12.2.5.2 Parsing elements that contain only text...............................................................................1008
12.2.5.3 Closing elements that have implied end tags......................................................................1008
12.2.5.4 The rules for parsing tokens in HTML content....................................................................1008
12.2.5.4.1 The "initial" insertion mode.............................................................................1008
12.2.5.4.2 The "before html" insertion mode...................................................................1010
12.2.5.4.3 The "before head" insertion mode..................................................................1011
12.2.5.4.4 The "in head" insertion mode.........................................................................1012
12.2.5.4.5 The "in head noscript" insertion mode............................................................1014
12.2.5.4.6 The "after head" insertion mode.....................................................................1014
12.2.5.4.7 The "in body" insertion mode..........................................................................1015
12.2.5.4.8 The "text" insertion mode...............................................................................1026
12.2.5.4.9 The "in table" insertion mode..........................................................................1027
12.2.5.4.10 The "in table text" insertion mode.................................................................1029
12.2.5.4.11 The "in caption" insertion mode....................................................................1029
12.2.5.4.12 The "in column group" insertion mode..........................................................1030
12.2.5.4.13 The "in table body" insertion mode...............................................................1031
12.2.5.4.14 The "in row" insertion mode..........................................................................1032
12.2.5.4.15 The "in cell" insertion mode..........................................................................1033
12.2.5.4.16 The "in select" insertion mode......................................................................1034
12.2.5.4.17 The "in select in table" insertion mode.........................................................1035
12.2.5.4.18 The "in template" insertion mode..................................................................1036
12.2.5.4.19 The "after body" insertion mode...................................................................1037
12.2.5.4.20 The "in frameset" insertion mode.................................................................1037
12.2.5.4.21 The "after frameset" insertion mode.............................................................1038
12.2.5.4.22 The "after after body" insertion mode...........................................................1038
12.2.5.4.23 The "after after frameset" insertion mode.....................................................1039
12.2.5.5 The rules for parsing tokens in foreign content...................................................................1039
12.2.6 The end....................................................................................................................................................1042
12.2.7 Coercing an HTML DOM into an infoset..................................................................................................1043
12.2.8 An introduction to error handling and strange cases in the parser...........................................................1043
12.2.8.1 Misnested tags: <b><i></b></i>..........................................................................................1044
12.2.8.2 Misnested tags: <b><p></b></p>.......................................................................................1044
12.2.8.3 Unexpected markup in tables..............................................................................................1046
12.2.8.4 Scripts that modify the page as it is being parsed...............................................................1047
12.2.8.5 The execution of scripts that are moving across multiple documents.................................1048
12.2.8.6 Unclosed formatting elements.............................................................................................1049
12.3 Serialising HTML fragments..........................................................................................................................................1050
12.4 Parsing HTML fragments..............................................................................................................................................1052
12.5 Named character references.........................................................................................................................................1053
13 The XHTML syntax.............................................................................................................................................................................1063
13.1 Writing XHTML documents............................................................................................................................................1063
13.2 Parsing XHTML documents..........................................................................................................................................1063
13.3 Serialising XHTML fragments........................................................................................................................................1064
13.4 Parsing XHTML fragments............................................................................................................................................1065
14 Rendering...........................................................................................................................................................................................1067
14.1 Introduction....................................................................................................................................................................1067
14.2 The CSS user agent style sheet and presentational hints............................................................................................1067
14.3 Non-replaced elements.................................................................................................................................................1068
14.3.1 Hidden elements......................................................................................................................................1068
14.3.2 The page..................................................................................................................................................1068
21
Pdf form save in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; save pdf forms in reader
Pdf form save in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
html form output to pdf; pdf data extraction tool
14.3.3 Flow content.............................................................................................................................................1069
14.3.4 Phrasing content......................................................................................................................................1071
14.3.5 Bidirectional text.......................................................................................................................................1073
14.3.6 Quotes......................................................................................................................................................1073
14.3.7 Sections and headings.............................................................................................................................1080
14.3.8 Lists..........................................................................................................................................................1080
14.3.9 Tables.......................................................................................................................................................1081
14.3.10 Margin collapsing quirks.........................................................................................................................1086
14.3.11 Form controls..........................................................................................................................................1086
14.3.12 Thehrelement......................................................................................................................................1087
14.3.13 Thefieldsetandlegendelements..................................................................................................1088
14.4 Replaced elements........................................................................................................................................................1088
14.4.1 Embedded content...................................................................................................................................1088
14.4.2 Images......................................................................................................................................................1089
14.4.3 Attributes for embedded content and images...........................................................................................1090
14.4.4 Image maps..............................................................................................................................................1091
14.5 Bindings.........................................................................................................................................................................1092
14.5.1 Introduction...............................................................................................................................................1092
14.5.2 Thebuttonelement................................................................................................................................1092
14.5.3 Thedetailsandsummaryelements....................................................................................................1092
14.5.4 Theinputelement as a text entry widget...............................................................................................1092
14.5.5 Theinputelement as domain-specific widgets......................................................................................1093
14.5.6 Theinputelement as a range control....................................................................................................1094
14.5.7 Theinputelement as a colour well........................................................................................................1094
14.5.8 Theinputelement as a checkbox and radio button widgets.................................................................1094
14.5.9 Theinputelement as a file upload control.............................................................................................1094
14.5.10 Theinputelement as a button.............................................................................................................1095
14.5.11 Themarqueeelement...........................................................................................................................1095
14.5.12 Themeterelement................................................................................................................................1096
14.5.13 Theprogresselement.........................................................................................................................1097
14.5.14 Theselectelement..............................................................................................................................1097
14.5.15 Thetextareaelement.........................................................................................................................1098
14.5.16 Thekeygenelement..............................................................................................................................1098
14.6 Frames and framesets..................................................................................................................................................1098
14.7 Interactive media...........................................................................................................................................................1101
14.7.1 Links, forms, and navigation.....................................................................................................................1101
14.7.2 Thetitleattribute.................................................................................................................................1101
14.7.3 Editing hosts.............................................................................................................................................1101
14.7.4 Text rendered in native user interfaces....................................................................................................1102
14.8 Print media....................................................................................................................................................................1103
14.9 Unstyled XML documents.............................................................................................................................................1103
15 Obsolete features...............................................................................................................................................................................1105
15.1 Obsolete but conforming features.................................................................................................................................1105
15.1.1 Warnings for obsolete but conforming features........................................................................................1105
15.2 Non-conforming features...............................................................................................................................................1106
22
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
SaveFile(String filePath): Save PDF document file to a specified path form (Here, we take a blank form as an open a file dialog and load your PDF document in
make pdf form editable in reader; vb extract data from pdf
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word is used to illustrate how to save a sample RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub New
can reader edit pdf forms; extracting data from pdf files
15.3 Requirements for implementations................................................................................................................................1111
15.3.1 Theappletelement................................................................................................................................1111
15.3.2 Themarqueeelement.............................................................................................................................1112
15.3.3 Frames.....................................................................................................................................................1114
15.3.4 Other elements, attributes and APIs........................................................................................................1116
16 IANA considerations...........................................................................................................................................................................1126
16.1text/html...................................................................................................................................................................1126
16.2multipart/x-mixed-replace.................................................................................................................................1127
16.3application/xhtml+xml.........................................................................................................................................1128
16.4text/cache-manifest.............................................................................................................................................1129
16.5text/ping...................................................................................................................................................................1130
16.6application/microdata+json..............................................................................................................................1131
16.7 `Ping-From`.................................................................................................................................................................1132
16.8 `Ping-To`.....................................................................................................................................................................1132
16.9web+scheme prefix......................................................................................................................................................1133
Index........................................................................................................................................................................................................1134
Elements................................................................................................................................................................................1134
Element content categories...................................................................................................................................................1141
Attributes...............................................................................................................................................................................1142
Element Interfaces.................................................................................................................................................................1149
All Interfaces..........................................................................................................................................................................1151
Events....................................................................................................................................................................................1154
MIME Types..........................................................................................................................................................................1155
References..............................................................................................................................................................................................1158
Acknowledgements.................................................................................................................................................................................1166
23
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
how to save a pdf form in reader; sign pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
java read pdf form fields; extract pdf data into excel
1 Introduction
1.1 Where does this specification fit?
This specification defines a big part of the Web platform, in lots of detail. Its place in the Web platform specification stack relative to other
specifications can be best summed up as follows:
CSS 
SVG 
MathML 
NPAPI
Geo
Fetch
CSP
JPEG
GIF
PNG
THIS SPECIFICATION
HTTP  TLS  MQ  DOM  Unicode  WebIDL
MIME  URL  XML  JavaScript  Encodings
1.2 Is this HTML5?
This section is non-normative.
In short: Yes.
In more length: The term "HTML5" is widely used as a buzzword to refer to modern Web technologies, many of which (though by no means all) are
developed at the WHATWG. This document is one such; others are available fromthe WHATWG specification index
.
1.3 Background
This section is non-normative.
HTML is the World Wide Web's core markup language. Originally, HTML was primarily designed as a language for semantically describing scientific
documents. Its general design, however, has enabled it to be adapted, over the subsequent years, to describe a number of other types of
documents and even applications.
Although we have asked them to stop doing so, the W3C also republishes some parts of this specification as separate documents.
Note
Spec bugs:23036
24
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a widely-used form of file
flatten pdf form in reader; extracting data from pdf forms to excel
C# Image: Save or Print Document and Image in Web Viewer
or image, you can easily save the changes to DLL Library, including documents TIFF, PDF, Excel, Word string fileName = Request.Form["saveFileName"]; string fid
extract data from pdf to excel online; how to extract data from pdf to excel
1.4 Audience
This section is non-normative.
This specification is intended for authors of documents and scripts that use the features defined in this specification, implementors of tools that
operate on pages that use the features defined in this specification, and individuals wishing to establish the correctness of documents or
implementations with respect to the requirements of this specification.
This document is probably not suited to readers who do not already have at least a passing familiarity with Web technologies, as in places it
sacrifices clarity for precision, and brevity for completeness. More approachable tutorials and authoring guides can provide a gentler introduction to
the topic.
In particular, familiarity with the basics of DOM is necessary for a complete understanding of some of the more technical parts of this specification.
An understanding of Web IDL, HTTP, XML, Unicode, character encodings, JavaScript, and CSS will also be helpful in places but is not essential.
1.5 Scope
This section is non-normative.
This specification is limited to providing a semantic-level markup language and associated semantic-level scripting APIs for authoring accessible
pages on the Web ranging from static documents to dynamic applications.
The scope of this specification does not include providing mechanisms for media-specific customization of presentation (although default rendering
rules for Web browsers are included at the end of this specification, and several mechanisms for hooking into CSS are provided as part of the
language).
The scope of this specification is not to describe an entire operating system. In particular, hardware configuration software, image manipulation
tools, and applications that users would be expected to use with high-end workstations on a daily basis are out of scope. In terms of applications,
this specification is targeted specifically at applications that would be expected to be used by users on an occasional basis, or regularly but from
disparate locations, with low CPU requirements. Examples of such applications include online purchasing systems, searching systems, games
(especially multiplayer online games), public telephone books or address books, communications software (e-mail clients, instant messaging
clients, discussion software), document editing software, etc.
1.6 History
This section is non-normative.
For its first five years (1990-1995), HTML went through a number of revisions and experienced a number of extensions, primarily hosted first at
CERN, and then at the IETF.
With the creation of the W3C, HTML's development changed venue again. A first abortive attempt at extending HTML in 1995 known as HTML 3.0
then made way to a more pragmatic approach known as HTML 3.2, which was completed in 1997. HTML4 quickly followed later that same year.
The following year, the W3C membership decided to stop evolving HTML and instead begin work on an XML-based equivalent, called XHTML. This
effort started with a reformulation of HTML4 in XML, known as XHTML 1.0, which added no new features except the new serialisation, and which
was completed in 2000. After XHTML 1.0, the W3C's focus turned to making it easier for other working groups to extend XHTML, under the banner
of XHTML Modularization. In parallel with this, the W3C also worked on a new language that was not compatible with the earlier HTML and XHTML
languages, calling it XHTML2.
Around the time that HTML's evolution was stopped in 1998, parts of the API for HTML developed by browser vendors were specified and published
under the name DOM Level 1 (in 1998) and DOM Level 2 Core and DOM Level 2 HTML (starting in 2000 and culminating in 2003). These efforts
then petered out, with some DOM Level 3 specifications published in 2004 but the working group being closed before all the Level 3 drafts were
completed.
In 2003, the publication of XForms, a technology which was positioned as the next generation of Web forms, sparked a renewed interest in evolving
HTML itself, rather than finding replacements for it. This interest was borne from the realization that XML's deployment as a Web technology was
limited to entirely new technologies (like RSS and later Atom), rather than as a replacement for existing deployed technologies (like HTML).
25
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
extract data from pdf file to excel; extract data out of pdf file
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. Description: Convert to PDF and save it into stream. Parameters:
saving pdf forms in acrobat reader; extract data from pdf table
A proof of concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's forms to provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced, without
requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were incompatible with existing HTML Web pages, was the first result of this renewed
interest. At this early stage, while the draft was already publicly available, and input was already being solicited from all sources, the specification
was only under Opera Software's copyright.
The idea that HTML's evolution should be reopened was tested at a W3C workshop in 2004, where some of the principles that underlie the HTML5
work (described below), as well as the aforementioned early draft proposal covering just forms-related features, were presented to the W3C jointly
by Mozilla and Opera. The proposal was rejected on the grounds that the proposal conflicted with the previously chosen direction for the Web's
evolution; the W3C staff and membership voted to continue developing XML-based replacements instead.
Shortly thereafter, Apple, Mozilla, and Opera jointly announced their intent to continue working on the effort under the umbrella of a new venue
called the WHATWG. A public mailing list was created, and the draft was moved to the WHATWG site. The copyright was subsequently amended
to be jointly owned by all three vendors, and to allow reuse of the specification.
The WHATWG was based on several core principles, in particular that technologies need to be backwards compatible, that specifications and
implementations need to match even if this means changing the specification rather than the implementations, and that specifications need to be
detailed enough that implementations can achieve complete interoperability without reverse-engineering each other.
The latter requirement in particular required that the scope of the HTML5 specification include what had previously been specified in three separate
documents: HTML4, XHTML1, and DOM2 HTML. It also meant including significantly more detail than had previously been considered the norm.
In 2006, the W3C indicated an interest to participate in the development of HTML5 after all, and in 2007 formed a working group chartered to work
with the WHATWG on the development of the HTML5 specification. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish the specification under
the W3C copyright, while keeping a version with the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.
For a number of years, both groups then worked together. In 2011, however, the groups came to the conclusion that they had different goals: the
W3C wanted to publish a "finished" version of "HTML5", while the WHATWG wanted to continue working on a Living Standard for HTML,
continuously maintaining the specification rather than freezing it in a state with known problems, and adding new features as needed to evolve the
platform.
Since then, the WHATWG has been working on this specification (amongst others), and the W3C has been copying fixes made by the WHATWG
into their fork of the document (which also has other changes).
1.7 Design notes
This section is non-normative.
It must be admitted that many aspects of HTML appear at first glance to be nonsensical and inconsistent.
HTML, its supporting DOM APIs, as well as many of its supporting technologies, have been developed over a period of several decades by a wide
array of people with different priorities who, in many cases, did not know of each other's existence.
Features have thus arisen from many sources, and have not always been designed in especially consistent ways. Furthermore, because of the
unique characteristics of the Web, implementation bugs have often become de-facto, and now de-jure, standards, as content is often unintentionally
written in ways that rely on them before they can be fixed.
Despite all this, efforts have been made to adhere to certain design goals. These are described in the next few subsections.
This section is non-normative.
To avoid exposing Web authors to the complexities of multithreading, the HTML and DOM APIs are designed such that no script can ever detect
the simultaneous execution of other scripts. Even withworkersp938
, the intent is that the behaviour of implementations can be thought of as
completely serialising the execution of all scripts in allbrowsing contextsp748
.
1.7.1 Serialisability of script execution
26
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
how to fill out pdf forms in reader; save data in pdf form reader
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk. Parameters: Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into stream. Parameters:
extract pdf form data to excel; extract data from pdf into excel
This section is non-normative.
This specification interacts with and relies on a wide variety of other specifications. In certain circumstances, unfortunately, conflicting needs have
led to this specification violating the requirements of these other specifications. Whenever this has occurred, the transgressions have each been
noted as a "willful violation", and the reason for the violation has been noted.
This section is non-normative.
HTML has a wide array of extensibility mechanisms that can be used for adding semantics in a safe manner:
• Authors can use theclassp122
attribute to extend elements, effectively creating their own elements, while using the most applicable
existing "real" HTML element, so that browsers and other tools that don't know of the extension can still support it somewhat well. This is
the tack used by microformats, for example.
• Authors can include data for inline client-side scripts or server-side site-wide scripts to process using thedata-*=""p130
attributes.
These are guaranteed to never be touched by browsers, and allow scripts to include data on HTML elements that scripts can then look
for and process.
• Authors can use the<meta name="" content="">p143
mechanism to include page-wide metadata by registeringextensions to the
predefined set of metadata namesp147
.
• Authors can use therel=""p245
mechanism to annotate links with specific meanings by registeringextensions to the predefined set of
link typesp265
. This is also used by microformats.
• Authors can embed raw data using the<script type="">p564
mechanism with a custom type, for further handling by inline or server-
side scripts.
• Authors can createpluginsp44
and invoke them using theembedp315
element. This is how Flash works.
• Authors can extend APIs using the JavaScript prototyping mechanism. This is widely used by script libraries, for instance.
• Authors can use the microdata feature (theitemscope=""p677
anditemprop=""p679
attributes) to embed nested name-value pairs of
data to be shared with other applications and sites.
1.8 HTML vs XHTML
This section is non-normative.
This specification defines an abstract language for describing documents and applications, and some APIs for interacting with in-memory
representations of resources that use this language.
The in-memory representation is known as "DOM HTML", or "the DOM" for short.
There are various concrete syntaxes that can be used to transmit resources that use this abstract language, two of which are defined in this
specification.
The first such concrete syntax is the HTML syntax. This is the format suggested for most authors. It is compatible with most legacy Web browsers.
If a document is transmitted with thetext/htmlp1126
MIME typep43
, then it will be processed as an HTML document by Web browsers. This
specification defines the latest HTML syntax, known simply as "HTML".
The second concrete syntax is the XHTML syntax, which is an application of XML. When a document is transmitted with anXML MIME typep43
,
such asapplication/xhtml+xmlp1128
, then it is treated as an XML document by Web browsers, to be parsed by an XML processor. Authors are
reminded that the processing for XML and HTML differs; in particular, even minor syntax errors will prevent a document labeled as XML from being
rendered fully, whereas they would be ignored in the HTML syntax. This specification defines the latest XHTML syntax, known simply as "XHTML".
1.7.2 Compliance with other specifications
1.7.3 Extensibility
27
The DOM, the HTML syntax, and the XHTML syntax cannot all represent the same content. For example, namespaces cannot be represented
using the HTML syntax, but they are supported in the DOM and in the XHTML syntax. Similarly, documents that use thenoscriptp577
feature can
be represented using the HTML syntax, but cannot be represented with the DOM or in the XHTML syntax. Comments that contain the string "-->"
can only be represented in the DOM, not in the HTML and XHTML syntaxes.
1.9 Structure of this specification
This section is non-normative.
This specification is divided into the following major sections:
Introductionp24
Non-normative materials providing a context for the HTML standard.
Common infrastructurep42
The conformance classes, algorithms, definitions, and the common underpinnings of the rest of the specification.
Semantics, structure, and APIs of HTML documentsp103
Documents are built from elements. These elements form a tree using the DOM. This section defines the features of this DOM, as well as
introducing the features common to all elements, and the concepts used in defining elements.
The elements of HTMLp134
Each element has a predefined meaning, which is explained in this section. Rules for authors on how to use the element, along with user
agent requirements for how to handle each element, are also given. This includes large signature features of HTML such as video playback
and subtitles, form controls and form submission, and a 2D graphics API known as the HTML canvas.
Microdatap672
This specification introduces a mechanism for adding machine-readable annotations to documents, so that tools can extract trees of name-
value pairs from the document. This section describes this mechanism and some algorithms that can be used to convert HTML documents
into other formats. This section also defines some sample Microdata vocabularies for contact information, calendar events, and licensing
works.
User interactionp708
HTML documents can provide a number of mechanisms for users to interact with and modify content, which are described in this section,
such as how focus works, and drag-and-drop.
Loading Web pagesp748
HTML documents do not exist in a vacuum — this section defines many of the features that affect environments that deal with multiple pages,
such as Web browsers and offline caching of Web applications.
Web application APIsp827
This section introduces basic features for scripting of applications in HTML.
Web workersp916
This section defines an API for background threads in JavaScript.
The communication APIsp887
This section describes some mechanisms that applications written in HTML can use to communicate with other applications from different
domains running on the same client. It also introduces a server-push event stream mechanism known as Server Sent Events or
EventSourcep889
, and a two-way full-duplex socket protocol for scripts known as Web Sockets.
Web storagep944
This section defines a client-side storage mechanism based on name-value pairs.
The HTML syntaxp951
The XHTML syntaxp1063
All of these features would be for naught if they couldn't be represented in a serialised form and sent to other people, and so these sections
define the syntaxes of HTML and XHTML, along with rules for how to parse content using those syntaxes.
Renderingp1067
This section defines the default rendering rules for Web browsers.
28
There are also some appendices, listingobsolete featuresp1105
andIANA considerationsp1126
, and several indices.
This specification should be read like all other specifications. First, it should be read cover-to-cover, multiple times. Then, it should be read
backwards at least once. Then it should be read by picking random sections from the contents list and following all the cross-references.
As described in the conformance requirements section below, this specification describes conformance criteria for a variety of conformance classes.
In particular, there are conformance requirements that apply toproducers, for example authors and the documents they create, and there are
conformance requirements that apply toconsumers, for example Web browsers. They can be distinguished by what they are requiring: a
requirement on a producer states what is allowed, while a requirement on a consumer states how software is to act.
Requirements on producers have no bearing whatsoever on consumers.
This is a definition, requirement, or explanation.
This is an open issue.
interface Example {
// this is an IDL definition
};
/* this is a CSS fragment */
The defining instance of a term is marked up likethis. Uses of that term are marked up likethisp29
or likethisp29
.
The defining instance of an element, attribute, or API is marked up likethis. References to that element, attribute, or API are marked up like
thisp29
.
For example, "thefooattribute's value must be avalid integerp66
" is a requirement on producers, as it lays out the allowed values; in
contrast, the requirement "thefooattribute's value must be parsed using therules for parsing integersp66
" is a requirement on
consumers, as it describes how to process the content.
Example
Continuing the above example, a requirement stating that a particular attribute's value is constrained to being avalid integerp66
emphatically doesnotimply anything about the requirements on consumers. It might be that the consumers are in fact required to treat
the attribute as an opaque string, completely unaffected by whether the value conforms to the requirements or not. It might be (as in the
previous example) that the consumers are required to parse the value using specific rules that define how invalid (non-numeric in this
case) values are to be processed.
Example
This is a note.
Note
This is an example.
Example
This is a warning.
⚠Warning!
variable=object.methodp29( [optionalArgument] )
This is a note to authors describing the usage of an interface.
Note
IDL
CSS
1.9.1 How to read this specification
1.9.2 Typographic conventions
29
Other code fragments are marked uplike this.
Byte sequences with bytes in the range 0x00 to 0x7F, inclusive, are marked up like `this`.
Variables are marked up likethis.
In an algorithm, steps insynchronous sectionsp845
are marked with ⌛.
In some cases, requirements are given in the form of lists with conditions and corresponding requirements. In such cases, the requirements that
apply to a condition are always the first set of requirements that follow the condition, even in the case of there being multiple sets of conditions for
those requirements. Such cases are presented as follows:
This is a condition
This is another condition
This is the requirement that applies to the conditions above.
This is a third condition
This is the requirement that applies to the third condition.
1.10 Privacy concerns
This section is non-normative.
Some features of HTML trade user convenience for a measure of user privacy.
In general, due to the Internet's architecture, a user can be distinguished from another by the user's IP address. IP addresses do not perfectly
match to a user; as a user moves from device to device, or from network to network, their IP address will change; similarly, NAT routing, proxy
servers, and shared computers enable packets that appear to all come from a single IP address to actually map to multiple users. Technologies
such as onion routing can be used to further anonymise requests so that requests from a single user at one node on the Internet appear to come
from many disparate parts of the network.
However, the IP address used for a user's requests is not the only mechanism by which a user's requests could be related to each other. Cookies,
for example, are designed specifically to enable this, and are the basis of most of the Web's session features that enable you to log into a site with
which you have an account.
There are other mechanisms that are more subtle. Certain characteristics of a user's system can be used to distinguish groups of users from each
other; by collecting enough such information, an individual user's browser's "digital fingerprint" can be computed, which can be as good, if not
better, as an IP address in ascertaining which requests are from the same user.
Grouping requests in this manner, especially across multiple sites, can be used for both benign (and even arguably positive) purposes, as well as
for malevolent purposes. An example of a reasonably benign purpose would be determining whether a particular person seems to prefer sites with
dog illustrations as opposed to sites with cat illustrations (based on how often they visit the sites in question) and then automatically using the
preferred illustrations on subsequent visits to participating sites. Malevolent purposes, however, could include governments combining information
such as the person's home address (determined from the addresses they use when getting driving directions on one site) with their apparent
political affiliations (determined by examining the forum sites that they participate in) to determine whether the person should be prevented from
voting in an election.
Since the malevolent purposes can be remarkably evil, user agent implementors are encouraged to consider how to provide their users with tools to
minimise leaking information that could be used to fingerprint a user.
Unfortunately, as the first paragraph in this section implies, sometimes there is great benefit to be derived from exposing the very information that
can also be used for fingerprinting purposes, so it's not as easy as simply blocking all possible leaks. For instance, the ability to log into a site to
post under a specific identity requires that the user's requests be identifiable as all being from the same user, more or less by definition. More
subtly, though, information such as how wide text is, which is necessary for many effects that involve drawing text onto a canvas (e.g. any effect
that involves drawing a border around the text) also leaks information that can be used to group a user's requests. (In this case, by potentially
exposing, via a brute force search, which fonts a user has installed, information which can vary considerably from user to user.)
Features in this specification which can beused to fingerprint the userare marked as this paragraph is.
Other features in the platform can be used for the same purpose, though, including, though not limited to:
p30
30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested