c# convert pdf to image free library : Extracting data from pdf to excel software control dll windows azure asp.net web forms fcns14-part217

MicroStrategy Functions Reference
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy   
1
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Function syntax and formula components   
7
differ in that, for a transformation, the single-value function must be applied 
before a group-value function, while in a compound metric the single-value 
function is applied after the group-value function. 
Example 1: Transformed fact
Avg(Abs([Account Transactions]))
Suppose Account Transactions is a list of the following values: -300.5, -7.7, 
900, -80, and 2.2. The single-value function, Absolute, is applied to the list. 
The result set is the absolute value of each element in the list: 300.5, 7.7, 
900, 80, 2.2. It is important to note that the single-value function returns 
five elements of output for five elements of input. Once the single-value 
function has been applied, the group-value function, Avg, is applied to 
produce an average of those values, 258.08. For more information on the 
Abs and Avg functions, see Abs (absolute value), page 314 and Avg 
(average), page 94.
Example 2: Compound metric
Avg(Revenue){Quarter} - Avg(Cost){Quarter}
In this example, the group-value function Avg is applied to both the Revenue 
and Cost facts in your data warehouse. First, Microstrategy uses the list of 
values for the two input variables Revenue and Cost to generate, using the 
Avg function twice, two new variables each containing a single value. The two 
resulting variables are stored as intermediate results. Next, the single-value 
function “-” (subtraction) is applied by Microstrategy to subtract one 
intermediate result from the other, resulting in a single value for the metric. 
For more information on the Abs and Avg functions, see Abs (absolute 
value), page 314 and Avg (average), page 94.
In both of the previous examples, both single-value and group-value 
functions were used. The next section addresses group-value functions in 
more detail.
Extracting data from pdf to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract pdf data to excel; extracting data from pdf into excel
Extracting data from pdf to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf form; extracting data from pdf forms to excel
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
1
8
Function syntax and formula components
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Group-value functions
A group-value function takes one or more lists of values as input and returns 
a single output value for each list. The existence of a GROUP BY clause in a 
SQL statement indicates that you are using a group-value function.
The most common group-value functions include Avg, Count, Max, Median, 
Min, Stdev, Sum, Var, ApplyAgg, and so on. First, Last, IRR, and NPV 
functions also belong to this category, but they have an additional sort by 
feature (for more information, see Parameters, page 18). Sort by specifies 
the order that the values returned by an expression will appear on a report. 
(For more information on the Sort By parameter, see BreakBy and SortBy 
parameters, page 19.)
Group-value functions can be used to create simple metrics, nested metrics, 
and compound metrics, as well as in the calculation of subtotals. The 
following examples illustrate their use.
Example 1: Average
Avg([Employee Age])
In this example, the group-value function Avg operates on the argument 
Employee Age, which is a list of the following elements: 27, 35, 32, 47, 43, 40, 
30. The function reduces the seven elements of the input value to a single 
output value of 36. For more information on the Avg function, see Avg 
(average), page 94.
Example 2: Median
Median([Employee Age])
The only difference between Example 2 and Example 1 above is the fact that 
the group-value function, Median, is used, instead of Avg. Again, the 
function reduces the seven elements of the input value to a single output 
value of 35. For more information, see Median, page 105
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
pdf form field recognition; extract data from pdf to excel online
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# programming sample for extracting all images from PDF. // Open a document. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page.
how to extract data from pdf to excel; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy   
1
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Function syntax and formula components   
9
OLAP (Relative) functions
Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) functions are also referred to as 
Relative functions because each element in a list of values is related to and 
dependent on one or more other elements in the list, and the positions of the 
elements within the list determine how computation is performed.
An OLAP function takes multiple elements from a list and returns a new list 
of elements. Unlike group-value functions, though, the number of elements 
in the input list and the number of elements in the output list remains the 
same. Unlike single-value functions, the computation depends upon the 
conditions set by the BreakBy parameter that defines when the calculation 
restarts and the SortBy parameter that defines how the list of values is sorted 
(see Parameters, page 18). 
OLAP functions include Rank, all the functions with Moving as the prefix of 
the name (for example, MovingDifference, MovingMin, MovingStdev, and so 
on), all the functions with Running as the prefix (for example, RunningAvg, 
RunningCount, RunningSum, and so on), and all the NTile functions (such 
as NTile, NTileSize, NTileValue, and NTileValueSize). ApplyOLAP also 
belongs to the OLAP category.
OLAP functions are only used in the creation of metrics. The following is an 
example.
Example: RunningSum
RunningSum <BreakBy={[Customer Region]}, SortBy= 
([Customer State]) >(Revenue)
BreakBy refers to the attribute or hierarchy where calculations for an OLAP 
function restart. To break by an attribute or hierarchy means to restart 
calculations that use OLAP, or Relative, functions when the analytical engine 
reaches the next instance of the specified attribute or hierarchy. Examples of 
OLAP functions include RunningStdevP, Rank, NTile, and various 
expressions that calculate percent values. To break by an attribute or 
hierarchy in an expression, you set the BreakBy parameter.
The RunningSum metric computes the sum of the revenue for each 
Customer Region by adding the revenue for each Customer State to the 
revenue of the Customer States in the rows above it and displaying the 
incremented total. The BreakBy Customer Region condition causes 
calculations to begins again, however, when the next Customer Region is 
encountered. (Notice in the figure below that the Total Revenue and the 
Running Sum for Arizona are equal because the calculation for RunningSum 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide. Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc. Free PDF document
how to fill in a pdf form in reader; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
collect data from pdf forms; c# read pdf form fields
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
1
10
Function syntax and formula components
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
has restarted, since Arizona is categorized in Southwest, a different 
Customer Region than Wyoming, the previous Customer State on the 
report.) Because of the SortBy Customer State condition, the Customer 
States are listed in ascending (alphabetical) order, as shown in the report 
excerpt below.
Comparison functions
Comparison functions allow you to compare values. Using these functions, 
you can compare single values or lists of values, or compare a list to a 
threshold value. 
Comparison operators include < (less than), > (greater than), = (is equal to), 
Between, Contains, Ends with, ApplyComparision, and so on. They are only 
used to create filters, which limit report data to a subset based on your need. 
Example: > (Greater than)
Revenue > “500000”
In this example, the filter limits the states in your yearly income report to 
those with accrued revenue greater than $500,000. 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Sample for extracting all images from PDF in VB.NET program. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
extract data from pdf form fields; export excel to pdf form
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
cannot save pdf form in reader; vb extract data from pdf
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy   
1
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Function syntax and formula components   
11
Logical functions
Logical functions provide basic comparisons and return TRUE or FALSE 
values based on the evaluation of the formula. For numeric values, 0 is 
treated as FALSE, and 1 is treated as TRUE. These functions provide a means 
to combine data evaluations and comparison operators into complex 
expressions. These expressions, in turn, can answer questions such as 
“Which of our regions produced revenue that exceeded a ‘success’ 
threshold?”
Logical operators include And, Or, Not, and ApplyLogic, all of which can only 
be used to build filters where criteria are provided for the inclusion and 
exclusion of data from a report display or metric calculation. 
Example: And
((Revenue - Cost) > 50000) And [Sell-through Percentage] 
> 25
Built for the attribute State, this filter limits report data to those states where 
Profit (defined as Revenue - Cost) is greater than $50,000 and the 
Sell-through Percentage is greater than 25%.
Apply (Pass-through) functions
The terms Apply functions and Pass-through functions are interchangeable. 
They both denote functions in Microstrategy that provide access to functions 
or syntactic constructs that are not standard in Microstrategy but are 
provided by various Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) 
platforms. The name “Pass-through” derives from the fact that Microstrategy 
passes information to a database which then uses its own functions. (Using 
the native functionality of your RDBMS via Pass-through functions requires 
that you know the syntax of your particular RDBMS. That syntax is beyond 
the scope of this book and will vary from RDBMS to RDBMS.) RDBMS 
functions, while necessary, must be used with care, since they always bypass 
Microstrategy’s parsers and validators. 
There are five predefined Apply functions that can be used to replace regular 
or predefined functions of the same type. The functions are as follows:
• ApplySimple: These functions are used where simple (e.g., arithmetic) 
operators can be used. 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
extract data from pdf form to excel; fill in pdf form reader
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
functions to PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF, extracting text from PDF, and so on
pdf form save in reader; extracting data from pdf to excel
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
1
12
Function syntax and formula components
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
• ApplyAgg: These functions are used where aggregate functions (e.g., 
Sum) can be used. 
• ApplyRelative: These functions are used where Online Analytical 
Processing (OLAP) functions (e.g., Rank) can be used. 
• ApplyComparison: These functions are used where comparison operators 
(e.g., >, =, Like and In) can be used. 
• ApplyLogic: These functions are used where logical operators (e.g., AND, 
OR, and NOT) can be used. 
With Apply functions, project designers can customize expressions in the 
Attribute, Filter and Metric editors to utilize RDBMS functions that are not 
provided by Microstrategy.

MicroStrategy strongly advises against using Apply functions when 
standard Microstrategy functions can be used to achieve the same 
goal, because using RDBMS functions effectively bypasses the 
validations and other benefits of MicroStrategy products. Using Apply 
functions is recommended only when corresponding functionality 
does not exist in the MicroStrategy product. When you need to use an 
Apply function, Microstrategy encourages you to submit an 
enhancement request for inclusion of the desired feature in a future 
product release.
Example: ApplyComparison used to check a prompted date
In this example, a table in your data warehouse contains the columns Item, 
Effec Date, and Term Date (as well as Revenue), as shown below:
Each row in the table corresponds to an item that was on sale during the time 
between Effec Date and Term Date. Your objective is to generate a report 
that lists all items (and an associated metric that you choose) that were on 
Item
Effec Date
Term Date
Revenue
Blouse
06/01/2007
07/30/2007
1000
Jeans
05/30/2007
06/17/2007
500
Gloves
10/01/2007
10/25/2007
150
Leather Shoes
06/15/2007
06/22/2007
750
Winter Hat
11/01/2007
11/08/2007
900
Winter Boots
12/01/2007
12/15/2007
2200
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
NET application. Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF pages in C#.NET console class. Support .NET WinForms
extract data from pdf; exporting pdf form to excel
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy   
1
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Function syntax and formula components   
13
sale on a particular date your user chooses at run time. To generate this 
report, first create a value prompt named Test Date that allows the user to 
input a date. (See Value Prompts in the Advanced Prompts chapter of the 
Microstrategy Advanced Reporting Guide for more information on creating 
date prompts.) Next, using that prompt, create a report filter using the 
Custom expression box located in the Advanced Qualification pane of the 
Filter Editor, as shown below. (See also the Advanced Filters chapter of the 
Microstrategy Advanced Reporting Guide for more information on Custom 
expressions.)
Even though the filter is validated when you click Validate, MicroStrategy 
returns an error when the report is executed. The error results from the fact 
that you are supplying the SQL engine with two attributes and a value 
prompt, while MicroStrategy is expecting to compare an attribute to the 
attributes Effec Date and Term Date. In effect, you have a “type mismatch” 
problem.
In this case, you can use an Apply function. Instead of having MicroStrategy 
test the date value prompt, you instruct your database to perform the test. It 
is important to remember that you have chosen to use an Apply function only 
because MicroStrategy does not have a built-in function to accomplish your 
task. If an appropriate MicroStrategy function existed, you would have used 
it instead of an RDBMS function, because the latter does not offer the 
validating features that MicroStrategy does. (To use Apply functions, you 
must know the syntax of the corresponding function or operation in the 
RDBMS you are using.)
To test the date prompt, use a custom expression to pass three values to the 
database for comparison: the value prompt Test Date, the attribute Effec 
Date, and the attribute Term Date. All three of these values are passed to the 
database using placeholders in the form of #n, where n is a positive integer 
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
1
14
Function syntax and formula components
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
that increases by 1 for each successive item being passed, starting with 0. The 
first value passed is referred to as #0, the second is #1, the third #2, and so 
on. The Custom expression in the Advanced Qualification pane of the Filter 
Editor depicted below shows the syntax needed for this example:
Notice that the syntax is nested. The outer portion of the expression contains 
the Microstrategy function ApplyComparison, as well as the Microstrategy 
prompt Test Date and the attributes Effec Date and Term Date. 
The inner portion of the syntax, which is contained within double quotes, is 
the database operation #0 between #1 and #2. Code that is passed to the 
database using an Apply function is always enclosed in quotes, and the 
arguments that are passed with that code are written as placeholders in the 
form of #n, with the specific forms of the passed attributes specified by the 
characters after the “@” sign. In this example, [Effec Date]@ID specifies 
that Microstrategy pass the ID form of the Effec Attribute instead of the 
DESC or any other form that may exist in the database. At run time, #0, #1, 
and #2 are replaced by Test Date, Effec Date, and Term Date, respectively, so 
that the database effectively receives the following syntax:
Test Date between Effec Date and TermDate
If the user chooses 06/16/07 as the value of Test Date at run time, the 
RDBMS reads the table row by row to see if the date falls between Effec Date 
and Term Date. Whenever 06/16/07 falls between Effec Date and Term Date 
on a particular row, the item on that row is returned in the result set. In this 
example, Blouse, Jeans, and Leather Shoes are returned. (You can verify this 
result by looking at the data warehouse table shown in the beginning of this 
section.) If your report is set up with Item as a row attribute, those three 
items appear on your report, indicating that they (and only they) were on 
sale on 06/16/07.
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy   
1
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
Function syntax and formula components   
15
For additional information about Apply functions, see Apply (Pass-Through) 
functions, page 132. The syntax of each Apply function as well as examples 
appear in the sections that immediately follow.
Example: Test whether Hire Date is in the current year
Your HR department requires a list of employees that have been hired during 
the current calendar year. The following custom expression uses the 
ApplySimple function to test whether the year of Hire Date is the same as the 
current year:
ApplySimple ( "datepart(yy, #0)", [Hire Date]@ID) = 
ApplySimple ( "datepart(yy, getdate())", [Hire 
Date]@ID)
Each piece of the custom expression is explained below. More detailed 
information on Apply functions in general can be found in Apply 
(Pass-through) functions, page 11. More information on ApplySimple 
functions, specifically, is found in ApplySimple, page 135.
• The datepart function extracts a specified part of a given date. The first 
datepart function extracts the year (as directed by yy) from the ID 
attribute form of the Hire Date attribute. The ID attribute form—as 
opposed to the DESC or any other attribute form—is specified by @ID.
• The placeholder, #0, stands for the argument [Hire Date]@ID that is 
passed to your RDBMS. (Apply functions use your database’s 
computational capabilities instead of those of MicroStrategy.)
• The second datepart function extracts the year (as instructed by yy) 
from the current, or system, date. The system date is obtained via the 
RDBMS function getdate().
• Your RDBMS extracts the year from both the Hire Date and the system 
date, with MicroStrategy passing information to it. The container that 
hands the necessary function to your RDBMS is an Apply function, 
ApplySimple. In other words, ApplySimple acts as an interface between 
you and the database, and when the RDBMS returns both year values, 
they are compared with the = operator. If the year of a particular Hire 
Date element is the same as the year of the system date, the custom 
expression statement evaluates as true and that Hire Date attribute 
element is returned in the result set of your report. If the year of a 
particular Hire Date element is different than the year of the system date, 
Understanding Functions in MicroStrategy
MicroStrategy Functions Reference
1
16
Function syntax and formula components
© 2011 MicroStrategy, Inc.
the custom expression statement evaluates as false, and that Hire Date 
attribute element is filtered out of the report.
The attribute Hire Date is enclosed in brackets. Any time you type 
an attribute whose name contains one or more spaces, the attribute 
must be enclosed in brackets. (The use of brackets around compound 
object names is standard for many objects in MicroStrategy and is not 
restricted to custom expressions and Apply functions.)
The above example used an Apply function, ApplySimple. The next example 
uses ApplyComparison. 
Example: Customer City = Call Center using ApplyComparison
You need a list of customers who live in the same city as one of your call 
centers. While it is possible to generate this report with a custom expression 
that does not use an Apply function, this example uses an ApplyComparison 
function to demonstrate Apply functionality within the custom expression. 
(For steps to create this report without the use of an Apply function, see the 
Attribute-to-attribute qualifications section of the Advanced Filters chapter 
of the Advanced Reporting Guide.) 
The custom expression used here evaluates whether one attribute is exactly 
the same as another:
ApplyComparison (“#0 like #1”,  
[Customer City]@DESC, [Call Center]@DESC)
Each piece of the custom expression is explained below:
• The ApplyComparison function is used with RDBMS comparison 
operators, such as the like operator used in this example.
• #0 like #1 is the actual comparison, comparing the first argument, #0, 
with the second argument, #1. Remember that this comparison is done 
by your RDBMS—not by MicroStrategy.
• [Customer City]@DESC sets the first argument passed to your 
RDBMS as the description form of the Customer City attribute, while 
[Call Center]@DESC sets the second argument passed to your 
RDBMS as the description form of the Call Center attribute.
The attributes Customer City and Call Center are enclosed in 
brackets. Any time you type an attribute whose name contains one or 
more spaces, the attribute must be enclosed in square brackets. (The 
use of brackets around compound object names is standard for many 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested