pdf to image c# open source : Export excel to pdf form Library control component asp.net web page html mvc fulton_fulton21-part531

var bluepixel = ((pixelX-blueObject.x ) + (pixelY-blueObject.y )
*blueObject.width )*4 + 3 ;
var redpixel = ((pixelX-redObject.x) +
(pixelY-redObject.y)*redObject.width)*4 + 3 ;
if (( blueObject.blueImageData.data [ bluepixel ] !== 0 ) &&
redObject.redImageData.data[ redpixel ] !== 0 )) {
console.log("pixel collision")
blueObject.dx=0;
redObject.dx=0;
break;
}
}
}
}
}
function boundingBoxCollide(object1, object2) {
var left1 = object1.x;
var left2 = object2.x;
var right1 = object1.x + object1.width;
var right2 = object2.x + object2.width;
var top1 = object1.y;
var top2 = object2.y;
var bottom1 = object1.y + object1.height;
var bottom2 = object2.y + object2.height;
if (bottom1 < top2return(false);
if (top1 > bottom2return(false);
if (right1 < left2return(false);
if (left1 > right2) return(false);
return(true);
};
function startUp(){
gameLoop();
}
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop100);
drawScreen();
}
startUp();
Using Pixel Data to Detect Object Collisions  |  189
Export excel to pdf form - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract pdf data into excel; how to extract data from pdf file using java
Export excel to pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
export pdf data to excel; pdf data extraction to excel
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div>
<canvas id="canvas" width="400" height="400"  style="position: absolute; top: 
50px; left: 50px;">
Your browser does not support the HTML 5 Canvas.
</canvas>
</div>
</body>
</html>
What’s Next?
We covered quite a lot in this chapter, evolving from simply loading images to animating
and rotating them. We looked at using tile sheets and tile maps, and then we built some
useful applications with Canvas image functions and capabilities. In the first four chap‐
ters, we’ve covered most of what Canvas offers as a drawing surface. In the next six
chapters, we will cover more advanced topics, such as applying 2D physics to Canvas
objects, integrating the HTML5 <video> and <audio> tags with the <canvas> tag, cre‐
ating games, and looking at some libraries and features that we can use to extend the
functionality of HTML5 Canvas—even creating applications for mobile devices.
190  |  Chapter 4: Images on the Canvas
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF
change font size pdf form reader; extract data from pdf file
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Able to export PDF document to HTML file. for C#.NET supports file conversion between PDF and various and images, like Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, and PPT
pdf form save with reader; how to save a pdf form in reader
CHAPTER 5
Math, Physics, and Animation
Impressing users with animation involves more than knowing how to move objects—
you also need to know how to move them in ways that users expect. That requires
understanding some common algorithms for math-based movement and physics in‐
teractions. Simple movement based on points and vectors provides a foundation, and
then it’s time to create objects that bounce off walls and one another with a bit of friction
added to the mix. After that, we will step back and talk about movement that goes beyond
straight lines: circles, spirals, and complex Bezier curves. We will then cover how adding
gravity can affect movement. Finally, we will finish this chapter by discussing easing
and how it can have a positive effect on math-based animations.
Moving in a Straight Line
The simplest kinds of animations—moving objects in a straight line up and down the
canvas—can take the form of adding a constant value to the x or y position of an object
every time it is drawn.
So, to animate graphics, we will need to create an interval and then call a function that
will display our updated graphics on every frame. Each example in this chapter will be
built in a similar way. The first step is to set up the necessary variables in our canva
sApp() function. For this first, basic example of movement, we will create a variable
named speed. We will apply this value to the y position of our object on every call to
drawScreen(). The x and y variables set up the initial position of the object (a filled
circle) that we will move down the canvas:
var speed = 5;
var y = 10;
var x = 250;
191
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image
sign pdf form reader; extract data from pdf form fields
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image
extract pdf form data to excel; extract data from pdf table
After we create the variables, we set up an interval to call the drawScreen() function
every 20 milliseconds. This is the loop we need to update our objects and move them
around the canvas:
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop20);
drawScreen()
}
gameLoop();
In the drawScreen() function, we update the value of y by adding to it the value of the
speed variable:
y += speed;
Finally, we draw our circle on the canvas. We position it using the current values of x
and y. Because y is updated every time the function is called, the circle effectively moves
down the canvas:
context.fillStyle = "#000000";
context.beginPath();
context.arc(x,y,15,0,Math.PI*2,true);
context.closePath();
context.fill();
To move the circle up the screen, we would make speed a negative number. To move it
left or right, we would update the x instead of the y variable. To move the circle diago‐
nally, we would update both x and y at the same time.
Example 5-1 shows the complete code needed to create basic movement in a straight
line.
Example 5-1. Moving in a straight line
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>CH5EX1: Moving In A Straight Line</title>
<script src="modernizr.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
window.addEventListener('load'eventWindowLoadedfalse);
function eventWindowLoaded() {
canvasApp();
}
function canvasSupport () {
return Modernizr.canvas;
}
function canvasApp() {
192  |  Chapter 5: Math, Physics, and Animation
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. for converting MicroSoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint document to PDF file in VB
export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet; make pdf form editable in reader
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email.
extract table data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf
if (!canvasSupport()) {
return;
}
function  drawScreen () {
context.fillStyle = '#EEEEEE';
context.fillRect(00theCanvas.width, theCanvas.height);
//Box
context.strokeStyle = '#000000';
context.strokeRect(1 1theCanvas.width-2, theCanvas.height-2);
// Create ball
y += speed;
context.fillStyle = "#000000";
context.beginPath();
context.arc(x,y,15,0,Math.PI*2,true);
context.closePath();
context.fill();
}
theCanvas = document.getElementById("canvasOne");
context = theCanvas.getContext("2d");
var speed = 5;
var y = 10;
var x = 250;
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop20);
drawScreen()
}
gameLoop();
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div style="position: absolute; top: 50px; left: 50px;">
<canvas id="canvasOne" width="500" height="500">
Your browser does not support HTML5 Canvas.
</canvas>
</div>
Moving in a Straight Line  |  193
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page
extract data from pdf form; edit pdf form in reader
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page
exporting pdf data to excel; how to extract data from pdf to excel
</body>
</html>
The basic structure of the HTML for all the examples in this chapter
will follow these rules. In the interest of saving space, we will refrain
from discussing this code further, but it will appear in the examples
provided.
Moving Between Two Points: The Distance of a Line
Movement based on constant changes to the x or y position of an object works well for
some applications, but at other times you will need to be more precise. One such instance
is when you need to move an object from point A to point B at a constant rate of speed.
In mathematics, a common way to find the length of an unknown oline is to use the
Pythagorean theorem:
A
2
+ B
2
= C
2
In this equation, C is the unknown side of a triangle when A and B are already known.
However, we need to translate this equation into something that we can use with the
points and pixels we have available on the canvas.
This is a good example of using a mathematical equation in your application. In this
case, we want to find the distance of a line, given two points. In English, this equation
reads like this:
The distance equals the square root of the square of the difference between the x value
of the second point minus the x value of the first point, plus the square of the difference
between the y value of the second point minus the y value of the first point.
You can see this in Figure 5-1. It’s much easier to understand in this format.
Figure 5-1. Distance equation
In the second example, we need to create some new variables in the canvasApp()
function. We will still use a speed variable, just like in the first example, but this time
we set it to 5, which means it will move 5 pixels on every call to drawScreen():
var speed = 5;
194  |  Chapter 5: Math, Physics, and Animation
We then create a couple of dynamic objects—each with an x and a y property—that will
represent the two points we want to move between. For this example, we will move our
circle from 20,250 to 480,250:
var p1 = {x:20,y:250};
var p2 = {x:480,y:250};
Now it is time to re-create the distance equation in Figure 5-1. The first step is to calculate
the differences between the second and first x and y points:
var dx = p2.x - p1.x;
var dy = p2.y - p1.y;
To determine the distance value, we square both the values we just created, add them,
and then use the Math.sqrt()function to get the square root of the number:
var distance = Math.sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy);
Next, we need to use that calculated distance value in a way that will allow us to move
an object a uniform number of pixels from p1 to p2. The first thing we do is calculate
how many moves (calls to drawScreen()) it will take the object to move at the given
value of speed. We get this by dividing the distance by the speed:
var moves = distance/speed;
Then we find the distance to move both x and y on each call to drawScreen(). We name
these variables xunits and yunits:
var xunits = (p2.x - p1.x)/moves;
var yunits = (p2.y - p1.y)/moves;
Finally, we create a dynamic object named ball that holds the x and y value of p1:
var ball = {x:p1.xy:p1.y};
And create the interval to call drawScreen() every 33 milliseconds:
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop20);
drawScreen()
}
gameLoop();
Drawing the ball
Let’s draw the ball on the screen. In the drawScreen() function, we first check to see
whether the moves variable is greater than zero. If so, we are still supposed to move the
ball across the screen because we have not yet reached p2. We decrement moves
(moves--) and then update the x and y properties of the ball object by adding the xunits
to x and yunits to y:
if (moves > 0 ) {
moves--;
Moving in a Straight Line  |  195
ball.x += xunits;
ball.y += yunits;
}
Now that our values have been updated, we simply draw the ball at the x and y coordi‐
nates specified by the x and y properties, and we are done—that is, until drawScreen()
is called 33 milliseconds later:
context.fillStyle = "#000000";
context.beginPath();
context.arc(ball.x,ball.y,15,0,Math.PI*2,true);
context.closePath();
context.fill();
Let’s try the example by executing it in a web browser. You can find it in the code
distribution as CH5EX2.html, or you can type in Example 5-2. Watch the ball move
from one point to another. If you update the x and y values of each point, or change the
speed, watch the results. You can do a lot with this very simple example.
Tracing movement: A path of points
For many of the examples in this chapter, we will create a way to trace an object’s move‐
ment on the canvas by drawing points to show its path. We have done this to help
illustrate how objects move. However, in the real world, you would need to remove this
functionality so that your application will perform to its potential. This is the only place
we will discuss this code, so if you see it listed in any of the later examples in this chapter,
refer back to this section to refresh your memory on its functionality.
First, we create an array in canvasApp() to hold the set of points we will draw on the
canvas:
var points = new Array();
Next, we load a black 4×4 pixel image, point.png, which we will use to display the points
on the canvas:
var pointImage = new Image();
pointImage.src = "point.png";
Whenever we calculate a point for an object we will move, we push that point into the
points array:
points.push({x:ball.x,y:ball.y});
On each call to drawScreen(), we draw the set of points we have put into the points
array. Remember, we have to redraw every point each time because the canvas is an
immediate-mode display surface that does not retain any information about the images
drawn onto it:
196  |  Chapter 5: Math, Physics, and Animation
for (var i = 0i< points.lengthi++) {
context.drawImage(pointImagepoints[i].x, points[i].y,1,1);
}
In Figure 5-2, you can see what the ball looks like when moving on a line from one point
to another and also what the points path looks like when it is drawn.
This is the only time in this chapter where we will discuss the points
path in depth. If you see the points being drawn, you will know how
and why we have added that functionality. You should also have enough
information to remove the code when necessary.
Figure 5-2. A ball moving from one point to another along the line, with the points
drawn for illustration
Example 5-2 is the full code listing for CH5EX2.html.
Example 5-2. Moving on a simple line
<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
Moving in a Straight Line  |  197
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>CH5EX2: Moving On A Simple Line</title>
<script src="modernizr.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
window.addEventListener('load'eventWindowLoadedfalse);
function eventWindowLoaded() {
canvasApp();
}
function canvasSupport () {
return Modernizr.canvas;
}
function canvasApp() {
if (!canvasSupport()) {
return;
}
var pointImage = new Image();
pointImage.src = "point.png";
function  drawScreen () {
context.fillStyle = '#EEEEEE';
context.fillRect(00theCanvas.width, theCanvas.height);
//Box
context.strokeStyle = '#000000';
context.strokeRect(1 1theCanvas.width-2, theCanvas.height-2);
// Create ball
if (moves > 0 ) {
moves--;
ball.x += xunits;
ball.y += yunits;
}
//Draw points to illustrate path
points.push({x:ball.x,y:ball.y});
for (var i = 0i< points.lengthi++) {
context.drawImage(pointImagepoints[i].xpoints[i].y,1,1);
}
context.fillStyle = "#000000";
context.beginPath();
context.arc(ball.x,ball.y,15,0,Math.PI*2,true);
198  |  Chapter 5: Math, Physics, and Animation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested