pdf library open source c# : Edit pdf form in reader Library application class asp.net azure wpf ajax pg2_addingandsubtractingnumberto1000-part1973

Mathematics 
Planning Guide 
Grade 2 
Adding and Subtracting Number to 100 
Number 
Specific Outcomes 8, 9 
This Planning Guide can be accessed online at: 
http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/mepg2/html/pg2_addingandsubtractingnumberto100/index.html 
Edit pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
html form output to pdf; extract data from pdf file
Edit pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
save pdf forms in reader; extracting data from pdf forms
Table of Contents 
Curriculum Focus .........................................................................................................  2 
What Is a Planning Guide? ..........................................................................................  3 
Planning Steps ..............................................................................................................  3 
Step 1: Identify Outcomes to Address .........................................................................  4 
Big Ideas ................................................................................................................  4 
Sequence of Outcomes from the Program of Studies ............................................  6 
Step 2: Determine Evidence of Student Learning ........................................................  7 
Using Achievement Indicators ...............................................................................  7 
Step 3: Plan for Instruction ..........................................................................................  9 
A. Assessing Prior Knowledge and Skills ............................................................  9 
 Sample Structured Interview: Assessing Prior Knowledge and Skills ............  11 
B.  Choosing Instructional Strategies ....................................................................  13 
C.  Choosing Learning Activities ..........................................................................  14 
 Sample Activity 1: Zero, the Identity Element for Addition and Subtraction .  15 
 Sample Activity 2: The Commutative Property of Addition ...........................  16 
 Sample Activity 3: Associative Property of Addition .....................................  18 
 Sample Activity 4: Baby Steps to Personal Strategies .....................................  20 
 Sample Activity 5: Personal Strategies You Might Encounter ........................  22 
 Sample Activity 6: Recognizing the Parts and the Whole in Addition 
and Subtraction Problems .................................................  26 
 Sample Activity 7: The Influence of Manipulatives ........................................  28 
 Sample Activity 8: The Traditional Algorithms ..............................................  29 
 Sample Activity 9: Sample Problems for Developing 
Personal Strategies ............................................................  31 
Step 4: Assess Student Learning ..................................................................................  33 
A. Whole Class/Group Assessment ......................................................................  33 
B.  One-on-one Assessment ...................................................................................  42 
C.  Applied Learning .............................................................................................  46 
Step 5: Follow-up on Assessment ................................................................................  47 
A. Addressing Gaps in Learning ...........................................................................  47 
B.  Reinforcing and Extending Learning ...............................................................  48 
Bibliography ................................................................................................................  51 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 1 of 51 
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
Recognize PDF-417 2D barcode in .NET WinForms & ASP.NET in .NET WinForms project & ASP.NET web form with C# Mature .NET Code 128 image reader & scanner for C#
how to type into a pdf form in reader; c# read pdf form fields
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to
exporting data from excel to pdf form; export excel to pdf form
Planning Guide: Grade 2  
Adding and Subtracting Number to 100 
Strand:
Number 
Specific Outcomes:
8, 9 
This 
Planning Guide
addresses the following outcomes from the Program of Studies: 
Strand:
Number 
Specific Outcomes: 
8.  Demonstrate and explain the effect of adding zero to, 
or subtracting zero from, any number. 
9.  Demonstrate an understanding of addition (limited to 
1- and 2-digit numerals) with answers to 100 and the 
corresponding subtraction by: 
using personal strategies for adding and subtracting 
with and without the support of manipulatives 
creating and solving problems that involve addition 
and subtraction 
using the commutative property of addition (the 
order in which numbers are added does not affect 
the sum) 
using the associative property of addition (grouping 
a set of numbers in different ways does not affect 
the sum) 
explaining that the order in which numbers are 
subtracted may affect the difference. 
Curriculum Focus 
This sample targets the following changes to the curriculum: 
The specific outcome in 2007 focuses on demonstrating an understanding of addition and the 
corresponding subtraction for numbers to 100, using personal strategies with or without 
manipulatives. The previous mathematics curriculum specified using manipulatives, 
diagrams and symbols to demonstrate and describe the processes of addition and subtraction. 
The current reference to "corresponding subtraction" indicates the importance of students' 
awareness of subtraction as the inverse of addition and the option students have of solving 
subtraction by thinking addition.  
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 2 of 51 
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Bookmark. C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Bookmark and Outline in C#.NET. Empower Your C#
how to fill in a pdf form in reader; extract pdf form data to xml
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically.
how to extract data from pdf to excel; extracting data from pdf to excel
It is of note that the 1997 curriculum included a specific outcome that stated students should 
"apply and explain multiple strategies to determine sums and differences on 2-digit numbers, 
with and without regrouping." This has only changed in the wording "personal strategies," 
rather than "multiple strategies"; the detailed description of some strategies such as those in 
specific outcome 6 of Grade 3 gives teachers a clear indication of the kinds of personal 
strategies that they might expect and structure lessons to encourage. 
The specific outcome in 2007 includes the commutative property of addition and the 
associative property of addition. The previous mathematics curriculum did not specify these 
properties at this level. Grade 2 students should recognize that the commutative property 
does not hold for subtraction.   
The 2007 curriculum specifies the students be able to "demonstrate and explain the effect of 
adding zero to, or subtracting zero from, any number." Zero is the identity element for 
addition and subtraction. This was not specified in the 1997 curriculum, although it is an 
expectation of students.  
The previous curriculum specified that students should have recall of addition and 
subtraction facts to 10 in Grade 2. There is no mention of an expected time of proficiency 
with facts to 18 in terms of accuracy and speed. The limitation of addition and subtraction 
facts being addressed each year (to 10 in Grade 1 and to 18 in Grade 2, with an emphasis on 
mental mathematics strategies to calculate these), will insure most students either commit 
them to memory through usage or have efficient ways to calculate them whenever needed. 
The old curriculum heavily emphasized the importance of learning operations in the context 
of problem solving. Although this is still a component of the new curriculum, it also includes 
the importance of creating problems to solve. 
What Is a Planning Guide? 
Planning Guides
are a tool for teachers to use in designing instruction and assessment that 
focuses on developing and deepening students' understanding of mathematical concepts. This 
tool is based on the process outlined in 
Understanding by Design
by Grant Wiggins and 
Jay McTighe. 
Planning Steps 
The following steps will help you through the Planning Guide: 
Step 1: Identify Outcomes to Address
(p. 4) 
Step 2: Determine Evidence of Student Learning
(p. 7) 
Step 3: Plan for Instruction
(p. 9) 
Step 4: Assess Student Learning
(p. 33) 
Step 5: Follow-up on Assessment
(p. 47) 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 3 of 51 
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Metadata. C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers
extract data from pdf; extract data from pdf to excel online
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for View, encode, decode, edit, process 100+ images.
extract pdf data into excel; how to save a filled out pdf form in reader
Step 1: Identify Outcomes to Address 
Guiding Questions 
What do I want my students to learn? 
What can my students currently understand and do? 
What do I want my students to understand and be able to do based on the Big Ideas and 
specific outcomes in the program of studies? 
Big Ideas
Addition and subtraction are related, with subtraction being the inverse of addition. 
The order of the numbers does not matter when you add, but does when you subtract. 
Traditional algorithms are often not the most efficient methods of computing. They are also 
not naturally invented by students. If the traditional algorithms are not taught to students 
early on, students will invent or adopt personal strategies that vary with the numbers and the 
situation. What is important is that the methods used are understood by the user.  
Personal strategies depend on taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways and 
recognizing relationships between numbers. 
Models, be they manipulatives or diagrams, can help a person recognize the operation 
involved and make sense of a problem. 
Examining any problems for the parts and the whole helps students make sense of the 
problem and identify the operation required. (See 
Categories of Addition and Subtraction 
Problems Based on Structure
, p. 50.) 
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics
states that computational fluency is a balance 
between conceptual understanding and computational proficiency (NCTM 2000, p. 35). 
Conceptual understanding requires flexibility in thinking about the structure of numbers (base-
ten system), the relationship among numbers and the connections between addition and 
subtraction. The ability to generate equivalent representations of the same number provides a 
foundation for using personal strategies to add and subtract, recognizing that for some problems 
either operation may be used. Computational proficiency includes both efficiency and accuracy. 
Personal strategies must be compared and evaluated so students adopt methods that are efficient, 
as well as accurate. 
Addition and subtraction problems include four main types: 
join problems involving an initial amount, a change amount (the amount being added or 
joined) and the resulting amount 
separate problems also involve change as in join problems, but the whole is the result in the 
join problems, whereas the whole is the initial amount in the separate problems 
part–part–whole problems consider two static quantities either separately or combined 
comparison problems determine how much two numbers differ in size. 
Adapted from John A. Van de Walle, LouAnn H. Lovin, 
Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics: Grades K–3
, 1e 
(pp. 66, 67, 68, 69). Published by Allyn and Bacon, Boston, MA. Copyright © 2006 by Pearson Education. 
Reprinted by permission of the publisher. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 4 of 51 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
perform quick file navigation. You may easily generate thumbnail image from PDF. C#.NET: PDF Form Field Edit. Please refer to this
pdf data extraction tool; extracting data from pdf forms to excel
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for View, encode, decode, edit, process 100+ images.
extract data from pdf to excel; java read pdf form fields
What is crucial is that students are familiar with the relationship between addition and 
subtraction and all the possible forms these operations take in problems. 
By using a variety of problems, students will construct their own meaning for the inverse 
relationship between addition and subtraction and for the following properties: 
commutative property of addition (numbers can be added in any order), which does not 
function for subtraction 
associative property of addition (grouping a set of numbers in different ways does not affect 
the sum) and 
the identity element for addition and subtraction, that is adding zero to or subtracting zero 
from a number will result in the original or start number. 
Students in Grade 2 generally do not know the names of these properties, but certainly learn to 
recognize and describe them. Grade 2 teachers who have students using the traditional algorithm 
will note that too many times their students subtract upside down or backwards, as if the 
commutative property of addition could be equally applied to subtraction. For example, if the 
equation to be solved is: 
53 
or  
53 – 29 = 
–29
students, upon noting that one cannot subtract 9 from 3, without even being aware they are 
inverting the numbers, may subtract 3 from 9. This creates a difference that is untrue for the 
equation given. This situation does not occur when students use invented personal strategies. 
When using the traditional algorithm, the manipulatives will prevent students from making this 
type of error. Some students will need to be made aware that they unconsciously do this when 
solving problems without manipulatives, so they can guard against this error.  
The use of manipulatives or models helps students understand the structure of the story problem 
and also connects the meaning of the problem to the number sentence (Van de Walle 2001, 
p. 108). To develop their understanding of the meaning of operations, students connect the story 
problem to the manipulatives, connect it to the number sentence and then use personal strategies 
to solve the problem.  
Reflect upon the student who adds   28 
+ 47
615 
and prints this incorrect answer: 615 (as all too frequently happens with the traditional 
algorithm). Errors of this magnitude do not happen when students use personal strategies. 
Seldom will students use a personal strategy they do not understand. The number sense that 
students are developing in Grade 2 is critical to their ability to progress to estimating the answer, 
necessary in Grade 3. Students' understanding of addition and subtraction is enhanced as they 
develop their own methods and share them with one another, explaining why their strategies 
work and are efficient (NCTM 2000, p. 220). 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 5 of 51 
Sequence of Outcomes from the Program of Studies 
See http://education.alberta.ca/teachers/core/math/programs.aspx
for the complete program of 
studies. 
¨
¨
Grade 1 
Grade 2 
Grade 3 
Specific Outcomes 
8. Identify the number, 
up to 20, that is: 
one more 
two more 
one less 
two less  
than a given number. 
9. Demonstrate an 
understanding of 
addition of numbers 
with answers to 20 and 
their corresponding 
subtraction facts, 
concretely, pictorially 
and symbolically, by:  
using familiar 
mathematical 
language to 
describe additive 
and subtractive 
actions 
creating and solving 
problems in context 
that involve 
addition and 
subtraction 
modelling addition 
and subtraction, 
using a variety of 
concrete and visual 
representations, and 
recording the 
process 
symbolically. 
Specific Outcomes 
Specific Outcomes 
8. Demonstrate and explain 
6. Describe and apply mental 
mathematics strategies for 
adding two 2-digit numerals, 
such as: 
the effect of adding zero 
to, or subtracting zero 
from, any number. 
9. Demonstrate an 
adding from left to right 
understanding of addition 
taking one addend to the 
nearest multiple of ten and 
then compensating 
(limited to 1- and 2-digit 
numerals) with answers to 
100 and the corresponding 
using doubles. 
subtraction by: 
7. Describe and apply mental 
mathematics strategies for 
subtracting two 2-digit 
numerals, such as: 
using personal 
strategies for adding 
and subtracting with 
and without the support 
taking the subtrahend to 
the nearest multiple of ten 
and then compensating 
of manipulatives 
creating and solving 
problems that involve 
thinking of addition 
addition and subtraction
using doubles. 
using the commutative 
9. Demonstrate an 
understanding of addition and 
subtraction of numbers with 
answers to 1000 (limited to 
1-, 2- and 3-digit numerals), 
concretely, pictorially and 
symbolically, by: 
property of addition 
(the order in which 
numbers are added does 
not affect the sum) 
using the associative 
property of addition 
(grouping a set of 
using personal strategies 
for adding and subtracting 
with and without the 
support of manipulatives 
numbers in different 
ways does not affect the 
sum) 
explaining that the 
creating and solving 
problems in context that 
involve addition and 
subtraction of numbers. 
order in which numbers 
are subtracted may 
affect the difference. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 6 of 51 
Step 2: Determine Evidence of Student Learning 
Guiding Questions 
What evidence will I look for to know that learning has occurred? 
What should students demonstrate to show their understanding of the mathematical concepts, 
skills and Big Ideas? 
Using Achievement Indicators 
As you begin planning lessons and learning activities, keep in mind ongoing ways to monitor and 
assess student learning. One starting point for this planning is to consider the achievement 
indicators listed in the 
Mathematics Kindergarten to Grade 9 Program of Studies with 
Achievement Indicators
. You may also generate your own indicators and use them to guide your 
observation of the students. 
The following indicators may be used to determine whether or not students have met specific 
outcomes 8 and 9. Can students: 
add zero to a given number, and explain why the sum is the same as the given number? 
subtract zero from a given number, and explain why the difference is the same as the given 
number? 
model addition and subtraction, using concrete or visual representations, and record the 
process symbolically? 
create a problem involving addition or subtraction given a number sentence? 
create an addition and subtraction number sentence and corresponding story problem for a 
given solution? 
solve a given problem involving a missing addend, and describe the strategy used? 
solve a given problem involving a missing minuend or subtrahend, and describe the strategy 
used? 
refine personal strategies to increase their efficiency? 
match a number sentence to a given missing addend problem? 
match a number sentence to a given missing subtrahend or minuend problem? 
explain or demonstrate the commutative property for addition: the order of addition does not 
affect the sum; e.g., 5 + 6 = 6 + 5? 
add a given set of numbers, using the associative property of addition (grouping a set of 
numbers in different ways does not affect the sum), and explain why the sum is the same; 
e.g., 2 + 5 + 3 + 8 = (2 + 3) + 5 + 8 or 5 + 3 + (8 + 2)? 
solve a given addition or subtraction computation in either horizontal or vertical formats? 
identify what each number in the problem means in relation to a part or a whole? 
recognize that some strategies are more efficient than others in particular cases? 
recognize that subtraction is not commutative, and so do not subtract upside down or 
backwards? 
explain how a strategy for adding and subtracting works and apply it to another similar 
problem (limited to 1- and 2-digit numerals)? 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 7 of 51 
create a different personal strategy for adding and subtracting and decide which strategy is 
more efficient when solving problems? 
analyze a personal strategy created by another person and decide if it makes sense in solving 
an addition or a subtraction problem? 
solve problems that involve addition and/or subtraction of more than two numbers with a 
sum or subtrahend of no more than 100? 
Sample behaviours to look for related to these indicators are suggested for some of the activities 
listed in 
Step 3,
Section
C: Choosing Learning Activities
(p. 14). 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 8 of 51 
Step 3: Plan for Instruction 
Guiding Questions 
What learning opportunities and experiences should I provide to promote learning of the 
outcomes and to permit the students to demonstrate their learning? 
What teaching strategies and resources should I use? 
How will I meet the diverse learning needs of my students?  
A. Assessing Prior Knowledge and Skills
Before introducing new material, consider ways to assess and build on students' knowledge and 
skills related to counting. For example:  
Can the student read number sentences such as 4 + 5 = 
, 7 – 5 = 
or variations such as 
4 + 
= 9, 
+ 5 = 9, 
– 5 = 2, 7 – 
= 2? (Does the student use the terms: "plus," 
"minus," "add," "subtract", "equal" and, when appropriate, a term for the variable, such as 
"something", "blank," "box," or "what/some number"?) 
Can the student demonstrate the meaning of such number sentences to sums of 20 or with 
minuends no larger than 20, by dramatizing a problem with manipulatives, with pictures or 
with diagrams? If not, can the student do so to answers of 10? Clarify whether the problem is 
with the size of the numbers, the concepts of addition and subtraction or the vocabulary. If 
the student is not yet able to demonstrate competence with addition and subtraction facts to 
ten, check for rote counting and one-to-one correspondence to 10 and then 20. 
Model the addition of 12 and 4 using concrete or visual representations and record the 
process symbolically. Can the student create addition models (to sums of 20) and write the 
corresponding symbolic representations? 
Model the subtraction of 8 from 13 using concrete or visual representations and record the 
process symbolically. Can the student create subtraction models and record the process 
symbolically (using numbers no larger than 20 for the minuend)? 
Can the student create an addition or subtraction story problem for various number sentences 
such as: 13 – 8 = 
or 8 + 
= 13? 
How accurately and how rapidly does the student solve these problems?   
Can the student verbalize the strategy used?   
If a student appears to have difficulty with these tasks, consider further individual assessment, 
such as a structured interview (see sample), to determine the student's level of skill and 
understanding. The Kathy Richardson books listed in the bibliography contain excellent 
structured interviews for investigating concept development. They also indicate how a teacher 
can address the development of missing concepts. See 
Sample Structured Interview: Assessing 
Prior Knowledge and Skills 
(p. 11). 
If the student is very proficient in producing correct answers quickly and can verbalize the 
strategies being employed, you may need to consider additional challenges for this student while 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 9 of 51 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested