best free pdf library c# : Flatten pdf form in reader SDK application service wpf windows asp.net dnn PrefabNZ_Levers_(Web)0-part2034

How offsite construction can deliver better cost-effective 
housing to more New Zealanders 
PREFAB
Levers for
Flatten pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
pdf form save in reader; how to flatten a pdf form in reader
Flatten pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
edit pdf form in reader; exporting pdf form to excel
This report has been prepared for the Ministry of Business, 
Innovation and Employment (MBIE) by Pamela Bell from 
PrefabNZ Incorporated, with input and assistance from Chris 
Kane (Sector Trends and Innovation, MBIE).
PREFACE
PrefabNZ facilitated a Roundtable 
Discussion with representatives 
of group builders and established 
prefabrication manufacturers 
on Levers for Prefab in October 
2014. The Roundtable was hosted 
by Registered Master Builders 
Association (RMBA) and supported 
by the Productivity Partnership 
within the Ministry of Business, 
Innovation and Employment (MBIE). 
The Levers for Prefab Roundtable 
is the key action point from the 
PrefabNZ Value Case for Prefab 
(2014), supported by BRANZ and 
the Productivity Partnership (MBIE).
PrefabNZ was established in 
2010 as the hub for prebuilt 
construction in New Zealand (NZ). 
PrefabNZ is a non-profit member-
based incorporated society 
representing specifiers (architects, 
designers, and engineers), 
producers (manufacturers, builders 
and distributors) and building 
professionals (quantity surveyors, 
building officials and researchers).
www.prefabnz.com
Images – all courtesy PrefabNZ
Cover main image – Newtown Park Apartments 
Cover small images – Stanley Modular, Smart House (Laing Homes) and Snug at HIVE CH, HIVE CH (Home Innovation 
Village Christchurch) www.homeinnovation.co.nz
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Flatten form fields.
how to fill out a pdf form with reader; extract data from pdf to excel
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Flatten form fields.
pdf data extraction; exporting data from excel to pdf form
1
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
CONTENTS
Proudly supported by:
Executive Summary 
...................... 2
Cutting to the Chase
Background Context 
...................... 4
Roadmap and Value Case
Option Generation 
...................... 10
Top Three Levers for Prefab
Work Programme 
...................... 13
Action Points
Monitoring and Success  
...................... 17
Ones to Watch
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add flatten comments to PDF document online in ASPX webpage. Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without adobe reader installed.
extract pdf data to excel; pdf form save with reader
2
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
To cut to the chase – New Zealand’s construction “pipeline” is 
bulging with Auckland’s latent housing demand, Christchurch’s 
recovery,  weather  tightness  remediation,  and  seismic 
strengthening.
1
We have heard repeatedly that business-as-
usual just won’t cut the mustard.
2
New Zealand’s construction 
industry must both rise to the challenge of increased demand 
and improve the way it does business – it must do more and it 
must do it better.
One way to improve construction 
productivity is to pre-build parts 
of a building away from the final 
site in controlled conditions.
3
Prefabrication, or offsite 
construction, is well researched 
internationally and established in 
many countries around the world, 
particularly northern Europe and 
Scandinavia. In New Zealand, 
we have been prefabricating 
smaller parts as well as complete 
buildings for over 200 years. 
Evidence indicates that more focus 
is needed on the medium-sized 
typologies of panelised (2D) and 
volumetric (3D) construction.
4
It is timely that we now see several of 
the country’s largest home builders 
moving into panel and volume 
production.
5
This is significant 
because the early adopters of 
prefabrication from the 1960s 
onwards have typically been small 
nimble companies led by visionary 
entrepreneurs and in several cases, 
by Dutch immigrants.
6
They have 
also been family-based companies 
involving several generations.
7
There 
have been very few early adopters of 
panel and volumetric construction, 
with the stand-out being Stanley 
Modular who took on the Carters 
Modular facility in Matamata fifteen 
years ago.
8
This is important because we are 
now at the crucial point of witnessing 
the ‘first followers’ – substantial 
followers who are investing $10 
million in manufacturing equipment 
9
– followers that have the power to 
create a fully-fledged movement
10
.
The design and construction industry 
in New Zealand is potentially at the 
‘tipping-point’ of delivering better 
value to clients and importantly to 
embattled first-time homeowners.
It is now vital that we learn from 
the early adopters and first 
followers of prefabrication and 
smooth their path by identifying 
the levers for prefab and acting 
on eliminating challenges and 
creating opportunities. Established 
residential builders identified the 
three levers for prefab of scale, 
liability and show-and-tell:
1.  Scale is collaborating on both 
demand- and supply-side  to 
improve consistency of workflow
2.  Liability is clarifying the 
regulatory compliance process
3.  Show-and-tell is communicating 
prefab benefits to change 
perceptions
A work programme based on these 
three levers forms the basis for 
future outcomes. The first of these 
is the Levers for Prefab Action 
Plan research programme between 
PrefabNZ, BRANZ, MBIE and industry 
partners such as Spanbild. The five-
staged programme covers charting 
prefab through infographics, 
manufactured building systems 
regulation guidance, pipelines for 
social and retirement housing, and 
the launch of a competition for an 
open-source prebuilt component 
suitable for multi-unit housing.
The success of the Levers for 
Prefab roundtable relies on the 
associated work programmes that 
will now ensue. The commitment 
areas of the stakeholders are:
3
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
1.  Construction Pipeline Report 2, NZ Building and 
Construction Productivity Partnership (2014)
2.  Value Case for Prefab, PrefabNZ with BRANZ + 
Productivity Partnership (2014)
3.  Prefabrication  and  Modularisation:  Increasing 
Productivity in the Construction Sector, McGraw-Hill 
(2011)
4.  Kiwi Prefab: Prefabricated Housing in New Zealand, P. 
Bell (2009)
5.  Mike Greer Homes in joint venture with Spanbild 
(Concision 2014) and Stonewood Homes with Arrow 
International  for  bathroom  pods  (Construction 
Components  2014)
6.  Such as De Geest and Lockwood.
7.  Such as Keith Hay Homes, Touchwood and also 
Lockwood
8.  Stanley has gone on to deliver the most innovative 
volumetric and panel projects in the country, including 
the Chateau Tongariro extension (2005) and Elam Hall 
at the University of Auckland (2012).
9.  Concision (2014)
10. Derek Sivers TED Talk 2010
MBIE provides regulation 
guidance and lays out housing 
strategy priorities including 
affordable housing and 
continuing work begun by the 
Productivity Partnership
BRANZ continues to advocate 
for increased efficiency in 
construction in order to deliver 
added value to clients and the 
general public as users of the 
built environment
RMBA is focused on keeping 
members up to date, future-
proofing skills and creating 
linkages across future-focused 
builders as well as those content 
with the status quo
PrefabNZ is a member-
based peak body for offsite 
construction pushing for 
increased uptake of prebuilt 
technologies through research, 
advocacy and information
Together we can encourage change 
through sharing of information, 
actions and inspired precedents.
Footnotes:
Bad Aibling, Germany
4
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
New Zealand’s design and construction industry is documented 
in a number of key reports as highlighted in this section. 
International reports  link  productivity, prefabrication and 
digital technology (building information management) as three 
ways forward for improvements in reducing time and remedial 
work, and creating more collaborative environments for cost-
savings and delivering better quality and value to both clients 
and end-users (Prefabrication and Modularisation: Increasing 
Productivity in the Construction Industry, McGraw-Hill 2011).
Uptake of prefabrication (Housing Sector only). Source : PrefabAUS + PrefabNZ
Australia
3%
With an ambition to achieve 10% of the market by 2020
UK
4%
Prefab housing makes up less than 4% of new buildings (2005)
Spain and France
5%
In France this figure is rapidly increasing due to strict building green codes
Germany
20%
Increasing due to speed, quality and user demand for sustainable construction
New Zealand
32%
Mostly wall framing, roof trusses, windows and joinery (BRANZ 2013)
North America
33%
Up to 1/3 all new single-family houses are modular or manufactured
Japan
35%
Prefabrication seen as a medium to high-end product
Finland
50%
Quality focus for prefabrication, long acceptance of prefabrication
Sweden
90%
Quality focus for prefabrication, panelised housing is the norm
Prefabrication, also known as 
prefab and/or offsite manufacture, 
is an approach to constructing the 
built environment that has been at 
the leading edge of innovation for 
a number of years. It simply means 
manufacturing and assembling 
whole buildings or substantial parts 
of buildings in controlled conditions 
prior to installation at their final 
location. Prefabrication spans from 
small components, two-dimensional 
panels, three-dimensional volumes 
through to complete buildings, 
including hybrid mixtures of these 
types or with traditional.
Internationally there are growing 
global trends towards more use of 
offsite construction. Prefabrication 
uptake is measured in a number 
of ways at a point in time and can 
be loosely summarised in the table 
below.
Additionally, BRANZ estimates 
that 28% of all new commercial 
building work uses prefabricated 
components.
11
It is clear from this 
international overview that NZ 
5
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
has potential gains if it is to learn 
from Scandinavian and Northern 
European countries that face similar 
weather and population conditions.
Why now?
The Productivity Partnership’s 
National Construction Pipeline 
(2014) shows construction 
reaching a 40 year high in 2016-
2017 with $35 billion of work in 
progress. This unprecedented 
demand creates the need for more 
efficient construction solutions to 
deal with a constrained workforce 
and product manufacture.
New Zealand needs more quality 
cost-effective housing – 30,000 
houses are needed urgently 
in Auckland and Canterbury.
12
Construction demand is increasing 
by 10% per year for the next 
four years – past booms show 
that when construction demand 
goes up, quality goes down.
13
At 
the cusp of 2015, the uptake of 
prefabrication has been likened to 
an ‘explosion’ with a much wider 
range of prebuilt products entering 
the market. 
This is in part attributed to the 
work that PrefabNZ has led around 
delivering a portal website, 
email newsletters, setting up the 
first Home Innovation Village in 
Christchurch (HIVE CH), regional 
industry events with site visits, 
annual conference with hands-
on interactive manufacturing and 
project sites, plus close affiliation 
with the national Kiwi Prefab: 
Cottage to Cutting Edge exhibition, 
Footnotes:
11. What’s hot and what’s not, M. Curtis in Build 145, December 2014 / January 2015, p.61
12. Value Case for Prefab, PrefabNZ (2014).
13. Ibid.
Smart House (Laing Homes) at HIVE CH
6
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
book, and representing offsite on 
the Construction Industry Council 
(CIC). PrefabNZ ongoing work 
programmes build on results to 
date and focus on more public 
outreach through showcase 
housing in Wellington (HIVE WN), 
engineered timber and export 
markets, as well as further action-
oriented research programmes on 
technical issues to reduce barriers 
to uptake.
BRANZ’s work to quantify the 
historical uptake and future 
potential of prefabrication can 
be seen in Prefabrication and 
Standardisation Potential in 
Buildings (2014). They estimate 
$2.95 billion of prefabrication 
currently occurs in New Zealand 
each year, most of which is in the 
area of wall and roof framing. This 
indicates the market is already 
relatively substantial, but limited 
to a small number of components. 
Based on the additional parts of 
buildings that can be prebuilt 
relatively easily, they estimate up 
to $5 billion of prefabrication can 
be done each year, an increase of 
$2 billion.
Why focus on prefab?
A 1% increase in labour 
productivity is worth $300 million 
to the NZ economy according to 
Valuing the Role of Construction 
in the New Zealand Economy 
(Price Waterhouse Coopers 2011). 
This is a similar finding to BERL’s 
2003 report that a 10% increase in 
labour productivity would increase 
GDP by $2 billion – roughly 10% 
Prefab uptake: Percentage of new building by value that 
is prefabrication
Dec 2013
Dec 2012
June 2012
Residential
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0
Non-Residential
All Buildings
BRANZ survey
Value of all construction, historic forecast
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
72 74 4 76 78 80 0 82 2 84 86 6 88 8 90 92 2 94 4 96 98 8 00 0 02 04 06 6 08 8 10 12 2 14
$ Billion
16 18 8 20
28%
29%
Residential
Non-Residential
Total
Source: National Construction Pipeline, Productivity Partnership 2014
Source: SR312, BRANZ 2014
7
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
increase in construction sector 
productivity = 1% increase in GDP.
A renewed focus on productivity 
led to the industry and 
government joining together 
from 2011 – 2014 in the Building 
and Construction Productivity 
Partnership which set the goal 
of achieving a 20% improvement 
in productivity by 2020. Leading 
reports from the Partnership 
included the Research Action 
Plan (2012) that identified 
prefabrication and the need to 
reduce barriers to its uptake.
The Building a Better New Zealand: 
Industry Research Strategy (2012) 
is a collaborative outcome between 
BRANZ, MBIE, the Construction 
Industry Council (CIC) and the 
Construction Strategy Group (CSG). 
Nine research themes include areas 
that prefabrication contributes 
to in boosting productivity, 
introducing new technologies, 
meeting housing needs and 
building better cities.
PrefabNZ was formed by 
industry in 2010 as a non-profit 
member-based association to 
lead information, education and 
collaboration around prebuilt 
construction. The goal of PrefabNZ 
remains to increase the uptake 
of prefabrication to 40% of all 
building components by 2020. The 
PrefabNZ Prefab Roadmap for New 
Zealand 2013–2018 (2012) further 
sets out an action plan for the 
industry as well as summarising 
related research findings.
Koch, Germany
8
LEVERS FOR PREFAB
A Value Case for Prefab 
The Prefab Roadmap also pointed 
to the creation of a Value Case 
for Prefab as a key action to 
address the challenge of historical 
misconceptions associated with 
the prefab term. The Value Case 
quantifies potential benefits of 
prefabrication in monetary terms. 
MBIE – Residential growth off a low-base,  
led by Auckland construction
MBIE – high-density residential construction  
will be increasingly important
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
Numbers
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Quarters
Multi-Units
Detached
Trend Multi-Units
Trend Detached
250
200
150
100
50
0
$ Millions
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q1
Quarters
Auckland
Canterbury
Waikato/BoP
Wellington
Rest of NZ
Prefab Roadmap
In 2013, PrefabNZ identified 
four key issues inhibiting the 
uptake of prefabrication:
Broadening perceptions 
through information to 
combat misconceptions
Connecting with clients to 
increase market size
Assisting innovation to 
market
Spreading technical 
knowledge to increase 
awareness.
The Roadmap for Prefab 
identified five action areas:
Research
Communication
Dissemination
Education
Demonstration.
The outcomes and outputs, 
relative priority, and 
stakeholders continue to 
drive work in progress with 
leadership primarily from 
PrefabNZ www.prefabnz.
com, BRANZ www.branz.
co.nz and MBIE / Productivity 
Partnership www.
buildingvalue.co.nz.  
MBIE, 2014
MBIE, 2014
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested