itextsharp pdf to text c# : Fill in pdf form reader application SDK tool html wpf asp.net online op2-part1578

21
Figure 8.  15 tonne forwarder with front dual wheels and rear bogie axle fitted with wide band-tracks 
(NGP ca. 33 kPa unladen; 56 kPa with 10 t load)  
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
Figure 9. Traffic damage to soft soils (i.e. Low GBC soils) 
(a)  despite the availability of sufficient brash, rutting can eventually become a problem on the main extraction 
routes, as the brash becomes degraded by the excessive traffic. In this case, considerable rutting occurred 
after 50 passes of a 10.5 t tracked forwarder (NGP < 30 kPa unladen; 40 kPa with 8 t load) along the main 
extraction trail even though sufficient brash was available (as evidenced by broken stems);  
(b)  rutting after 10 passes of a wheeled forwarder (NGP ca. 70 kPa with 8 t load) along a main extraction trail 
comprising a shallow L-GBC gley soil (0.4 m) overlying solid foundation;  
(c)  channelling of surface water along rutted trails presents a significant risk of run off into local waterways; 
(d)  ponding, which  confines the water  to  a  given  area,  presents no  significant  run  off  risk.  However,  it 
interrupts the normal water flow and consequently the drainage patterns on a harvesting site. This can lead 
to zones that are too soft for machines to traverse. 
Injudicious selection  and  operation  of  machinery  systems  can  cause  quite  severe  soil  damage,  leading  to 
increased risk of run off into waterways (Figure 9). The aim of a harvest plan is to control and monitor the 
harvest operation in order to ensure that the standard of work is of a high quality and also to reduce the risk of 
damage to the site and residual stand.  However, practical difficulties may arise beyond the scope of the harvest 
Fill in pdf form reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
exporting pdf form to excel; sign pdf form reader
Fill in pdf form reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
save data in pdf form reader; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
22
plan. Figure 10 shows how even if a machine is correctly selected to suit the  site,  heavy  rainfall prior to 
harvesting operations can alter the situation.  However, it is important that machine width is taken into account 
when selecting high flotation systems, as excessively wide machines may be difficult to manoeuvre within the 
forest, particularly during thinning operations (Figure 11). 
Figure 10.  Damage to soil even after the harvest plan has matched machine to site, due to exceptionally wet 
summer weather and scarcity of brash mat at this particular location. 
Figure 11.  10.5 tonne forwarder fitted with dual tyres and band tracks enables low nominal ground pressures 
(<30 kPa with an 8 t load) to be achieved. However its excess width may cause damage to the residual stand, as 
seen in the photograph on the left where considerable bark damage has occurred.
2.4.2  Machine immobilisation  
Under very soft conditions (e.g. ground bearing capacity < 40 kPa) it is particularly important that machines with 
low nominal ground pressures are used (e.g. tracked machines or machines fitted with 8 wheels, flotation tyres 
and band tracks).  Failure to do so can result in machines becoming bogged down, and in severe cases extremely 
difficult to harvest and extract (Figures 12 and 13). While brash mat will help counteract sinkage, it cannot 
compensate fully on very soft soil  (Figure 12). 
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; extract table data from pdf
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
A professional PDF form filler control able to be integrated in Visual Studio .NET WinForm and fill in PDF form use C# language.
using pdf forms to collect data; flatten pdf form in reader
23
Figure 12.  Even with the use of brash mat, soil water presents the most significant constraint to machine 
flotation and mobility. In this case, a light weight (10.8 t) 4-wheeled harvester (NGP 
60 kPa) was incapable of 
operating on a low GBC soil.  
Figure 13. Forwarder (600 mm wide tyres, 8 t load, NGP ca 70 kPa) operating on a waterlogged site (L-GBC) 
with a shallow (<700 mm depth) solid foundation. The machine caused severe rutting as it sank right down to 
the underlying solid stratum – see also Figure 9(b). 
2.5 Cost considerations 
Work-study allows for objective and systematic examination of all factors which govern operational efficiency 
in order to effect improvement.  With respect to forest machines, work-study may lead to improvements in forest 
harvesting procedures and planning for the necessary access locations during establishment of forest stands.  For 
example, for the key machine time elements of wood harvesting systems, the typical functional processing times 
may be generated to evaluate machine productivity as illustrated in Figure 14 (Spinelli et al, 2002
2
).  Based on 
realistic cost factors, the associated harvesting costs may be derived (see Figure 15, Spinelli et al, 2002
2 &3
).  
2
Spinelli, R., P.M.O. Owende and S.M. Ward. 2002. Productivity and cost of CTL harvesting-debarking of fast-growing Eucalyptus 
globulus stands using excavator based harvesters. Forest Products Journal 52(1): 67-77. 
3
Spinelli, R., B. Hartsough, P. M. O. Owende and S.M. Ward. 2002. Mechanised full-tree harvesting of fast growing Eucalyptus Sp. stands. 
International Journal of Forest Engineering 13(2): 49 – 60. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; extracting data from pdf forms
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
pdf form data extraction; using pdf forms to collect data
24
(a)Harvest of 2 m logs
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
Tree volume (m
3
)
3Machine productivity (m/PMH)
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
(b) Harvest of 4 m logs
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
Tree volume (m
3
)
3Machine productivity (m/PMH)
Figure 14.  Timber harvester productivity as a function of tree size and form (F
1
to F
5
) for two log size 
categories. 
(a) Harvest of 2 m logs
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
Tree volume (m
3
)
3Harvesting cost ($/m)
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
(b) Harvest of 4 m logs
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
Tree volume (m
3
)
3Harvesting cost ($/m)
Figure 15.  Timber harvesting cost as a function of tree size and form. 
Further details (including software) on cost assessments of harvesting systems are available on the ECOWOOD 
website: www.ucd.ie/~foresteng   
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
pdf data extraction open source; collect data from pdf forms
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
extract data out of pdf file; fill in pdf form reader
25
A burned, eroded stand  
An eroded re-afforested landscape  
A grazed eroded landscape 
Creep stabilisation 
Erosion can be a major problem in dry climates. This can be exacerbated by forest fires and short 
periods of torrential rainfall. The above are some examples of landscapes and practices in 
Mediterranean countries 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
exporting data from pdf to excel; how to make pdf editable form reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
html form output to pdf; how to fill pdf form in reader
26
3. 
M
ACHINE 
T
ELEMETRICS
3.1  Rationale for integrated logistics in procurement of wood 
Mechanised wood harvesting and transport operations are multi-function systems, with a range of complex 
interactions and inter-dependencies.  The overall efficiency of the operations can be optimised by integrating the 
elements in the production chain, thereby leading to more efficient production, better quality and competitively 
priced products.  For example, forests are often located in remote areas with products destined for multiple 
locations, hence harvesting and transportation operations would benefit considerably from integrated logistics. 
Logistics in the wood harvesting chain (source of wood, eco-efficient harvesting and extraction, costing of 
process operations,  wood  quality  grading  and  degradation  during  storage, transportation  requirements  and 
infrastructure, and the potentially dynamic product markets) are complex in the sense that wood procurement, 
active deliveries and production plans are interrelated, as shown in Figure 17. The system is further complicated 
by variable wood assortments (ca. 20 in Finland, 5 in Ireland and Spain, and 3 to 6 in Italy) that must be related 
to  different  processing  techniques  and  markets,  the  varied  range  of  wood  procurement  companies  with 
independent harvesting  schedules and wood  consignments, and  the industry's partial  reliance on favourable 
weather  factors.  Telemetrics  can  enhance  efficient  tracking  of  the  different  wood  assortments,  and  the 
optimisation of the wood harvesting operations, especially cut-to-length harvesting. 
Figure 17.  Components of integrated wood harvesting, extraction and transport. 
27
3.2  Mechanisation systems for wood harvesting 
Modern wood harvesting mechanisation systems are referred to as Cut-to-Length (CTL) systems, and comprise 
two primary machines, a harvester and forwarder.  The harvester fells, de-limbs and cuts the trees into specified 
lengths
(hence Cut-to-Length); while the forwarder collects the logs and transports them to a collection point, for 
road transport by truck.  On-board electronics and telemetric data transfer can control the harvester’s CTL 
function so that the machine produces the optimum assortment of log sizes to match the market (viz. end-user) 
requirements and maximise the profitability of the enterprise.  In addition, the use of telemetric systems (using 
satellite based GPS, GIS navigation, and load cells) to track forwarder movement within the forest can help to 
minimise soil damage and ensure that environmentally sensitive areas are not traversed. This technology can also 
be used to monitor log deliveries to and from the collection points, thereby improving transport scheduling, and 
inventory control and traceability.   
European Union (EU) countries can be classified into three groups, based on the level of wood harvesting 
mechanisation and the application of telemetric systems, as follows: 
• 
High degree of wood harvesting mechanisation, with well developed telemetry use level: Finland;  
• 
High degree of wood harvesting mechanisation, with relatively low telemetry use level: Ireland, Denmark, 
Sweden, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, Austria, and France, and;  
• 
Low degree of wood harvesting mechanisation, with low telemetry use level: Italy, Spain, Portugal, Belgium 
and Greece. 
3.3  Requirements for telemetric data transfer 
Modern on-board data capture and transfer systems require an effective mobile phone network to be in place if 
remote data transfer capability is to be effected. GSM phone systems are available in all EU countries, but 
coverage in forest areas is incomplete in all countries (and quite poor in many), except Finland and Denmark.  
This implies that periodic transmission (e.g. where the operator periodically downloads data via a phone line or 
transfer in PC diskettes) is the only effective data transfer method in many situations.  While such periodic 
transmissions  may  fail  to  capitalise  on  the  full  potential  of  a  truly  real-time  integrated  system,  daily 
communication is adequate in most situations and is a significant improvement on the current regimes. Satellite 
based GPS, and GIS maps are required for the monitoring and routing of machines in the wood harvesting chain.  
GPS signals can be problematic from time to time, but they can be supplemented by dead-reckoning systems, 
which are adequate for most applications. 
State-of-the-art in integrated telemetrics 
Several information software systems are available which can enable the following tasks to be carried out: 
• 
Prepare cutting instructions (in the office) – log size and quality so as to optimise product value  and transfer 
of related instructions via the GSM phone network (real-time) or daily download (batch); 
• 
Prepare detailed GIS maps of the forest and the road network between the forest and the end-users; 
• 
Modify the cutting instructions using stem profile data collected via machine telemetric systems from the 
harvester - the harvester has a real-time tree diameter and length measuring system. While this procedure 
could be carried out in real-time where GSM coverage is available, it is usually sufficient to alter the cutting 
instruction data on a daily basis, hence batch data transmission is usually adequate for this application;  
• 
Maintain an up to date inventory of timber production (either real-time or batch). 
On-board electronics 
All modern harvesters come with on-board data capture and monitoring systems including stem diameter, log 
length  and  data  logging  (usually  PC  based,  which  also  give  the  operator  a  range  of  options  for  value 
optimisation).  
These are usually standard items but the peripheral systems required for data transfer (e.g. GSM transmission 
system, satellite navigation and GIS maps) cost extra.  However, many operators and managers are unfamiliar 
with the full capabilities of current on-board electronic systems, and fail to use most of the systems’ potential. In 
contrast to harvesters, a variable number of forwarders have GPS and GIS hardware, or on-board telemetrics.  In 
the best cases route optimisation systems, based on GPS and GIS, are available and are in use for wood haulage 
trucks. 
28
GIS and GPS play a central role in the planning and management of wood harvesting operations. Current 
technology enables the machine (harvester, forwarder or truck) to have a GIS map on-board and to receive 
information via telemetric data transfer (e.g. using mobile phone transmissions). Such GIS maps can be updated 
or overlaid with new information as it arises. In some cases telemetric transfer may not be feasible (e.g. due to 
poor mobile phone coverage in the area) and hence daily updates may be required (e.g. through land-line phone 
transmissions or on CD). These data  updates can be passed from one  machine to  another (in real time if 
telemetric links are available), thus aiding the overall efficiency of operations. 
Vehicle movements can be tracked and controlled by combining GPS positioning data with map data. For 
example, the “base map” of the harvest site on the harvester’s computer can be updated with information on “no-
go” zones such as heritage areas, soft zones or riparian buffer zones. The operator may be able to use GPS 
position sensing to avoid such areas. Other site features such as winter harvest zones can be identified as can the 
location of landing areas. GIS can play a central role in the planning of within-forest routes in order to ensure 
that soil and stand damage is minimised. Route optimisation models are available to assist in this process. 
Ground truth data will need to be collected prior to completion of the harvest plan, in order to verify conditions 
on the site. In addition, maps can be updated telemetrically during harvesting operations as new features are 
identified (e.g. areas of butt rot in Spruce, exceptionally soft zones, etc); and this information enables subsequent 
operations to take account of these new features. Map detail is important, and clarity of presentation is essential.  
Maps need to give sufficient details to enable the operator to carryout his tasks efficiently yet not overburden 
with too much detail. The use of warning symbols helps improve clarity. 
This GIS map shows a stream (left picture) and its buffer zone (right picture) 
29
Cost of telemetric systems 
Estimates indicate that a fully integrated telemetric system (for the complete wood harvesting chain) would incur 
an expenditure of €25,000 to €45,000, depending on the make and model of system used.  However, some 
elements of these costs may be spread over a number of machines.  The associated variable costs could range 
from 0.01 to 0.1 €/m
3
of harvested wood, depending on the frequency of data transfer, i.e., whether batch or real-
time transmission is adopted. While no cost-benefit analysis of their impact on system efficiency has been 
carried out in the literature, it is expected that the cost benefits would far outweigh the operating costs. In 
addition, the system offers considerable collateral benefits to the environment.  
3.4  Operational benefits 
The key operational benefits of the use of data capture and telemetric systems include: 
• 
Effective scheduling, control and monitoring of operations; 
• 
Improved productivity, reduced labour inputs and increased machine availability; 
• 
On-line data such as parts and service manuals; 
• 
Machine fault diagnosis and service scheduling; 
• 
Machine tracking for operation management and safety; 
• 
Reduced fuel consumption, machine maintenance and down-time; 
• 
Timely delivery of quality logs to the end-users, and; 
• 
Timely updating of databases in the logistics of wood supply. 
3.5  Environmental benefits 
The environmental benefits of the use of data capture and telemetric systems are quite significant. These include: 
• 
The use of on-board GIS maps and satellite navigation to monitor the movements of machines in the forest. 
This assists in certifying that the operations have been carried out in an environmentally compatible manner. 
For example, the machines can be kept away from “no-go” zones such a riparian strips and archaeological 
sites.  In addition, the number of passes can be limited to avoid excessive rutting on soft soils, surface 
scuffing in high erosion risk areas, or tree root damage; 
• 
The efficient use of machines reduces their energy consumption; 
• 
The optimum bucking (viz. cross cutting) of the logs ensures reduced wood wastage, thereby extracting 
maximum product use from the forest, and; 
• 
Truck route optimisation to minimise road damage, consistent with economic efficiency. 
3.6  Recommendations 
The use of data capture and telemetric systems offers considerable environmental and economic benefits in the 
future development of wood harvesting mechanisation within the EU.  This OP advocates the use of such 
telemetric and data capture systems on sensitive sites both for day-to-day operations and production certification. 
The technology exists (albeit with certain deficiencies such as lack of consistent mobile phone coverage and 
satellite signal) but needs to  be  promoted on a pan-EU basis.   Investment in hardware, GIS data quality, 
improved mobile phone coverage and data transmission speeds are key elements in achieving this goal. In 
particular, a partnership approach is needed with the telephone service providers in order to address the latter 
two issues.  Education and training are essential in order to enable the industry to utilise the full potential of the 
technology.  This requires considerable investment in training modules, operator certification schemes, and the 
use  of virtual reality simulators as training and  systems optimisation aids.  A more detailed discussion of 
telemetrics in wood harvesting is given in Kanali et al (2001)
4
4
Kanali, C. L., P. M. O. Owende, J. Lyons and S. M. Ward. 2001. Assessment of on-board Electronics, Operator Assist and Telemetric 
Controls, and Logistical Systems within the Wood harvesting Chain.  Project Deliverable D1 (Work Package No. 2) of the Development of  
Protocol for Eco-efficient  Wood Harvesting on Sensitive Sites (ECOWOOD).  EU 5th Framework Project (Quality of Life and Management 
of Living Resources) Contract No. QLK5-1999-00991 (1999-2002).  92 pp 
30
 R
ECOMMENDED 
P
RACTICE
The practices presented in this OP have two main components,  
(a)  those applicable to all sites (viz. general conditions); and  
(b)  those additional constraints that are site specific. 
The user must consider both components in the application of the protocol to a given site. 
4.1 General recommendations 
The following recommendations apply to all sites (but the user must add to these the site-specific 
components, presented later): 
1.  Every effort must be made to minimise the risk of damage to the stand and site. It is essential that 
the risk of groundwater and watercourses pollution, and soil erosion, arising from mechanised 
harvesting operations are minimised; 
2.  Wheeled  machines  (viz.  those fitted with  tyres as  distinct  from band  tracks or  fully  tracked 
machines) are the most suitable for eco-efficient harvesting on sensitive sites; 
3.  Machines and tyres should be selected to suit the site and soil type (see specific site details, later); 
4.  Riparian buffer zones should be included in order to minimise the risk of run off into watercourses;  
5.  Machines should avoid travelling closer than 50 m to a watercourse without adequate protective 
measures in place. 
4.2 Site specific recommendations 
There is considerable variation in the types of sensitive sites throughout Europe. These range from wet 
peat soils in Ireland (where run off into local watercourses is a major concern) to steep dry escarpments 
in Mediterranean countries (where erosion is difficult to contain). Site slope is of particular importance 
in regard to run off and erosion risk, and the mechanisation system needs to be matched to the site, and 
the option of using cable extraction systems must be considered. Peat soils are common in Ireland, 
Britain and parts of Fennoscandia. There are two main categories of these soils: 
1.  Raised bogs and fen peats (typical GBC range: 30 – 80 kPa) which are common in the Irish 
midlands, Finland and parts of Scotland. These are generally on flat ground and the peat can be 
several metres deep. 
2.  Blanket peats (typical GBC range: 10 – 60 kPa) which occur in highland terrain in Ireland and 
Scotland. These are generally on sloping ground (or on flat areas of highland from which water 
drains to lower reaches) and have lower ground bearing capacity (GBC) than raised bogs. Peat 
depth can vary from 0.5 to 2 m with an impervious layer beneath the peat. These particular sites 
are very prone to rutting and severe soil structure breakdown (viz. slurrying). 
Similar principles would apply to wet clay soils which have low ground bearing capacities. 
In the case of soils at risk from erosion, particular attention must be paid to the avoidance of surface 
scuffing. The use of tracked vehicles is not recommended as the cleats can cause considerable soil 
scuffing. In addition, brash mat should be used in particularly difficult situations.  
4.3  Machinery Selection 
4.3.1   Site factors 
The incorrect choice of machine or perseverance with unsuitable existing machines may lead to severe 
ground  damage.  Harvesting  and  extraction  machines  should  also  be  compatible  with  respect  to 
environmental impact and productivity. 
Contractual timber harvesting is often based on compromise machines (i.e. may not be optimal for a 
specific  site) since they  carry out  harvesting work  on  different  types  of sites.   Contracts  for  the 
harvesting of sensitive sites should therefore stipulate preferred machine types, i.e. ensuring that only 
contractors with site-suitable machines are allowed on sensitive sites. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested