pdf library open source c# : How to save a filled out pdf form in reader application Library tool html asp.net azure online PervasiveDataParserforUnstructedTextOnlineHelp0-part1967

Pervasive Data Parser for Unstructured Text Online Help - Table of 
Contents 
Pervasive DataTools 
Data Parser for Unstructured Text User
s Guide 
Pervasive Software Inc. 
12365 Riata Trace Parkway 
Building B 
Austin, TX 78727 USA 
About This Manual 
This manual is currently a work in progress and therefore is incomplete. Documentation for the Data Parser for Unstructured Text is also available by 
clicking on the Help button on the right end of the button bar whenever the product is running. 
This manual leads you through the operation of the Data Parser for Unstructured Text user interface. The Pervasive Data Parser for Unstructured Text allows you to 
extract useful data from report files and convert that data to a CSV Text file. You must have a non-expired Data Parser for Unstructured Text license to run this 
application. 
Refer to the license.txt file in the default installation directory for disclaimers and information about trademarks and credits. 
Table of Contents 
Getting Started with Data Parser for Unstructured Text 
l
Introduction to Data Parser for Unstructured Text
l
Data Extraction Basics
l
Feature Segmentation
Tutorials 
l
About the Tutorials
l
Tutorial 1 
-
The Basics
l
Tutorial 2 
-
Tagged Data and Automatic Features
l
Tutorial 3 
-
Columnar Data
l
Tutorial 4 
-
Floating Tags
l
Tutorial 5 
-
Columnar Data with a Footer
l
Tutorial 6 
-
Variable Length Multi
-
Line Data Fields
l
Tutorial 7 
-
Multiple Accept Records
Using Data Parser for Unstructured Text 
l
Introduction to Basic Elements
l
Some Helpful Tips
l
Open a Text File or URI
l
Extract Tuning Tips
All About Line Styles 
l
Defining Line Styles
l
Recognition Rules
l
Suggested Approach 
-
Defining Line Styles
All About Data Fields 
l
Defining Data Fields
l
Data Fields 
-
Advanced Options
How to save a filled out pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
export pdf form data to excel; extract table data from pdf to excel
How to save a filled out pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf into excel; extract data from pdf using java
Viewing the Extracted Data 
l
Internal Data Browser
l
External Data Browser  
Exporting the Extracted Data 
l
Exporting the Data
Saving and Reusing Extract Scripts 
l
How to Save an Extract Script
l
How to ReUse a Saved Extract Script
Reference - User Interface 
l
Tool Bar Buttons
l
Extract Script Manager Window
l
Extract Script Designer
l
Source Options Window
l
Debug Extract Design Window  
l
ACCEPT Record Definition Window  
l
Accept Record Reorder  
l
Record Browser Window  
l
Multi-Record Browser  
l
Pattern Builder Window
l
Line Order for Extract Window  
l
All Fields Window  
l
Edit Fields Window  
l
Export Field Order Window  
l
Find Text  
l
Pop-up Menu - Line Style Column  
l
Pop-up Menu - Data Panel  
l
Line Style Definition Window  
l
Data Field Definition Window  
Appendix 
l
How to Create a Report File
l
URI Support
Introduction to Data Parser for Unstructured Text 
The Data Parser for Unstructured Text is a software product with the ability to read complex text files of many kinds. The amount of computer data grows vastly each 
year, and much of it is provided in raw text formats. Some examples of the many sources handled by the Data Parser for Unstructured Text follow: 
l
Printouts from programs captured as disk files  
l
Reports of any size or dimension  
l
ASCII or any type of EBCDIC text files  
l
Spooled print files  
l
Fixed length sequential files  
l
Complex multi-line files  
l
Downloaded text files (e.g., news retrieval, financial, real estate)  
l
HTML and other structured documents  
l
Internet text downloads  
l
Email header and body  
l
Online textual databases  
l
CD-ROM textbases  
l
Files with tagged data fields  
l
XML  
l
HL7  
l
Swift  
l
And many others...  
Using Data Parser for Unstructured Text, you can extract the desired data fields from various lines in the text file, and assemble those fields into a flat record of data. 
Thus, whole records of structured data can be extracted and presented in a conventional tabular (row and column) format that is needed before mapping and 
converting the data to a popular target format. Some of the features that make the Data Parser for Unstructured Text so complete are: 
l
No practical limits on file size  
l
Reads almost any kind of report architecture as long as there are rules  
l
Support for large fields and records  
l
Handles floating headers, footers and details  
l
Can automatically detect and propose recognition patterns  
l
Handles tagged data fields  
VB.NET Image: How to Draw and Cutomize Text Annotation on Image
can adopt these APIs to work out more advanced Fill.Solid_Color = Color.Gray 'set filled shapes color As Bitmap = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName &
export pdf data to excel; pdf form data extraction
VB.NET TIFF: Make Custom Annotations on TIFF Image File in VB.NET
This online guide content is Out Dated! with image, as well as delete and save annotation made set annotation edge color 'set the property of filled shape obj
pdf form field recognition; extract data from pdf file
l
l
Powerful debugging tools  
l
Structured data browser to see results prior to export  
l
Built on an extensible, extremely rich scripting language  
The extraction of desired fields from the source text file is accomplished by visually marking up the file in the Data Parser for Unstructured Text user interface. The 
mouse is employed to select the desired fields from various lines displayed on the screen. Dialog boxes on the screen allow you to express a rich set of pattern 
recognition rules and actions to assist in the extraction of clean data. 
Several techniques are available to view samples of extracted data. Apart from scrolling the full text of the data, a debug window can be used to search for all lines 
satisfying certain extraction criteria. For details, see **Debug Extract Design Window**. In addition, users can pop up a data browser that assembles all the fields and 
records in a grid format to give the user an idea of how the data will export. For details, see **Record Browser Window**. 
Data Extraction Basics 
The Data Extractor is a tool for extracting data that would otherwise be inaccessible. 
Consider these scenarios: 
l
Your company is attempting to migrate several years
’ 
worth of data from a legacy application. The data files for this application are stored in an unknown 
proprietary format, possibly with compressed or encrypted fields. Although the data cannot be accessed directly, your legacy application can generate reports.  
l
Your agency needs to merge data from several disparate sources into a single, easily accessible format. For example, you receive listings of real-estate 
properties from several different electronic sources that you want to combine into one standard listing format for your web site.  
l
One of your clients needs to extract specific data from many large log files and aggregate that data into a database for statistical analysis.  
In each of these scenarios, the Data Extractor can extract valuable data from standard formated text files with lots of irrelevant information, such as headers and 
comments. 
The Data Extractor exports the extracted data to CSV (Comma Separated Values) Text file format. If you want to convert the data to another format, or you want to 
manipulate the data further after you have extracted it, the Data Loaders can accomplish this. The Data Loaders support over 100 different file types, allowing you to 
convert your data to the vast majority of databases used throughout the world. 
To Use Data Extractor 
First you need to have a report file. Most applications on nearly every type of platform give you the option of creating and printing reports. Have the program print the 
report in a text only format, either ASCII or any standard EBCDIC code page. For more information, see How to Create a Report File. 
1. Start a new script in the Data Extractor and select the report file.  
2. Look at the report in the Data Extractor. Notice the overall pattern of the report when it repeats, the page layout, and the style used to organize information. 
Locate the data that you want to extract.  
3. Input the structural information. The Data Extractor needs patterns and structural rules to identify important data. 
a. Define line styles by marking which lines have important information and how they can be recognized.  
b. Define data fields by marking the data that you want collected, and where it can be found.  
c. Specify line actions. While you are defining line styles and data fields, select options that specify how you want the data to be assembled into records and 
fields. The default action is to collect the fields. You must find the end of the first record, or the beginning of the second, and change the action for that line 
to Accept Record. This stops the collection process for the first record and begins the collection process for the second, thus setting exactly which fields 
are included in the eventual output for that record. If you want to define more than one type of record in a single report file, you can do that by defining 
more than one Accept Record line style.  
d. Assign the fields to each record type, according to how you want the data to be exported.  
4. Browse your data. Once you have entered all the information Data Extractor needs to find your data, and specified how you want it structured, the Data 
Extractor automatically builds that structure internally. You can open the data browser and see it in a grid. If the fields or records are not structured the way you 
want them, go back and adjust the data field and/or line style definitions.  
5. Finally, save the script. By saving your script, you can use it again if you need to extract data from a report with the same style in the future.  
Additional details about each of these steps are described in this documentation. 
Feature Segmentation 
The following list presents some of the features available in the Data Extractor: 
l
EBCDIC code page translation  
l
Recognizes special characters and invisible characters  
l
Multiple record Accepts  
l
Mailing Label Template autoparse  
l
Validates scripts automatically  
l
View source data in external applications  
l
Grid lines on Data Panel  
l
Extract/Mine data from irregular text files  
l
Auto New Line Style menu option  
l
Auto New Data Field menu option  
Some additional automatic menu options: 
l
Parse Columnar Data  
VB.NET PDF: Use VB Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Pages for
This online guide content is Out Dated! obj.FontBrush.Solid_Color = Color.Blue 'set filled font color As Bitmap = obj.PDFTextDrawing() img.Save(folderName__1 &
extract data from pdf form to excel; java read pdf form fields
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
4. FilledRectangle. Click to draw a filled rectangle annotation. Click to save created redaction with customized name. 6. zoomIn. Click to zoom out current file.
using pdf forms to collect data; exporting pdf data to excel
l
l
Parse on Field Separator  
l
Parse Tagged Data  
l
Parse Standards Data  
l
Parse XML/HTML Data  
l
Parse HL7 Data  
l
Parse Swift Data  
l
Parse LDIF Data  
l
Parse EDI Data  
About the Tutorials 
Seven step-by-step tutorials are available to help you learn how to use the Data Extractor. We recommend that you complete the tutorials in the order in which they 
appear, as each tutorial builds upon the concepts covered in the previous tutorial. 
Common Tasks 
The Data Extractor tutorials all have several tasks in common. Those tasks are described here, and you may refer to them as needed. 
l
Select Correct Tutorial File and Set Basic Options  
l
Browse Data Records  
l
Rearrange Data Fields  
l
Save and Close Extract Design  
Select Correct Tutorial File and Set Basic Options 
Before starting each tutorial, you must select the matching tutorial file and set some basic options and file properties. 
Use the following Data Extractor tutorial files with the tutorials: 
l
Tutorial 1 - TUTOR1.REP  
l
Tutorial 2 - TUTOR1.REP  
l
Tutorial 3 - TUTOR3.REP  
l
Tutorial 4 - TUTOR4.REP  
l
Tutorial 5 - TUTOR5.REP  
l
Tutorial 6 - TUTOR6.REP  
l
Tutorial 7 - TUTOR7.TXT  
To select a tutorial file and set basic options do the following: 
1. In the Data Extractor, click New Extract.  
2. In the Select the Text File window, navigate to the desired tutorial file in your default installation directory (Common800).  
3. Click Open. The report opens in the Data Extractor Data Panel.  
4. Open the Source Options window.  
5. In the Source Options window, select options that match the type and format of your text/report file.  
6. Close the Source Options window.  
7. Select Preferences from the menu and make sure "Close Definition Dialogs on Add/Update" is enabled.  
Browse Data Records 
Browse the data when you want to determine how your design choices have affected the data. 
To browse the data records: 
1. Click Browse Data Record in the toolbar. If there is only one Accept record, a message window appears saying something similar to "Fields Assigned to Accept 
Record Category". If there are multiple Accept Records, you will be prompted to assign specific data fields to each Accept Record.  
2. Click OK. All of the Data Fields appear in the Data Browser window for you to preview your data in a tabular (row and column) format and to verify you have 
defined everything correctly. If you wish, you may rearrange the data fields.  
Rearrange Data Fields 
If the fields in the Data Browser window are not in the order you want them to appear in the export data file, change the export field order. 
To rearrange data fields: 
1. Select Field > Export Field Layout from the menu.  
2. Click and drag a field name to the desired position. A special symbol displays while you are dragging.  
3. Reopen the Data Browser window to view your export fields in the order they will appear in the export data file.  
4. Once you are satisfied with the appearance of the data, save and close your extract script design.  
Save and Close Extract Design 
After you have completed your Extractor script, save and close it for later use. 
To save your script and close Data Extractor: 
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add Rectangle Annotation to Images &
Add-on successfully stands itself out from other C# Color.Gray;//set filled shape color img = obj.CreateAnnotation(); img.Save(folderName + "RectangleAnnotation
sign pdf form reader; online form pdf output
Extractor display as "Extract: Extract1" in the title bar. Note: Notice that the extract file name defaults to your workspace; however, the extension has been 
changed to .cxl. This is consistent with standard naming for Data Extractor scripts. You can change the Extract File Name, but the extension must remain .cxl.  
2. Navigate to your default installation directory (Common 800) and name the extract script file (for example, Tutor1.cxl).  
3. Enter a description of the tutorial, if desired, and click OK.  
4. Click the Close Extract icon in the toolbar.  
5. Exit Data Extractor by selecting File > Exit.  
The Data Extractor Tutorials 
The following is a list and brief description of each of the Data Extractor tutorials. 
l
Tutorial 1 
-
The Basics
l
Tutorial 2 
-
Tagged Data and Automatic Features
l
Tutorial 3 
-
Columnar Data
l
Tutorial 4 
-
Floating Tags
l
Tutorial 5 
-
Columnar Data with a Footer
l
Tutorial 6 
-
Variable Length Multi
-
Line Data Fields
l
Tutorial 7 
-
Multiple Accept Records
Data Parser for Unstructured Text - Tutorial 1 - The Basics 
Tutorial 1 guides you through the basic steps to create and save a script file in Data Parser for Unstructured Text. Later tutorials are more detailed. 
This tutorial presents the fundamental concepts for using the Data Parser for Unstructured Text. It is recommended that you do this tutorial first. The example file is a 
tagged list, but the procedure is useful regardless of the type of report. The best way to use this tutorial is to print a hard copy so you can follow the sequential steps. 
Tutorial Goals 
In this tutorial, you will learn: 
l
The basic process of creating an extract script  
l
How to save the script design  
l
New terms located throughout the documentation  
Procedure 
This tutorial is divided into three sections that should be completed in the order shown. 
Define the Line Style - Accept Record 
After selecting the tutorial file and setting up basic options, the first step in defining many extract scripts is to determine the line of data that marks the end of a record. In 
this case, the line with the string "Category:" is the last line of the first record. 
After you identify the end of the record, define the line style for that line by marking the information that makes that line unique. In every record in this data file, the last 
line contains the string "Category:". 
1. Highlight the string "Category:" (including the colon following it).  
2. Right-click anywhere in the Data Panel, (the large white area of the screen) and select Define Line Style > New Line Style. The Line Style Definition window 
appears. Notice Data Parser has already formed line recognition rules based on the information you highlighted. It searches for all lines that contain the string 
"Category:" in columns 15 through 23.  
3. To indicate that Data Parser should accept the record at this point, ending one record and beginning the next, click the Line Action tab.  
4. Select ACCEPT Record.  
5. Click Add and proceed to Define the Line Style - Collect Fields. The line style name, Category, now appears in the Line Style Column (the yellow column on 
the left of your screen) to mark that line as matching the Category: Line Style pattern. A bold green arrow displays designating that this is the Accept Record line. 
Scroll down in the data panel and notice that each line that matches the pattern you defined was automatically marked with the "Category" Line Style.  
Define the Line Style - Collect Fields 
In the TUTOR1 file, the first line of text that contains pertinent data is the line with the report date "13-Jul-95" (10th line). The dashes (and their positions) in this line 
make it unique and are likely to remain consistent even if the date changes in later reports. 
1. Highlight the first dash.  
2. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Line Style > New Line Style. The Line Style Definition window appears. Notice that a pattern was created based 
on what you highlighted. Data Parser looks for any line that contains a dash in column 13.  
3. Type a more descriptive Line Style Name, such as "Report_Date".  
4. Click the Line Action tab and leave the option set to COLLECT Field Contents. The COLLECT Field Contents option causes any fields defined on this line to 
be included in the final output. COLLECT Field Contents is the action you want for the majority of the lines in this type of report.  
5. Click Add.  
6. Locate and highlight the string "Problem No:".  
7. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Line Style > New Line Style. The Line Style Definition window appears. Notice that Data Parser generated a 
Line Style recognition pattern based on the highlighted string "Problem No:". Data Parser also used the string "Problem_No:" to name the Line Style. You may 
rename the Line Style if you wish. Data Parser automatically selects COLLECT Field Contents as the line action. Since this is the option you want on most of the 
lines in this report, accept the default.  
8. Type a line style name.  
10. Repeat steps 6 through 9 for each of the remaining lines in the first record. Remember, the "Category" Line Style has already been defined, and it is the Accept 
Record line.  
11. Proceed to Define Data Fields.  
Define Data Fields 
After defining line styles for 14 lines of the first record, define the Data Fields. You have given Data Parser the pattern information it needs to identify the lines in the 
report, now define what part of each line you consider to be useful data. 
1. Locate the line containing the date of the report. The line shows only the report date, so all of the text on that line is important.  
2. Highlight the entire date. The highlighted text is 1 row by 9 columns. The column and row numbers show at the bottom right part of the screen. Columns 11 
through 19 on row 10 contain the date.  
3. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Data Field - New Data Field. The Field Definition window appears. Notice the Field Definition option is set to 
Fixed Column in both the Start Rule and End Rule tabs. The Data Field starts in column 11 and ends in column 19, exactly where you highlighted.  
4. The Field Name defaults to "Report_Date_1" indicating that this is the first field on the Report_Date line. Change the default name to a more descriptive name, 
Report_Date, by typing it in the Field Name box.  
5. Click Add.  
6. Define the remaining Data Fields: 
a. On the Problem_No line, highlight from column 25 to 30. This grabs enough space to include any larger numbers that might occur in later records.  
b. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Data Field > New Data Field.  
c. The default Field Name is Problem_No_1. Problem_No is a descriptive name, but there is only one field on this line so the "_1" is unnecessary.  
d. Click in the Field Name box and backspace twice to delete the number and underscore. Notice the Field Definition defaults to Fixed Column in both the 
Start Rule and End Rule tabs, starting in column 25 and ending in column 30.  
e. Click Add.  
7. Repeat step 6 for each remaining line of text on page 1 in TUTOR1.REP containing tagged data. See Table 3-2 below.  
8. Proceed to Browse Data Record in order to see how your data has changed.  
9. Rearrange Data Fields as needed.  
10. Save and Close your script.  
Table 3-2: Tutorial 1 - Data Field Start and End Rules 
Data Parser for Unstructured Text - Tutorial 2 - Tagged Data and 
Automatic Features 
Tutorial 2 guides you through the steps to create and save a script file using Data Parser
s automatic processes. The source file for this tutorial is the same tagged-list 
used in Data Parser for Unstructured Text Tutorial 1. 
This tutorial introduces some of the useful timesaving features of Data Parser that read and flatten a data file that contains tagged data. It is useful to anyone ready to 
learn about more advanced Data Parser features. Tutorial 2 examines some quicker, more automatic ways to parse the same tagged-data used in Data Parser Tutorial 
1. 
Things to remember when defining Data Fields and Line Styles in tagged data: 
l
When Data Parser automatically creates Data Fields, it uses the positions you have highlighted to determine the length of the Data Field. Be sure and allocate 
enough space for data in subsequent records that are wider than the text you are currently selecting. For example, the Techie Name in the first record is "John". 
In a subsequent record it could be "Alexander Graham Bell IV".  
l
For tagged data, everything in the selection to the left of the Tag Separator is the Field Tag and everything to the right of the Tag Separator is the Data Field.  
l
When a Line Style is created, it is not just for the line you are working on but also for any line that matches the Line Style definition. This means that when you 
create a Line Style that looks for "Techie:" in columns 17 to 24, and there is a Data Field defined for that Line Style in columns 26 to 55, all lines that have 
"Techie:" in columns 17 to 24 have a Data Field in columns 26 to 55.  
Tutorial Goals 
In this tutorial, you will learn: 
Data Field
Starting ColumnEnding Column
Report_Date
11
19
Problem_No
25
30
Techie
25
52
Status
25
52
MMDDYY
25
32
Time
25
32
Serial_No
25
39
Version
25
52
Customer_Name25
52
Company_Name25
52
Phone_No
25
52
Source_Type
25
52
Target_Type
25
52
Category
25
52
l
How to create an extract script using automatic processes  
l
How to save the extract design as a script file  
l
New terms used throughout the Data Parser documentation  
Procedure 
These steps should be completed in the order shown. 
Define Data Fields 
After selecting the tutorial file and setting up basic options, the first step in defining most extract scripts is to determine the line of data that marks the end of a record. In 
the TUTOR1 data file, the line of text that contains "Category:" marks the end of each record. 
1. Highlight the line that contains the string "Category:", up to column 45. Check the indicator in the lower right corner of the screen for column locations.  
2. Right-click anywhere in the Data Panel (the large white area of the screen) and select Define Data Field > Parse Tagged Data. Note: Data Parser automatically 
defines a Line Style with the string "Category:" in columns 15 through 23 as the recognition pattern, and a Line Action of Collect Fields, and names it "Category". 
It also creates a Data Field that collects any data on that line beginning at column 24, one space after the colon, and going to column 45, and names it 
"Category". The field is now defined, and the text turns red on the screen.  
3. If you wish to check the Data Field definition, you can double-click on the field itself (the red text) and the Field Definition window opens. Make any necessary 
changes, then click Update.  
4. Proceed to Define the Line Style - Accept Record.  
Define the Line Style - Accept Record 
Since the Category Line Style is the last line of the record, the Line Action should be Accept Record. When Data Parser creates a line style automatically, it makes the 
line style Collect Fields, so the line action needs to be changed. 
1. Double-click on the Line Style Name, "Category" in this case, in the Line Style Column, the yellow column on the left part of your screen. The Line Style 
Definition window appears.  
2. Click on the Line Action tab and select ACCEPT Record [Including] This Line
s Fields from the list of choices.  
3. Click Update.  
4. View the data record by clicking on the Browse Data Record button in the button bar.  
5. Proceed to Adjust Data Field Definition.  
Adjust Data Field Definition 
1. Select the entire Problem No line by left clicking on that line in the Line Style Column (the left yellow column).  
2. Right-click in the Data Panel (the large white part on the right) and select Define Data Field > Parse Tagged Data. The Line Style pattern that Data Parser 
automatically creates looks for Problem No: in positions 13 through 23.  
3. Double-click on Problem_No if you want to check it.  
4. Click Close to close the Line Style Definition window.  
5. To display the Field Definition window to view the information for the Problem_No: Data Field that was automatically generated, double-click anywhere in the 
Data Field where the text is red.  
6. Click the End Rule tab. Notice that the end rule is 52. This is larger than the Problem No: Data Field needs to be, because it is defining the size of the Data Field 
all the way to the right margin of the report.  
7. Change the end rule of the Problem_No: field to 30.  
8. Click Update. Notice the selected area on the Data panel for the Problem_No: Data Field is much smaller after the update.  
9. Proceed to Define the Header Information.  
Define the Header Information 
For this exercise, assume that the first line of the report contains information you want. 
1. Highlight the report name WINTECH on line 8 in positions 11 through 17.  
2. Right-click in the Data panel, and select Define Data Field > New Data Field. The Field Definition window appears.  
3. The default Data Field Name is highlighted. Since there is no tag on this line, Data Parser used the data itself as the Line Style name and Data Field name. 
Change the field name to ReportName by typing it in the Field Name box.  
4. Click Add.  
5. To define the report date Data Field, repeat steps 1 through 4, except highlight from columns 11 to 19 and name the field ReportDate.  
6. Proceeed to Update Line Style.  
Update Line Style 
The purpose of this exercise is to update the automatically generated "Jul95" Line Style to make it more generic for different report dates. 
1. To edit the "Jul95" Line Style, double-click on Jul95 in the Line Style Column. The Line Style Definition window diplays. Notice that the Pattern for this Line 
Style looks for 13-Jul-95 in columns 11 to 19.  
2. Size the cells in the grid to view the information better, by following these steps: 
a. Position the mouse over the line in the header row of the grid where the column headings are. The mouse pointer becomes a bold vertical bar with arrows 
pointing to the left and right.  
b. Hold down the mouse button and drag the edge of the column to the left or right.  
c. Release the mouse button when the column is the desired size.  
d. If desired, adjust the height the same way using the gray border to the left where the triangle and asterisk are located.  
3. To change the pattern to look for a line with any date with the dd-mmm-yy format, click once in the Look For? cell on the first row of the grid where 13-Jul-95 
is currently displayed. A down arrow appears on the right side of that cell.  
5. TAB to the Value cell, delete the original value, and type a dash (-).  
6. Change the values of both the Begin and End cells to 13 by tabbing to them and typing in the correct number.  
7. Click OK. Notice that the Look For?, Begin, and End values have changed in the Line Style Definition window to reflect the changes made in the Pattern 
Builder window.  
8. Add a new row to the Line Style Definition grid by clicking in the And/Or cell in the second row. Accept the value default of And.  
9. Click in the Search What? cell of the second row and click the down arrow.  
10. Select Column Range (m-n) from the displayed list.  
11. Select Contains from the list displayed in the Operator cell of the second row.  
12. Click on the arrow in the Look For? cell of the second row to display the Pattern Builder window again.  
13. to the Value cell, delete the original value, and type in a dash (-).  
14. Change the Begin and End values to 17. Be careful to only enter a dash in the Value cell and do not leave any spaces around it.  
15. Click OK. The line style definition should now match any line with a dash in position 13 and 17.  
16. Click Update to save the changes to the ReportDate Line Style.  
17. Proceed to Define Remaining Data Fields and Line Styles.  
Define Remaining Data Fields and Line Styles 
In this exercise, you will Define Data Fields and Line Styles for the Techie, Status, MM/DD/YY, Time, Ser #, Version, Customer Name, Company Name, Phone #, 
Source Type, and Target Type Tagged Data Fields. 
1. Highlight the Field Tag, the Tag Separator, and the data by dragging the mouse with the left mouse button depressed from the beginning of the Tag to the end of 
the Data Field. Remember to extend out to the right to catch wider data in subsequent records.  
2. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Data Field > Parse Tagged Data. Data Parser creates a Line Style Definition and a Data Field Definition for you. 
OR  
3. Click the line in the Line Style column to select it.  
4. Select Parse Tagged Data.  
5. Open the Field Definition window.  
6. Adjust settings.  
7. Click Update and Close. 
Note:Data Parser named the MM/DD/YY, Ser #, and Phone # Data Fields and corresponding Line Styles MMDDYY, Ser, and Phone. Also, Data Fields with 
embedded spaces are named with the spaces removed. This was done because Field Names can only contain letters, digits and underscores. Scroll down in the 
Data panel and see how the rest of the data is being defined. 
8. Browse the data records to see how your data has changed.  
9. If desired, rearrange the data fields as needed to meet your export file requirements.  
10. Save and close your script.  
Tip: This file can be parsed even more automatically. If you wish to try it, follow these steps: 
1. Click the Clear Line Styles icon in the button bar.  
2. Highlight all the tagged data lines in the entire first record, beginning with the Problem No line and highlighting all the way down and including the Category line. 
Be sure to catch all the field tags and data plus some extra space to the right.  
3. Right-click in the data panel and select Define Data Field > Parse Tagged Data. The Data Parser creates several new line styles and data fields at once. This 
method only works in cases of highly structured and consistent data. And it can be a great time saver when conditions are ideal.  
Data Parser for Unstructured Text - Tutorial 3 - Columnar Data 
Tutorial 3 guides you through the steps to create and save a script file in Data Parser for Unstructured Text that reads and flattens a report containing columnar data. 
In Tutorial 3, you convert the data in a columnar report file, to a flattened format, using the more automatic features of Data Parser. 
This tutorial introduces more of the time-saving features of Extract Schema Designer. Since a great many report formats contain columnar data of some kind, it is highly 
useful to anyone who wants to use Data Parser. 
By following the steps outlined below, you become familiar with both the process of creating an extract script and the terms used throughout the documentation. 
Unlike the previous tutorials, this file has multiple Accept Record line styles in a single page of the report. The primary data record information is in the table detail lines. 
Each line is essentially a record. Each of these is an Accept Record line. 
Tutorial Goals 
In this tutorial, you will learn: 
l
How to create a script that reads and flattens a report with columnar data  
l
How to use more automatic features of Data Parser  
l
How to save the script file  
Procedure 
The following steps should be completed in the order shown: 
Define Line Styles and Data Fields for Detail Lines 
l
Divides the line into seven Data Fields using spaces as a column separator. The Data Fields are given default field names SALES/ MARKETING_1 through 
SALES/MARKETING_7.  
l
Creates a Line Style for the line. The Line Style that is automatically created has a default Line Name of SALESMARKETING. It identifies all lines in the report 
that have the string SALES/MARKETING in positions 1 through 16.  
To define the line styles and data fields for detail lines: 
1. Select the first detail line (it begins with SALES/MARKETING) by clicking in the Line Style column (the narrow yellow stripe on the left) immediately to the left 
of the line. This highlights the entire line of text.  
2. Right-click in the Line Style Column (the yellow part of the screen on the left) and select Parse Columnar Data.  
3. From the menu, select Preferences and click once on Close Definition Dialogs on Add/Update to disable the option.  
4. To view the definitions of the Data Fields created, double-click on the colored sections of the line. For example, double-clicking on the green numbers 75,249 in 
the Data Panel brings up the SALES/MARKETING_2 Data Field in the Field Definition window. SALES/MARKETING_2 is the default Data Field name 
given to the second Data Field in the SALESMARKETING line. It starts in position 20 and ends in position 27. Since it is defined for the Line Style 
SALESMARKETING, only lines that match that recognition pattern contain this Data Field in positions 20 through 27.  
5. Proceed to Change Data Field Names.  
Change Data Field Names  
The Browse Data Record uses the Data Field names as column headings for the Data Fields, so it is a good idea to change the Data Field names for 
SALES/MARKETING_1 through SALES/MARKETING_7 to more descriptive field names. 
To change Data Field names: 
1. Double-click on one of the Data Fields in the SALESMARKETING line to open the Field Definition window.  
2. In the Field Definition window, highlight the default Field Name and replace it with a corresponding descriptive name. See table 3-3 below.  
3. Click Update.  
4. To select the next Data Field, click the Field Name arrow to display a drop-down list of Data Fields that have been defined for the current Line Style.  
5. Select the next Data Field and continue until you have renamed all the fields. Close the Field Definition window when finished.  
6. Proceed to Change Line Style Name and Definition.  
Table 3-3: Tutorial 3 - Suggested Data Field Names 
Change Line Style Name and Definition 
To view the new Line Style SALESMARKETING, double-click on the name SALESMARKETING in the Line Style column (the yellow column on the left of your 
screen). The Line Style Definition window appears. 
Notice the SALESMARKETING Line Style is recognized by a pattern where columns 1 to 16 contain the string SALES/MARKETING. 
To change the Line Style Name and Line Action: 
1. In the Line Style Definition window, change the Line Style Name by highlighting SALESMARKETING in the Line Style Name box and replacing it with Detail.  
2. Also in the Line Style Definition window, click the Line Action tab and select the ACCEPT Record Including option.  
3. Click Update.  
4. Proceed to Define Line Recognition Rules.  
Define Line Recognition Rules 
The Detail Line Style only matches lines that have SALES/MARKETING in columns 2 through 16. That is the recognition pattern that Data Parser created 
automatically, but it is not the pattern that is needed in this case. The pattern needs to be general enough to match all of the detail lines in the text, but specific enough to 
match ONLY the detail lines. Update the Line Pattern so that the Line Style match all of the detail lines excluding the TEAM TOTALS line. 
Analyze the detail lines to find what makes them unique in comparison to other lines in the text. Things to look for are position of the Data Fields, contents of the Data 
Fields, anything that is consistent for each of the detail lines but not contained in non-detail lines. For example, the detail lines contain: 
l
Commas in positions 24, 34 and 75 on every line  
l
Only letters, white space, and a "/" in columns 2 through 18  
l
Only digits, white space, and commas in columns 20 through 79  
l
A digit in position 78  
l
An upper case letter in each of the first 5 positions  
Of all of the above observations, creating a pattern to look for uppercase letters in the first five positions is the best way to go. Here are some reasons why: 
Default Name
Suggested Name
SALES/MARKETING_1Department
SALES/MARKETING_2Team1
SALES/MARKETING_3Team2
SALES/MARKETING_4Team3
SALES/MARKETING_5Team4
SALES/MARKETING_6Team5
SALES/MARKETING_7DepartmentTotal
l
subsequent reports. Suppose in this same report (created a week later) Team 2 of the Development department went to a pre-paid weeklong class and they 
only spent 100 dollars on supplies for the class. This means that a comma would not be in position 34 of that detail line so it would not match the Line Style, and 
the essential data on that line would be lost.  
l
Defining a pattern to check for letters, white space, and a "/" in columns 2 through 18 would require three pattern lines and would also match the column heading 
line.  
l
Defining a pattern to match lines that contains at least one digit in positions 20 through 79 and do not contain letters or "/" would require three pattern lines and it 
would match the detail lines. However, it also matches the Team Totals line.  
l
Defining a pattern to match lines that contain a digit in position 79 would match the detail lines and the Team Totals line.  
To define a pattern that looks for upper case letters in positions 2 through 6: 
1. Click the Line Recognition Rules tab in the Line Style Definition window.  
2. Click once in the Look For? cell in the first row of the grid and click the down arrow. The Pattern Builder window appears.  
3. In the Pattern Builder window, click in the Type cell and click the down arrow to display the allowable values for the Type field.  
4. Select character class from the list. This tells Extract Schema Designer what kind of data it needs to match for that line style to be valid.  
5. Tab to the Value cell and click the arrow to display the allowable values for the Value field.  
6. Select upper case letters from the list. This tells Data Parser the specific data it needs to match for that line style to be valid.  
7. Change the value in the Count cell to 5 by highlighting the value there and typing a 5.  
8. Change the value of the Begin field to 2 and the End field to 6. This tells Data Parser where to look for the data you specified and how many of that particular 
data must be found for the line style to match that line.  
9. Click OK.  
10. Click Update to save the modified line style definition.  
11. Proceed to Define Data Fields.  
Define Data Fields 
In this part of the exercise, you will define the rest of the data in the record, starting with the report title. 
To define the ReportTitle Data Field: 
1. Select the report title ABC CORPORATION BUDGET on line 1 by highlighting it in the Data Panel.  
2. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Data Field > New Data Field. The Field Definition window appears.  
3. Change the default name to ReportTitle.  
4. Click Add. Data Parser takes the selected text and Data Field name to automatically define a Data Field named ReportTitle and a line style as well, named 
ABC_CORPORATION_BUDG.  
5. Click Close.  
6. Double-click on ABC_CORPORATION_BUDG in the Line Style Column to display the Line Style Definition window. Notice that Data Parser automatically 
creates a recognition pattern that looks for the literal ABC CORPORATION BUDGET in positions 27 through 48.  
7. In the LineStyleName field, type ReportTitle.  
8. Click Update and Close.  
9. Proceed to Define Line Styles.  
Define Line Styles 
1. Select the report date 10/26/95 on line 2 by highlighting the text with the mouse.  
2. Right-click in the Data Panel and select Define Data Field > New Data Field. The Field Definition window appears.  
3. Change the default name to ReportDate.  
4. Click Add and then Close. Data Parser takes the selected text and enters Data Field name and automatically define a Data Field and a Line Style.  
5. Double-click Style1 in the Line Style Column to display the Line Style Definition window. Notice that Data Parser automatically created a recognition pattern 
that looks for the literal "/" in positions 35 and 38.  
6. Rename the Line Style to ReportDate.  
7. Click Update and Close.  
8. Browse the data Records to see how your data has changed.  
9. If desired, rearrange the data fields as needed to meet your export file layout requirements.  
10. Save and close your script.  
Data Parser for Unstructured Text - Tutorial 4 - Floating Tags 
Tutorial 4 guides you through the steps to create and save a script in Data Parser for Unstructured Text that reads and flattens a data file that containing floating tag data 
in a variable-length ASCII report. 
This tutorial is useful to anyone likely to be working with floating tag data. By following the steps outlined below, you become familiar with both the process of creating 
an extract script and the terms used throughout the documentation. 
Tutorial Goals 
In this tutorial, you will learn: 
l
How to create a script that reads and flattens an ASCII report with floating tag data  
l
How to save the script file  
l
New terms located throughout the documentation  
Procedure 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested