zxing pdf417 c# : Extract data from pdf form fields application control tool html web page .net online print17-part2066

Categoriesp114:
Flow contentp117
.
Palpable contentp118
.
Contexts in which this element can be usedp114:
Whereflow contentp117
is expected.
Content modelp114:
Flow contentp117
, but with noheaderp170
,footerp171
, ormainp204
element descendants.
Tag omission in text/htmlp114:
Neither tag is omissible.
Content attributesp114:
Global attributesp121
DOM interfacep114:
UsesHTMLElementp113
.
Thefooterp171
elementrepresentsp112
a footer for its nearest ancestorsectioning contentp117
orsectioning rootp175
element. A footer typically
contains information about its section such as who wrote it, links to related documents, copyright data, and the like.
When thefooterp171
element contains entire sections, theyrepresentp112
appendices, indexes, long colophons, verbose license agreements, and
other such content.
</dl>
</header>
Theheaderp170
element is notsectioning contentp117
; it doesn't introduce a new section.
Note
In this example, the page has a page heading given by theh1p167
element, and two subsections whose headings are given byh2p167
elements. The content after theheaderp170
element is still part of the last subsection started in theheaderp170
element, because the
headerp170
element doesn't take part in theoutlinep176
algorithm.
<body>
<header>
<h1>Little Green Guys With Guns</h1>
<nav>
<ul>
<li><a href="/games">Games</a>
<li><a href="/forum">Forum</a>
<li><a href="/download">Download</a>
</ul>
</nav>
<h2>Important News</h2> <!-- this starts a second subsection -->
<!-- this is part of the subsection entitled "Important News" -->
<p>To play today's games you will need to update your client.</p>
<h2>Games</h2> <!-- this starts a third subsection -->
</header>
<p>You have three active games:</p>
<!-- this is still part of the subsection entitled "Games" -->
...
Example
Contact information for the author or editor of a section belongs in anaddressp173
element, possibly itself inside afooterp171
. Bylines
and other information that could be suitable for both aheaderp170
or afooterp171
can be placed in either (or neither). The primary
purpose of these elements is merely to help the author write self-explanatory markup that is easy to maintain and style; they are not
intended to impose specific structures on authors.
Note
4.3.9 Thefooterelement
Spec bugs:12990
171
Extract data from pdf form fields - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
using pdf forms to collect data; edit pdf form in reader
Extract data from pdf form fields - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract table data from pdf to excel; pdf data extraction to excel
Footers don't necessarily have to appear at theendof a section, though they usually do.
When the nearest ancestorsectioning contentp117
orsectioning rootp175
element isthe body elementp108
, then it applies to the whole page.
Thefooterp171
element is notsectioning contentp117
; it doesn't introduce a new section.
Note
Here is a page with two footers, one at the top and one at the bottom, with the same content:
<body>
<footer><a href="../">Back to index...</a></footer>
<hgroup>
<h1>Lorem ipsum</h1>
<h2>The ipsum of all lorems</h2>
</hgroup>
<p>A dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod
tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim
veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex
ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in
voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla
pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in
culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p>
<footer><a href="../">Back to index...</a></footer>
</body>
Example
Here is an example which shows thefooterp171
element being used both for a site-wide footer and for a section footer.
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<HTML LANG="en"><HEAD>
<TITLE>The Ramblings of a Scientist</TITLE>
<BODY>
<H1>The Ramblings of a Scientist</H1>
<ARTICLE>
<H1>Episode 15</H1>
<VIDEO SRC="/fm/015.ogv" CONTROLS PRELOAD>
<P><A HREF="/fm/015.ogv">Download video</A>.</P>
</VIDEO>
<FOOTER> <!-- footer for article -->
<P>Published <TIME DATETIME="2009-10-21T18:26-07:00">on 2009/10/21 at 6:26pm</TIME></P>
</FOOTER>
</ARTICLE>
<ARTICLE>
<H1>My Favorite Trains</H1>
<P>I love my trains. My favorite train of all time is a Köf.</P>
<P>It is fun to see them pull some coal cars because they look so
dwarfed in comparison.</P>
<FOOTER> <!-- footer for article -->
<P>Published <TIME DATETIME="2009-09-15T14:54-07:00">on 2009/09/15 at 2:54pm</TIME></P>
</FOOTER>
</ARTICLE>
<FOOTER> <!-- site wide footer -->
<NAV>
<P><A HREF="/credits.html">Credits</A> —
<A HREF="/tos.html">Terms of Service</A> —
<A HREF="/index.html">Blog Index</A></P>
</NAV>
<P>Copyright © 2009 Gordon Freeman</P>
</FOOTER>
</BODY>
</HTML>
Example
Example
172
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste should be provided for filling in field data. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields
how to save a pdf form in reader; exporting pdf data to excel
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for learn how to fill-in field data to PDF
pdf form data extraction; exporting pdf form to excel
Categoriesp114:
Flow contentp117
.
Palpable contentp118
.
Contexts in which this element can be usedp114:
Whereflow contentp117
is expected.
Content modelp114:
Flow contentp117
, but with noheading contentp117
descendants, nosectioning contentp117
descendants, and noheaderp170
,footerp171
,
oraddressp173
element descendants.
Tag omission in text/htmlp114:
Neither tag is omissible.
Content attributesp114:
Global attributesp121
DOM interfacep114:
UsesHTMLElementp113
.
Theaddressp173
elementrepresentsp112
the contact information for its nearestarticlep157
orbodyp156
element ancestor. If that isthe body
elementp108
, then the contact information applies to the document as a whole.
Some site designs have what is sometimes referred to as "fat footers" — footers that contain a lot of material, including images, links to
other articles, links to pages for sending feedback, special offers... in some ways, a whole "front page" in the footer.
This fragment shows the bottom of a page on a site with a "fat footer":
...
<footer>
<nav>
<section>
<h1>Articles</h1>
<p><img src="images/somersaults.jpeg" alt=""> Go to the gym with
our somersaults class! Our teacher Jim takes you through the paces
in this two-part article. <a href="articles/somersaults/1">Part
1</a> · <a href="articles/somersaults/2">Part 2</a></p>
<p><img src="images/kindplus.jpeg"> Tired of walking on the edge of
a clif<!-- sic -->? Our guest writer Lara shows you how to bumble
your way through the bars. <a href="articles/kindplus/1">Read
more...</a></p>
<p><img src="images/crisps.jpeg"> The chips are down, now all
that's left is a potato. What can you do with it? <a
href="articles/crisps/1">Read more...</a></p>
</section>
<ul>
<li> <a href="/about">About us...</a>
<li> <a href="/feedback">Send feedback!</a>
<li> <a href="/sitemap">Sitemap</a>
</ul>
</nav>
<p><small>Copyright © 2015 The Snacker —
<a href="/tos">Terms of Service</a></small></p>
</footer>
</body>
For example, a page at the W3C Web site related to HTML might include the following contact information:
Example
4.3.10 Theaddresselement
173
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form.
extract data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Studio .NET. Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET WinForms
how to save a filled out pdf form in reader; fill in pdf form reader
Theaddressp173
element must not be used to represent arbitrary addresses (e.g. postal addresses), unless those addresses are in fact the
relevant contact information. (Thepp186
element is the appropriate element for marking up postal addresses in general.)
Theaddressp173
element must not contain information other than contact information.
Typically, theaddressp173
element would be included along with other information in afooterp171
element.
The contact information for a nodenodeis a collection ofaddressp173
elements defined by the first applicable entry from the following list:
Ifnodeis anarticlep157
element
Ifnodeis abodyp156
element
The contact information consists of all theaddressp173
elements that havenodeas an ancestor and do not have anotherbodyp156
or
articlep157
element ancestor that is a descendant ofnode.
Ifnodehas an ancestor element that is anarticlep157
element
Ifnodehas an ancestor element that is abodyp156
element
The contact information ofnodeis the same as the contact information of the nearestarticlep157
orbodyp156
element ancestor,
whichever is nearest.
Ifnode'snode document
hasa body elementp108
The contact information ofnodeis the same as the contact information ofthe body elementp108
of theDocumentp103
.
Otherwise
There is no contact information fornode.
User agents may expose the contact information of a node to the user, or use it for other purposes, such as indexing sections based on the
sections' contact information.
Theh1p167
h6p167
elements and thehgroupp168
element are headings.
The first element ofheading contentp117
in an element ofsectioning contentp117
representsp112
the heading for that section. Subsequent headings of
equal or higherrankp167
start new (implied) sections, headings of lowerrankp167
start implied subsections that are part of the previous one. In both
cases, the elementrepresentsp112
the heading of the implied section.
<ADDRESS>
<A href="../People/Raggett/">Dave Raggett</A>,
<A href="../People/Arnaud/">Arnaud Le Hors</A>,
contact persons for the <A href="Activity">W3C HTML Activity</A>
</ADDRESS>
For example, the following is non-conforming use of theaddressp173
element:
<ADDRESS>Last Modified: 1999/12/24 23:37:50</ADDRESS>
Example
In this example the footer contains contact information and a copyright notice.
<footer>
<address>
For more details, contact
<a href="mailto:js@example.com">John Smith</a>.
</address>
<p><small>© copyright 2038 Example Corp.</small></p>
</footer>
Example
4.3.11Headings and sections
174
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file.
export excel to pdf form; pdf form save in reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET. Extract multiple types of image from PDF file in VB.NET, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET
export pdf data to excel; exporting data from pdf to excel
Certain elements are said to besectioning roots, includingblockquotep191
andtdp409
elements. These elements can have their own outlines,
but the sections and headings inside these elements do not contribute to the outlines of their ancestors.
blockquotep191
,bodyp156
,detailsp544
,dialogp559
,fieldsetp505
,figurep201
,tdp409
Sectioning contentp117
elements are always considered subsections of their nearest ancestorsectioning rootp175
or their nearest ancestor element of
sectioning contentp117
, whichever is nearest, regardless of what implied sections other headings may have created.
Sections may contain headings of anyrankp167
, but authors are strongly encouraged to either use onlyh1p167
elements, or to use elements of the
appropriaterankp167
for the section's nesting level.
Authors are also encouraged to explicitly wrap sections in elements ofsectioning contentp117
, instead of relying on the implicit sections generated by
having multiple headings in one element ofsectioning contentp117
.
For the following fragment:
<body>
<h1>Foo</h1>
<h2>Bar</h2>
<blockquote>
<h3>Bla</h3>
</blockquote>
<p>Baz</p>
<h2>Quux</h2>
<section>
<h3>Thud</h3>
</section>
<p>Grunt</p>
</body>
...the structure would be:
1. Foo (heading of explicitbodyp156
section, containing the "Grunt" paragraph)
1. Bar (heading starting implied section, containing a block quote and the "Baz" paragraph)
2. Quux (heading starting implied section with no content other than the heading itself)
3. Thud (heading of explicitsectionp159
section)
Notice how thesectionp159
ends the earlier implicit section so that a later paragraph ("Grunt") is back at the top level.
Example
For example, the following is correct:
<body>
<h4>Apples</h4>
<p>Apples are fruit.</p>
<section>
<h2>Taste</h2>
<p>They taste lovely.</p>
<h6>Sweet</h6>
<p>Red apples are sweeter than green ones.</p>
<h1>Colour</h1>
<p>Apples come in various colours.</p>
</section>
</body>
However, the same document would be more clearly expressed as:
<body>
<h1>Apples</h1>
<p>Apples are fruit.</p>
<section>
<h2>Taste</h2>
Example
175
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
VB.NET Demo Code: Add Form Fields to an Existing PDF File. The demo code below can help you to add form fields to PDF file in VB.NET class.
java read pdf form fields; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Flatten form fields. JavaScript actions. Private data of other applications. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
pdf data extractor; extract data from pdf into excel
4.3.11.1 Creating an outline
This section defines an algorithm for creating an outline for asectioning contentp117
element or asectioning rootp175
element. It is defined in terms of
a walk over the nodes of a DOM tree, intree order
, with each node being visited when it isenteredand when it isexitedduring the walk.
Theoutlinefor asectioning contentp117
element or asectioning rootp175
element consists of a list of one or more potentially nestedsectionsp176
. The
element for which anoutlinep176
is created is said to bethe outline's owner.
Asectionis a container that corresponds to some nodes in the original DOM tree. Each section can have one heading associated with it, and can
contain any number of further nested sections. The algorithm for the outline also associates each node in the DOM tree with a particular section and
potentially a heading. (The sections in the outline aren'tsectionp159
elements, though some may correspond to such elements — they are merely
conceptual sections.)
<p>They taste lovely.</p>
<section>
<h3>Sweet</h3>
<p>Red apples are sweeter than green ones.</p>
</section>
</section>
<section>
<h2>Colour</h2>
<p>Apples come in various colours.</p>
</section>
</body>
Both of the documents above are semantically identical and would produce the same outline in compliant user agents.
This third example is also semantically identical, and might be easier to maintain (e.g. if sections are often moved around in editing):
<body>
<h1>Apples</h1>
<p>Apples are fruit.</p>
<section>
<h1>Taste</h1>
<p>They taste lovely.</p>
<section>
<h1>Sweet</h1>
<p>Red apples are sweeter than green ones.</p>
</section>
</section>
<section>
<h1>Colour</h1>
<p>Apples come in various colours.</p>
</section>
</body>
This final example would need explicit style rules to be rendered well in legacy browsers. Legacy browsers without CSS support would
render all the headings as top-level headings.
The following markup fragment:
<body>
<h1>A</h1>
<p>B</p>
<h2>C</h2>
<p>D</p>
<h2>E</h2>
<p>F</p>
</body>
Example
176
The algorithm that must be followed during a walk of a DOM subtree rooted at asectioning contentp117
element or asectioning rootp175
element to
determine that element'soutlinep176
is as follows:
1. Letcurrent outline targetbe null. (It holds the element whoseoutlinep176
is being created.)
2. Letcurrent sectionbe null. (It holds a pointer to asectionp176
, so that elements in the DOM can all be associated with a section.)
3. Create a stack to hold elements, which is used to handle nesting. Initialise this stack to empty.
4. Walk over the DOM intree order
, starting with thesectioning contentp117
element orsectioning rootp175
element at the root of the subtree
for which an outline is to be created, and trigger the first relevant step below for each element as the walk enters and exits it.
When exiting an element, if that element is the element at the top of the stack
Pop that element from the stack.
If the top of the stack is aheading contentp117
element or an element with ahiddenp708
attribute
Do nothing.
When entering an element with ahiddenp708
attribute
Push the element being entered onto the stack. (This causes the algorithm to skip that element and any descendants of the
element.)
When entering asectioning contentp117
element
Run these steps:
1. Ifcurrent outline targetis not null, run these substeps:
1. If thecurrent sectionhas no heading, create an implied heading and let that be the heading for the
current section.
2. Pushcurrent outline targetonto the stack.
2. Letcurrent outline targetbe the element that is being entered.
3. Letcurrent sectionbe a newly createdsectionp176
for thecurrent outline targetelement.
4. Associatecurrent outline targetwithcurrent section.
5. Let there be a newoutlinep176
for the newcurrent outline target, initialised with just the newcurrent sectionas the
onlysectionp176
in the outline.
When exiting asectioning contentp117
element, if the stack is not empty
Run these steps:
1. If thecurrent sectionhas no heading, create an implied heading and let that be the heading for thecurrent section.
2. Pop the top element from the stack, and let thecurrent outline targetbe that element.
3. Letcurrent sectionbe the last section in theoutlinep176
of thecurrent outline targetelement.
4. Append theoutlinep176
of thesectioning contentp117
element being exited to thecurrent section. (This does not
change which section is the last section in theoutlinep176
.)
...results in the following outline being created for thebodyp156
node (and thus the entire document):
1. Section created forbodyp156
node.
Associated with heading "A".
Also associated with paragraph "B".
Nested sections:
1. Section implied for firsth2p167
element.
Associated with heading "C".
Also associated with paragraph "D".
No nested sections.
2. Section implied for secondh2p167
element.
Associated with heading "E".
Also associated with paragraph "F".
No nested sections.
The element being exited is aheading contentp117
element or an element with ahiddenp708
attribute.
Note
177
When entering asectioning rootp175
element
Run these steps:
1. Ifcurrent outline targetis not null, pushcurrent outline targetonto the stack.
2. Letcurrent outline targetbe the element that is being entered.
3. Letcurrent outline target'sparent sectionbecurrent section.
4. Letcurrent sectionbe a newly createdsectionp176
for thecurrent outline targetelement.
5. Let there be a newoutlinep176
for the newcurrent outline target, initialised with just the newcurrent sectionas the
onlysectionp176
in the outline.
When exiting asectioning rootp175
element, if the stack is not empty
Run these steps:
1. If thecurrent sectionhas no heading, create an implied heading and let that be the heading for thecurrent section.
2. Letcurrent sectionbecurrent outline target'sparent section.
3. Pop the top element from the stack, and let thecurrent outline targetbe that element.
When exiting asectioning contentp117
element or asectioning rootp175
element (when the stack is empty)
If thecurrent sectionhas no heading, create an implied heading and let that be the heading for thecurrent section.
Skip to the next step in the overall set of steps. (The walk is over.)
When entering aheading contentp117
element
If thecurrent sectionhas no heading, let the element being entered be the heading for thecurrent section.
Otherwise, if the element being entered has arankp167
equal to or higher than the heading of the last section of theoutlinep176
of thecurrent outline target, or if the heading of the last section of theoutlinep176
of thecurrent outline targetis an implied
heading, then create a newsectionp176
and append it to theoutlinep176
of thecurrent outline targetelement, so that this new
section is the new last section of that outline. Letcurrent sectionbe that new section. Let the element being entered be the
new heading for thecurrent section.
Otherwise, run these substeps:
1. Letcandidate sectionbecurrent section.
2. Heading loop: If the element being entered has arankp167
lower than therankp167
of the heading of thecandidate
section, then create a newsectionp176
, and append it tocandidate section. (This does not change which section is
the last section in the outline.) Letcurrent sectionbe this new section. Let the element being entered be the new
heading for thecurrent section. Abort these substeps.
3. Letnew candidate sectionbe thesectionp176
that containscandidate sectionin theoutlinep176
ofcurrent outline
target.
4. Letcandidate sectionbenew candidate section.
5. Return to the step labeledheading loop.
Push the element being entered onto the stack. (This causes the algorithm to skip any descendants of the element.)
Otherwise
Do nothing.
In addition, whenever the walk exits a node, after doing the steps above, if the node is not associated with asectionp176
yet, associate
the node with thesectionp176
current section.
Thecurrent outline targetis the element being exited, and it is thesectioning contentp117
element or asectioning
rootp175
element at the root of the subtree for which an outline is being generated.
Note
Recall thath1p167
has thehighestrank, andh6p167
has the lowest rank.
Note
178
5. Associate all non-element nodes that are in the subtree for which an outline is being created with thesectionp176
with which their parent
element is associated.
6. Associate all nodes in the subtree with the heading of thesectionp176
with which they are associated, if any.
The tree of sections created by the algorithm above, or a proper subset thereof, must be used when generating document outlines, for example
when generating tables of contents.
The outline created forthe body elementp108
of aDocumentp103
is theoutlinep176
of the entire document.
When creating an interactive table of contents, entries should jump the user to the relevantsectioning contentp117
element, if thesectionp176
was
created for a real element in the original document, or to the relevantheading contentp117
element, if thesectionp176
in the tree was generated for a
heading in the above process.
Theoutline depthof aheading contentp117
element associated with asectionp176
sectionis the number ofsectionsp176
that are ancestors ofsection
in the outermostoutlinep176
thatsectionfinds itself in when theoutlinesp176
of itsDocumentp103
's elements are created, plus 1. Theoutline depthp179
of aheading contentp117
element not associated with asectionp176
is 1.
User agents should provide default headings for sections that do not have explicit section headings.
Selecting the firstsectionp176
of the document therefore always takes the user to the top of the document, regardless of where the first
heading in thebodyp156
is to be found.
Note
Consider the following snippet:
<body>
<nav>
<p><a href="/">Home</a></p>
</nav>
<p>Hello world.</p>
<aside>
<p>My cat is cute.</p>
</aside>
</body>
Although it contains no headings, this snippet has three sections: a document (thebodyp156
) with two subsections (anavp162
and an
asidep165
). A user agent could present the outline as follows:
1. Untitled document
1. Navigation
2. Sidebar
These default headings ("Untitled document", "Navigation", "Sidebar") are not specified by this specification, and might vary with the
user's language, the page's language, the user's preferences, the user agent implementor's preferences, etc.
Example
The following JavaScript function shows how the tree walk could be implemented. Therootargument is the root of the tree to walk (either
asectioning contentp117
element or asectioning rootp175
element), and theenterandexitarguments are callbacks that are called with the
nodes as they are entered and exited.[JAVASCRIPT]p1161
function (root, enter, exit) {
var node = root;
start: while (node) {
enter(node);
if (node.firstChild) {
node = node.firstChild;
continue start;
}
while (node) {
exit(node);
if (node == root) {
node = null;
} else if (node.nextSibling) {
Note
179
4.3.11.2 Sample outlines
This section is non-normative.
node = node.nextSibling;
continue start;
} else {
node = node.parentNode;
}
}
}
}
The following document shows a straight-forward application of theoutlinep176
algorithm. First, here is the document, which is a book
with very short chapters and subsections:
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang=en>
<title>The Tax Book (all in one page)</title>
<h1>The Tax Book</h1>
<h2>Earning money</h2>
<p>Earning money is good.</p>
<h3>Getting a job</h3>
<p>To earn money you typically need a job.</p>
<h2>Spending money</h2>
<p>Spending is what money is mainly used for.</p>
<h3>Cheap things</h3>
<p>Buying cheap things often not cost-effective.</p>
<h3>Expensive things</h3>
<p>The most expensive thing is often not the most cost-effective either.</p>
<h2>Investing money</h2>
<p>You can lend your money to other people.</p>
<h2>Losing money</h2>
<p>If you spend money or invest money, sooner or later you will lose money.
<h3>Poor judgement</h3>
<p>Usually if you lose money it's because you made a mistake.</p>
This book would form the following outline:
1. The Tax Book
1. Earning money
1. Getting a job
2. Spending money
1. Cheap things
2. Expensive things
3. Investing money
4. Losing money
1. Poor judgement
Notice that thetitlep136
element does not participate in the outline.
Example
Here is a similar document, but this time usingsectionp159
elements to get the same effect:
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang=en>
<title>The Tax Book (all in one page)</title>
<h1>The Tax Book</h1>
<section>
<h1>Earning money</h1>
<p>Earning money is good.</p>
Example
180
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested