pdf library open source c# : Extract data from pdf form fields software application cloud windows winforms asp.net class pg2_addingandsubtractingnumberto1004-part1977

Name : ________________________ 
Date: _______________________ 
Whole Class/Group Assessment – Grade 2: Number Sense 
Addition and Subtraction – Part C
You may use manipulatives, if you wish, on any of the following questions. 
1.  Draw a line between the problem below and the number sentence that belongs to it. 
a.  Yari had some hockey cards. His friend gave him    
62 + 27 =  
27 more. Now Yari has 62. How many did Yari have to start? 
b.  Juanita had 27 sea shells. Her friend had 62 sea shells in her  
62 – 27 =   
collection. How many more sea shells does her friend have than  
Juanita? 
c.  Terry had made a space ship with 27 pieces and another with             + 27 = 62 
62 pieces. How many pieces did the two ships use? 
d.  Sharon had 62¢ when she went to the dollar store. She had 27¢ 
62 –       = 27 
after her purchase there. How much did she spend at the dollar store?  
2.  Circle the numbers that are parts in the above equations. Put an X through the numbers that 
represent the whole in the above equations. 
3.  Add or subtract the following. 
a.  41 + 37 =  
b.  85 – 52 =  
c.  65 – 26 = 
d.  19 +      = 70 
e.  36 + 45 =  
f.  83 –      =  48 
g.     43 
h.  73 
i.  27 
j.  92 
k.  38 
+ 32
– 36
19 
–58
+ 26
33 
+ 21
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 40 of 51 
Extract data from pdf form fields - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract data out of pdf file; extract data from pdf table
Extract data from pdf form fields - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf c#; how to save editable pdf form in reader
Rubric for Whole Class Assessment Part C – 
Addition and Subtraction – Matching Problems and Equations,  
Recognizing Parts and the Whole, Computation Accuracy and Strategies 
Concept/Skill  
Not Yet 
Needs More 
Instruction/Practice 
Achieved 
Matching an 
addition or 
subtraction problem 
with its equation in 
Question 1. 
Matches one or 
none accurately. 
Matches two 
accurately. 
Matches three or all 
accurately. 
Recognizing parts 
and the whole in 
Question 2. 
Correctly 
identifies the 
parts in four or 
less of the eight 
possibilities. 
Correctly 
identifies the parts 
in five or six of 
the eight 
possibilities. 
Correctly marks all 
the numerals and 
variables as parts or at 
least made no other 
errors than not 
indicating the role of 
each variable. 
Correctly 
identifies the 
whole in two or 
less of the four 
equations. 
Identifies the 
whole in three of 
the four equations. 
Errors are more 
often of omission, 
rather than citing a 
number or 
variable 
incorrectly. For 
example, the 
student may not 
have marked the 
variables. 
Does not 
complete this 
part. 
Marks numbers 
as the parts when 
they are the 
whole and vice 
versa in more 
than one 
instance. 
Computation 
accuracy and 
strategies in 
Question 3. 
Made more than 
two errors in 
computation. 
Made two or 
fewer computation 
errors. 
Made one or no 
computation errors. 
Student work 
indicates that the 
student has at least 
two strategies that are 
being applied beyond 
adding tens and then 
ones or finding 
combinations of ten. 
Are few 
indications of 
any personal 
strategies being 
used. 
Is some indication 
of strategies such 
as adding the tens 
and then the ones 
or finding 
combinations of 
ten, but strategies 
are not apparent 
for all or are not 
discernable from 
the student's work. 
The majority of 
computations 
appear to have 
been done by the 
traditional 
algorithm. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 41 of 51 
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste should be provided for filling in field data. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields
save pdf forms in reader; using pdf forms to collect data
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for learn how to fill-in field data to PDF
extracting data from pdf to excel; exporting pdf data to excel
B. One-on-one Assessment 
Date:  
Directions 
Not Quite There 
Ready to Apply 
Provide a variety of counters 
that can be used to represent 
ones and tens easily, as well as 
paper and pencil. Say, 
"I am 
going to read with you the 
problems on this page. Please 
show me with any of the 
manipulatives you would like 
to use what the problem 
means. Then write the 
equation that goes with what 
you did."  
Story problem does not 
match the action or 
equation. 
Dramatizes with counters 
the problem scenario 
correctly. 
Shows the wrong number 
of counters. 
Records the 
corresponding equation. 
Shows the right number of 
counters, but makes a 
calculation error of the sum 
or difference. 
Does not use the addition 
or subtraction sign and/or 
equal sign in the equation 
appropriately. 
Use several problems similar to 
what you have been using in 
class. Include at least one each 
of addition and subtraction. If 
you are aware the student is 
struggling at that level, use 
smaller numbers and the most 
direct forms first and proceed 
to more difficult forms and or 
larger quantities to establish 
what concepts or skills are 
causing the difficulties. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 42 of 51 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form.
html form output to pdf; pdf form data extraction
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Studio .NET. Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET WinForms
extract data from pdf forms; extracting data from pdf files
If you still need more 
information about the student, 
do the same creation problems 
as in the written whole class 
assessment, but orally. Provide 
a variety of counters, as well as 
paper and pencil. Say, 
"Tell 
me an addition problem that 
you have made up and I will 
write it down." 
Story problem does not call 
for addition or does not 
match the action or 
equation. 
Creates an addition 
scenario, represents the 
numbers with the 
counters and records the 
corresponding equation 
correctly. 
Shows the wrong number 
of counters. 
Miscalculates with the 
counters. 
The personal strategy 
used was apparent and 
effective or the strategy 
described when prompted 
was.  
Does not use the addition 
sign and/or equal sign in 
the equation. 
When a problem has been 
created, say, 
"Show me how 
to solve it with counters. 
Then write the number 
sentence that goes with the 
problem." 
When the student 
completes that, if it has not 
been obvious what personal 
strategy the student used, say,
"Tell me what personal 
strategy you used to solve the 
problem and how it worked."  
Does not have a personal 
strategy. 
Attempts an appropriate, 
recognizable personal 
strategy, but makes an 
error, such as compensating 
by adding instead of 
subtracting. 
If the student creates a problem 
with a sum beyond 100 and 
makes errors in the addition, 
ask the student to create a 
problem with smaller numbers. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 43 of 51 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file.
how to save a pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf into excel
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET. Extract multiple types of image from PDF file in VB.NET, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; extract pdf data to excel
Provide a variety of counters, 
as well as paper and pencil. 
Say, 
"Make up a subtraction 
problem and I will write it 
down. Then show me how to 
solve it with counters. Lastly, 
write the number sentence 
that goes with the problem."  
Story problem does not call 
for subtraction or does not 
match the action or 
equation. 
Creates a subtraction 
scenario, represents the 
numbers with the 
counters, and records the 
corresponding equation 
correctly. 
Shows the wrong number 
of counters. 
Miscalculates with the 
correct number of counters. 
The personal strategy 
used was apparent and 
effective or the strategy 
described when prompted 
was.  
If the student creates a problem 
with a minuend beyond 100 
and makes errors in 
subtracting, ask the student to 
create a problem with smaller 
numbers. 
Does not use the 
subtraction sign and/or 
equal sign in the equation. 
Writes the minuend 
number as the subtrahend 
and vice versa. 
If the student's personal 
strategy is not apparent, say, 
"Tell me what personal 
strategy you used to solve the 
problem and how it worked." 
Does not have a personal 
strategy. 
Attempts a personal 
strategy, but makes an 
error. 
If the student cannot create a 
story problem without prompts, 
say, 
"Create a story problem 
for the number sentence:  
Creates a story problem 
using some of the numbers 
provided but not all.  
Creates a story problem 
that is represented by the 
given number sentence. 
Creates a story problem 
that uses the family of 
numbers, but with a 
different operation, such as 
51 – 33 = 28. 
Gives a possible personal 
strategy explained clearly 
enough to be understood. 
28 + 33  = 51" 
If the student is successful at 
creating a problem to match 
this equation, you might ask,
"What strategy would you 
use to solve this problem?" 
Cannot create a story for 
the equation. 
Cannot give an appropriate 
strategy for solving or 
cannot explain it well 
enough to be understood. 
"Create a story problem for 
the number sentence:  
Creates a story problem 
using some of the numbers 
provided but not all.  
Creates a story problem 
that is represented by the 
given number sentence. 
55 – 18  = 37" 
Creates a story problem for 
55 – 37 = 18. 
Gives a possible personal 
strategy explained clearly 
enough to be understood. 
Creates a story problem 
that uses the family of 
numbers, but with a 
different operation, such as 
18 + 37 = 55. 
If the student is successful at 
creating a problem to match 
this equation, you might ask,
"What strategy would you 
use to solve this problem?" 
Cannot create a story for 
the equation. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 44 of 51 
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
VB.NET Demo Code: Add Form Fields to an Existing PDF File. The demo code below can help you to add form fields to PDF file in VB.NET class.
pdf data extraction; change font size pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Flatten form fields. JavaScript actions. Private data of other applications. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
pdf form save in reader; pdf data extraction tool
If the student was unable to 
create problems with the 
equation as a prompt, try 
checking the student's ability to 
discern addition and 
subtraction situations. Give the 
student several story problems 
for addition and subtraction 
and say,
"Tell me whether 
you would add or subtract to 
find the answers for these 
problems: 
Student gives the wrong 
operation for one or more 
of the problems. 
Student identifies the 
correct operation for each 
of the story problems 
presented. 
1.  There were 38 students
on the playground and 17 
went home. How many 
students
are still on the 
playground? 
2.  There are 40 pairs of 
boots on the boot rack 
and 28 pairs of shoes. 
How many pairs of shoes 
and boots are on the boot 
rack? 
3.  Frank has 16 model cars 
and 7 model airplanes. 
How many model vehicles 
does he have? 
4.  Frank has 16 model cars 
and 7 model airplanes. 
How many more model 
cars than model airplanes 
does he have?" 
Assessment activities can be used with individual students, especially students who may be 
having difficulty with the outcome.  
1.
For students who seem to falter with subtraction more so than addition, ask the student to 
explain to you the connection between addition and subtraction by using manipulatives on 
the part-whole mat as described in Step 3, number five. Turn it as required to start with the 
whole for subtraction or to start with the parts for addition. Coach the student to recognize 
the parts and the whole. Then have the student show how each problem could be transformed 
into the inverse operation. An activity for practising thinking addition for subtraction is to 
have students work in pairs with a calculator. Student one enters a secret number into the 
calculator and then adds to it a number that both students agree upon, such as five. Student 
one enters the equal sign and shows the sum to student two. Student two tells student one 
what the original secret number was by subtracting mentally and then takes the calculator and 
subtracts the five from the sum to verify the secret number. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 45 of 51 
2.
For students who struggle with problems presented with missing addends or minuend or 
subtrahend, concentrate together on problems with these structures. Read them together. 
Have manipulatives available to use as needed. Pose the following questions to guide 
thinking, as necessary: 
Tell me in your own words what the problem says. 
What are each of the numbers in the problem, a part or the whole? 
What is it we have to find out, a part or a whole? 
What number sentence could you write to show the meaning of the problem? 
Does the problem use addition or subtraction (or both, if the student is thinking addition 
to solve for subtraction)? Explain. 
Use a strategy that makes sense to you to find the answer to the problem. Explain your 
thinking as you write the numbers, words or draw a diagram. 
C. Applied Learning 
Provide opportunities for students to use addition and subtraction in a practical situation and 
notice whether or not the strategies transfer. For example, ask a student to compare heights of 
students to the heights of each other, their parents or the teacher. 
Does the student: 
obtain the two measures using nonstandard units and compare them in some way? 
use a personal strategy that makes sense in comparing the two measures? 
There can be many other opportunities to add and subtract in authentic problems. Students can 
keep data on the daily temperature to compare, on money collected so far for a field trip and how 
much is still to come in, on the number of library books signed out by their class each week and 
how many overdue books their class has, on the number of students going home for lunch, 
staying at school or buying milk. Working on data collection and graphing in interesting ways 
will encourage students to suggest topics for which they would like to collect data. All of the 
data collected provides opportunities for mathematics. Some questions and recording methods to 
get students started might include: 
How many students have an 'o' in their first name? Have the students place an "o"-shaped 
cereal on one of two sucker sticks or pipe cleaners that are stuck in a ball of Plasticine. In 
front of one stick place a card that states "Yes" and in front of the other card stating, "No."  
Are you oldest, youngest, only or none of these in your family? Display a chart that states 
these headings in four columns. Give the students each a self-adhesive coloured dot to place 
on the chart in the appropriate column. 
When an opportunity to add or subtract arises that can be integrated with your mathematics, it is 
important to observe how the students go about solving the challenges and having them share 
their personal strategies. It benefits the other students who learn from them and allows you to 
assess the transfer of their mathematics lessons to general practice. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 46 of 51 
Step 5: Follow-up on Assessment 
Guiding Questions 
What conclusions can be made from assessment information? 
How effective have instructional approaches been? 
What are the next steps in instruction? 
A. Addressing Gaps in Learning  
Students who have difficulty solving addition or subtraction problems by using personal 
strategies will enjoy more success if one-on-one time is provided. This time will allow for open 
communication to diagnose where the learning difficulties lie. Observing a student solving 
problems will provide valuable data to guide further instruction. Success in problem solving 
depends on a positive climate in which the students are comfortable taking risks. Find out which 
concepts and skills each student already has and build upon them. 
If the difficulty lies in understanding the problem, use the following strategies: 
Provide problems that relate to the student's interests and personalize the problem by using 
the student's name in the problem and/or the names of his or her friends or family members. 
Initially use smaller numbers in the problem. 
Ask the student the following questions about the problem: 
–  What are you asked to find out? 
–  What do you know? 
–  What information do you need? 
–   Is some of this information unnecessary? 
Have the student paraphrase the problem. 
Guide the student to determine if the numbers refer to a part or the whole. 
Ask the student if the unknown in the problem refers to a part or a whole. 
Provide manipulatives for the students to represent the problem as needed. 
Have the student act out the problem, using other students and manipulatives as needed. 
Have the student decide which operation should be used and why. 
Ask guiding questions to show the connections between addition and subtraction and the 
possible option of thinking addition for subtraction. 
If the difficulty lies in using personal strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems, use 
the following strategies: 
Initially use smaller numbers in the problems. 
Review place value, counting by tens beginning with any number (the hundred chart or base 
ten blocks are useful for this) and number facts. 
Provide counters that can be grouped in tens or base-ten materials as needed. 
Think aloud a personal strategy that you would use to solve the problem and explain why this 
strategy is more efficient than another one that you describe.   
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 47 of 51 
Emphasize flexibility in choosing a personal strategy; a strategy that is efficient for one 
student may not be efficient for another student. 
Build on the student's understanding
of place value and number facts to guide him or her in 
finding a strategy that works. 
Provide ample time for students to think and ask questions to clarify their thinking. 
Have students work in groups so that they learn strategies from one another. 
Guide students to critique various personal strategies to find one that can be used on a variety 
of problems efficiently. 
Have students explain their personal strategies to the class so others can hear how they work 
in kid-friendly language. 
Post various personal strategies in the classroom for students to share and critique. 
B. Reinforcing and Extending Learning 
Students who have achieved or exceeded the outcomes will benefit from ongoing opportunities 
to apply and extend their learning. These activities should support students in developing a 
deeper understanding of the concept and should not progress to the outcomes in subsequent 
grades. 
Consider strategies, such as the following. 
Provide parents information about the importance of students learning to make sense of 
addition and subtraction situations and developing their own strategies for solving these 
problems prior to learning the traditional algorithm. If you need detailed information on the 
rationale to support invented strategies over traditional algorithms, Van de Walle and Lovin 
(2006) compare the two and lay out the benefits of invented strategies (pp. 160, 161). The 
benefits include the enhancement of base ten concepts, fewer errors, a foundation for 
estimation and mental mathematics, and less time consuming, as previously mentioned. 
Other benefits include less reteaching required and student proficiency on standard tests is at 
least equal. Show parents the variations in the structure of story problems that exist. Explain 
that students need practice with all these types of problems and their variations. Let parents 
know that using key words is not a successful strategy. Give them some samples of the kinds 
of strategies that students might invent or adopt as personal strategies, so they understand 
what to look for and encourage. 
Provide suggestions for parents about opportunities to involve their students in authentic 
adding and subtracting situations at home or in the community. For example, at home adding 
might include how many: 
–  loads of wash are done in a week, month or year in your household 
–  pieces of silverware are on the table if each person has a knife, spoon and fork for various 
numbers of settings 
–  cans of food are left in the cupboard if you use 6 to make chili 
–  doors and windows there are in your home 
–  more or less doors and windows are there in another home than yours. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 48 of 51 
In a restaurant, help students use amounts rounded to the closest dollar or up to the next 
dollar to determine how much various options will be or if they have enough money for a 
particular order. 
Take the students shopping and figure out sums of various purchases and differences 
between purchase options (costs may have to be rounded to the next dollar due to the 
limitations of the calculation skills of Grade 2 students). 
Have the students create problems showing the various types of addition and subtraction 
problems (change, both joining and separating; part–part–whole; comparison and equalizing) 
and write appropriate number sentences for each one. These problems can be displayed in a 
chart or on a bulletin board. 
Have the students make their problems more interesting by adding story details or including 
extraneous information and numbers. Have them write their solutions on the backs of these 
problems and share their problems with the class. 
Have the students create problems with different contexts but using the same numbers, such 
as 29 and 21. They could follow this up by having the class decide which of the problems 
could be solved using a given number sentence, such as 29 + 21 = ? 
Have the students critique other students' personal strategies and explain why they work or 
not. Which strategy would be the most efficient and why? 
Have the students write explanations of a personal strategy so that everyone in the class can 
understand it. Challenge the students to solve a problem in a second way. 
www.LearnAlberta.ca 
Grade 2, Number (SO 8, 9) 
© 2008 Alberta Education  
Page 49 of 51 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested