be created manually or extracted from the com-
pany information systems if available. It is hard to estimate how much effort we
have spent customizing the Anasoft Helpdesk application in the first round of ex-
periments, since the customization process was not defined at that point in time,
but in the second round (when the customization process was already defined and
followed) the first step took us about 2 hours and the second step together with the
seventh took us 3 hours.
In the SANET application, we have developed the Voting module. For this
module, it was clear from the beginning what kind of objects needed to be detected
in the emails: people, voting agreement, subject of email. Thus, not all the process
steps were applied. The first and second steps were done within one hour. The third
step was accomplished within 4 hours including the seventh evaluation step done
only visually on about 100 emails. We found 2–3 emails that were problematic with
regard to agreement detection. The voting module currently supports the agreement
detection in Slovak language only.
Concerning the contact module, we have evaluated the contact detection on
Spanish emails of the Fedit technology center. Basically all the needed steps (1, 3
and visually step 7) were performed by the developer, since the second step was given
by the address structure: street name, number, ZIP code and city name. It took
about 5 hours to create and fine-tune the address extraction patterns on 104 Spanish
emails from Fedit, with 82–100 % precision and 81–94% recall depending on the
object type, which is reported in 4.2 in detail.
4.1.1 Customization Conclusion
Since the described customization process is manual (but supported by Ontea tool),
we have provided this evaluation. It shows that customization for a small enterprise
can be done in reasonable time. The provided tests were small so this can raise
questions on scalability. In case of SANET application, we have run tests on larger
email sets (more than 500 emails) and the results were satisfactory. We believe the
relevance of extracted information can be improved also by allowing user to mark
not discovered or wrongly discovered results directly in the email. This will be the
focus of our future work.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
how to type into a pdf form in reader; how to extract data from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to fill pdf form in reader; extracting data from pdf to excel
1024
M. Laclav´ık,
ˇ
S. Dlugolinsk´y, M.
ˇ
Seleng, M. Kvassay, E. Gatial, Z. Balogh, L. Hluch´y
4.2 Relevance Evaluation of Information Extraction
The point of interest in the relevance evaluation of information extraction from
emails was the extraction of personal names, postal addresses and telephone numbers
since such entities can be used in any enterprise, and patterns can be reused/shared
among enterprises. To conduct the experiment, we have selected a subset of 50
Spanish emails in which we manually annotated these kinds of named entities in
order to have a so-called golden standard for evaluation. We then evaluated the
extraction results automatically by comparing them to manual annotations. We
considered the information extraction result to be relevant, when it was strictly
equal to the corresponding manual annotation. It means the automatic result and
the manual annotation must have occupied exactly the same position in the email
text. The evaluation results are summarized in the table below.
Type
Total
Total
Relevant
Recall Precision
F1
relevant extracted
extracted
[%]
[%]
[%]
Personal name
779
788
499
64.06
63.32
63.69
Telephone number
262
178
166
63.36
93.26
75.45
Fax Number
139
127
121
87.05
95.28
90.98
Postal address
170
134
75
44.12
55.97
49.34
Table 3. Evaluation of information extraction from emails (strict match)
As we can see in Table 3, the results except for the fax number and telephone
number extraction are not high. This is due to strict comparison of the extraction
results against the annotated set, where many good results were rejected. For ex-
ample, there were many cases where the extracted name was almost equal to the
annotated one, but it differed from annotation by prefix D. Although this prefix
could be considered as an abbreviation of the first name, in our situation it stands
for Spanish Don (Sir), and it was not included in the manual annotations since we
did not consider the title to be a part of personal name. Postal addresses suffered
from similar drawbacks: they were written in various formats, so many were ex-
tracted partially or not at all. Partially extracted addresses were classified as false
matches. For example, if only a postal code with a city name was extracted from the
whole address, it was a false match, although the postal code and city were located
correctly. The same problem was with telephone numbers. There were many extrac-
tions, which were not identical but overlapped the manually annotated telephone
numbers. This made us search for alternative ways of evaluation that would reflect
these partial successes as well.
In the second evaluation, we considered the information extraction result to be
relevant when it intersected the manual annotation. The results of evaluation were
much better (Table 4) and showed us that if we enhance the information extraction
from emails, we can significantly improve the recall and precision. It would also
improve the performance of our social network extractor, since it operates on the
results of information extraction.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
html form output to pdf; extract data from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
collect data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf forms
Email Analysis and Information Extraction for Enterprise Benefit
1025
Type
Total
Total
Relevant
Recall Precision
F1
relevant extracted
extracted
[%]
[%]
[%]
Personal name
779
788
672
86.26
85.28
85.77
Telephone number
262
178
178
67.94
100.00
80.91
Fax Number
139
127
125
89.93
98.43
93.98
Postal address
170
134
133
78.24
99.25
87.50
Table 4. Evaluation of information extraction from emails (intersect match)
4.3 Social Network Evaluation
In this section we evaluate spreading activation inference algorithm on task of as-
signing phone numbers to persons. For both the personal names and phone numbers
the social network extractor depended on the information extractor (IE). Its only
responsibility was to correctly assign the received phone numbers to the received
personal names. This difference in the task (compared to IE) necessitated a differ-
ent evaluation methodology. Our evaluation of social network extractor focused on
user needs and was inspired by the approach used to evaluate the TREC 2006 En-
terprise Track in [30]. In our case, the user needs are defined as the ability to extract
attributes (phone numbers) and assign them correctly to primary entities (persons).
It is not necessary to have all the occurrences of each attribute value or primary
entity identified in the email archive. It is acceptable that some occurrences are
missed as long as each unique attribute value is identified somewhere, and correctly
assigned to its proper primary entity. While the extraction of telephone numbers
was fairly straightforward, a number of problems resurfaced during the extraction
of personal names. Spanish personal names often consisted of four components,
which the writers seldom spelled out in full. They might use three components
only, and sometimes even two. On top of that, they would sometimes write their
names properly accentuated, but at other times they would write without accents.
We therefore decided to accept as a valid variant of personal name any extracted
string consisting of at least two correctly spelled name components (accents were
not required). The telephone number was considered correctly assigned if any of
the acceptable variants of its owners name appeared as the first or second in the
list of potential “owners” sorted by score. The results are summarized in the tables
below. The number of telephone numbers in Table 5 differs from that in Table 3,
because Table 5 represents only the unique telephone numbers for the whole test set
of 50 emails, and not all occurences of telephone numbers in emails. Moreover, the
telephone numbers were re-formatted by leaving only numeric characters in them,
before they were added into the social graph.
Out of 42 relevant unique phone numbers in the test corpus (and 32 phone
numbers actually extracted), two occurred in the emails that did not contain any
personal name (only company name was present). These two were then irrelevant for
the task of pairing phones and personal names; this is summarized in Table 6. Since
there were 40 relevant unique phone numbers, we expected 40 correct pairs consisting
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
pdf form save with reader; how to fill pdf form in reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; how to make pdf editable form reader
1026
M. Laclav´ık,
ˇ
S. Dlugolinsk´y, M.
ˇ
Seleng, M. Kvassay, E. Gatial, Z. Balogh, L. Hluch´y
Total
Total Relevant Recall Precision
relevant found
found
[%]
[%]
42
32
29
69
90.6
Table 5. Quantitative evaluation of the extraction of telephone numbers for social network
reconstruction
of a phone number and a personal name. This was for us the Total relevant for the
pairing task. The number of assigned pairs (shown in the Total Found column) is
now 30, since it excludes the two irrelevant phone numbers. The number of correctly
assigned phones to persons is shown in the Relevant found column.
Total
Total Relevant Recall Precision
relevant found
found
[%]
[%]
40
30
18
45
60
Table 6. Quantitative evaluation of the assignment of phones to personal names
Table 6 implies that out of 30 found pairs, 12 were wrong. Out of these, 6 were
caused by the fact that the Information Extractor failed to extract the name of the
person that actually “owned” the phone number. Further 3 errors were caused by the
extractionof wrong (corrupted) phone numbers, as is implied by Table 5. This means
that out of 21 pairs which the social network extractor could possibly pair correctly,
it only failed 3 times. This would give the theoretical precision of 18/21 = 85.7 %,
which demonstrates the potential of spreading activation in reconstructing social
networks. The immediate conclusion is that we need to focus primarily on improving
the quality of the information extraction of text-based data in multilingual contexts.
4.3.1 Social Networks Summary
In contrast to [26], where we tested our prototype on a set of 28 emails written in
English, we now tested it on a set of 50 emails written in Spanish, supplied by our
Commius project partner, Fedit. Spanish emails, with their accented characters and
differing cultural norms (e.g. varying ways of writing personal names) represented
a challenge that made a number of hidden issues visible in our prototype code.
Some of them were solved on the fly, but other require a substantial redesign of the
information extraction strategy. The 60 % precision of the social network extraction
is less than what we obtained with English emails in [26] (precision of 77 %), but
there are clear possibilities for improvement, especially at the information extraction
stage. Spreading activation can deal with the lower precision of the information
extractionbut cannot cope with low recall, i.e. the situations when something needed
was not extracted. In this respect, the main opportunity for improvement lies in
making the partially good results of the information extraction (summarized in
Table 4) available for the social network extractor, since now only strict IE results
(shown in Table 3) are really exploited for social network reconstruction.
Email Analysis and Information Extraction for Enterprise Benefit
1027
4.4 Evaluation Experiments Conclusion
To conclude, the success rate (precision and recall) of the Ontea IE is quite high
which reflects our previous evaluations on web documents [25] as well as our present
evaluation in Table 4, where the F1 measure for the intersect match was above 80 %
in all cases. The developer fine-tunes the patterns and gazetteers on the target email
data set in a given enterprise, and so achieves good results. We have also proved
that the approach can be customized for enterprise applications in a reasonable
time-frame of several hours, provided the customization is conducted by the person
skilled in regular expressions.
5CONCLUSION
We have developed a solution for simple and customizable processing of email mes-
sages with focus on enterprise emails. We believe the work described can be used
in many applications in enterprise or community environment, such as knowledge
management, social networks, information management or enterprise interoperabi-
lity.
In the article, we have discussed our experiments with the customization of the
information extraction in several enterprises and organizations. In future we plan to
extend the solution with an easy user interface for user interaction with extracted
data, setting up the application-specific patterns for the information extraction, hint
creation and evaluation. We believe that enterprises can benefit from the proposed
approach from the day one of the system installation by offering simple functionality
such as search for related objects, catch a contact or show information about orga-
nizations/people. Enterprises that want to benefit from their email archives more
substantially need to customize the system. Our experiments have shown that it is
possible to customize it in a reasonable time-frame.
In this paper we have also discussed the email social network extraction, which
employs the spreading activation algorithm on the information extraction results.
We have shown that reasonable relations among business objects can be discovered
based on the information hidden in the email archives. Such information can be used
to populate the empty enterprise databases when installing a new information sys-
tem, CRM, BPM or Help Desk. We have also shown the use of email social networks
on the Email Social Network Search prototype, which exploits multi-dimensional so-
cial networks for exploring various object-to-object or object-attribute relations.
Acknowledgment
This work is partially supported by projects AIIA APVV-0216-07, Commius FP7-
213876, APVV DO7RP-0005-08, SMART ITMS: 26240120005, SMART II ITMS:
26240120029, VEGA 2/0184/10. We would also like to thank Anasoft, Fedit, Aitek,
Softeco, Techfin and SANET for providing us with emails for testing, and for their
support with the customization of the information extraction process.
1028
M. Laclav´ık,
ˇ
S. Dlugolinsk´y, M.
ˇ
Seleng, M. Kvassay, E. Gatial, Z. Balogh, L. Hluch´y
REFERENCES
[1] PewInternet Report: Online Activities 2010. May 2010, http://tinyurl.com/
pewOnline10.
[2] Madden, M.—Jones, S.: Networked Workers. PewInternet report, Pew Research
Center; September 24, 2008, http://tinyurl.com/pewNetWrks08.
[3] HP, The Radicati Group, Inc.: Taming the Growth of Email – An ROI Analysis
(White Paper), 2005, http://tinyurl.com/RadicatiEmail05.
[4] Jones, J.: Gallup: Almost All E-Mail Users Say Internet, E-Mail Have Made Lives
Better. 2001, http://tinyurl.com/Gallup01.
[5] The Radicati Group, Inc.: Email Statistics Report, 2010; Editor: Sara Radicati;
http://tinyurl.com/RadicatiEmail10.
[6] META Group Inc.: 80 % of Users Prefer E-Mail as Business Communication Tool.
2003, http://tinyurl.com/MetaEmail03.
[7] Whittaker, S.—Sidner, C.: Email Overload: Exploring Personal Information
Management of Email. In Proceedings of ACM CHI96, pp. 276–283, 1996.
[8] Fisher, D.—Brush, A. J.—Gleave, E.—Smith, M. A.: Revisiting Whit-
taker &Sidner’s “Email Overload” Ten Years Later. In CSCW2006, New York ACM
Press 2006.
[9] Laclav
´
ık, M.—Maynard, D.: Motivating Intelligent Email in Business: An In-
vestigation Into Current Trends for Email Processing and Communication Research.
In E3C Workshop; IEEE Conference on Commerce and Enterprise Computing; DOI
10.1109/CEC.2009.47, 2009, pp. 476–482.
[10] Balzert,
S.—Burkhart,
T.—Kalaboukas,
K.—Carpenter,
M.—
Laclav
´
ık, M.—Marin, C.—Mehandjiev, N.—Sonnhalter, K.—Ziemann, J.:
Appendix to D2.1.2: State of the Art in Interoperability Technology, Commius
project deliverable (2009), http://tinyurl.com/CommiusSoTA.
[11] McDowell, L.—Etzioni, O.—Halevy, A.—Levy, H.: Semantic Email. in-
WWW’04: Proceedings of the 13th international conference on World Wide Web.
New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2004, pp. 244–254.
[12] Scerri, S. et al.: Improving Email Conversation Efficiency through Semantically
Enhanced Email. In: 18
th
International Conference on Database and Expert Systems
Applications, IEEE Computer Society 2007, pp. 490–494.
[13] Klimt, B.—Yang, Y.: Introducing the Enron Corpus. CEAS, 2004, http://www.
ceas.cc/papers-2004/168.pdf, http://www.cs.cmu.edu/
~
enron/.
[14] Carvalho, V. R.—Cohen, W. W.: On the Collective Classification of Email
“Speech Acts”. In: SIGIR ’05: Proceedings of the 28th annual international ACM
SIGIR conference on research and development in information retrieval, New York,
ACM 2006, pp. 345–352.
[15] Bird, C.—Gourley, A.—Devanbu, P.—Gertz, M.—Swaminathan, A.: Min-
ing Email Social Networks. In: MSR ’06: Proceedings of the 2006 International Work-
shop on Mining Software Repositories, ACM, New York 2006, pp. 137–143.
[16] Culotta, A.—Bekkerman, R.—McCallum, A.: Extracting Social Networks
and Contact Information from Email and the Web. In: CEAS ’04: Proceedings
Email Analysis and Information Extraction for Enterprise Benefit
1029
of the First Conference on Email and Anti-Spam 2004, http://www.ceas.cc/
papers-2004/176.pdf.
[17] Laclav
´
ık, M.—
ˇ
Seleng, M.—Ciglan, M.—Hluch
´
y, L.: Supporting Collabora-
tion by Large Scale Email Analysis. In: Cracow ’08 Grid Workshop: Proceedings,
Academic Computer Centre CYFRONET AGH, Krak´ow 2009, pp. 382–387, ISBN
978-83-61433-00-2.
[18] Diehl, C. P.—Namata, G.—Getoor, L.: Relationship Identification for Social
Network Discovery. In: The AAAI 2008 Workshop on Enhanced Messaging, 2008.
[19] Judge, J.—Sogrin, M.—Troussov, A.: Galaxy: IBM Ontological Network
Miner. In: 1
st
Conference on Social Semantic Web, Volume P-113 of Lecture Notes
in Informatics (LNI) series (ISSN 16175468, ISBN 9783-88579207-9), 2007.
[20] Cunningham, H.: Information Extraction, Automatic. In: Keith Brown (Editor-
in-Chief), Encyclopedia of Language& Linguistics, Second Edition: Elsevier Oxford,
Volume 5, pp. 665–677.
[21] Cunningham, H.—Maynard, D.—Bontcheva, K.—Tablan, V.: GATE:
AFramework and Graphical Development Environment for Robust NLP Tools and
Applications. Proceedings of the 40th Anniversary Meeting of the Association for
Computational Linguistics (ACL ’02), Philadelphia.
[22] Kiryakov, A.—Popov, B.—Terziev, I.—Manov, D.—Ognyanoff, D.: Se-
mantic Annotation, Indexing, and Retrieval. Elsevier’s Journal of Web Semantics,
Vol. 2, 2005, No. 1, http://www.ontotext.com/kim/semanticannotation.html.
[23] Cimiano, P.—Ladwig, G.—Staab, S.: Gimme’ the Context: Context-Driven
Automatic Semantic Annotation With C-Pankow. In WWW’05: Proceedings of the
14
th
international conference on World Wide Web, New York, NY, USA. ACM Press.
ISBN 1-59593-046-9, 2005, pp. 332–341.
[24] Etzioni, O.—Cafarella, M.—Downey, D.—Kok, S.—Popescu, A.—
Shaked, T.—Soderland, S.—Weld, D.—Yates, A.: Web-Scale Information
Extraction in Knowitall (Preliminary Results). In WWW’04, 2004, pp. 100–110,
http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/988672.988687.
[25] Laclav
´
ık, M.—
ˇ
Seleng, M.—Ciglan, M.—Hluch
´
y, L.: Ontea: Platform for
Pattern Based Automated Semantic Annotation. Computing and Informatics, Vol. 28,
2009, pp. 555–579.
[26] Kvassay, M.—Laclav
´
ık, M.—Dlugolinsk
´
y,
ˇ
S.: Reconstructing Social Networks
from Emails. In: Pokorn´y, J., Sn´a
ˇ
Sel, V., Richta, K. (Eds.): DATESO’10, 2010,
pp. 50–59, ISBN 978-80-7378-116-3.
[27] Mehandjiev, N.—Gouvas, P.—Marin, C.: D5.3.1 Visual Mapping Tool (initial
version). Commius project deliverable, www.commius.eu, 2009.
[28] Marin, C. A.—Carpenter, M.—Wajid, U.—Mehandjiev, N.: Devolved On-
tology in Practice for a Seamless Semantic Alignment within Dynamic Collaboration
Networks of SMEs. In Computing and Informatics, Vol. 30, 2011, No. 1, pp. xxx–xxx.
[29] Burkhart, T.—Werth, D.—Loos, P.—Dorn, C.: A Flexible Approach To-
wards Self-Adapting Process Recommendations. In Computing and Informatics,
Vol. 30, 2011, No. 1, pp. xxx–xxx.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested