pdf to image c# open source : Extract data from pdf into excel SDK Library API wpf asp.net windows sharepoint fulton_fulton39-part550

tempAngle = Math.floor(Math.random()*360);
tempRadians = tempAngle * Math.PI/ 180;
tempXunits = Math.cos(tempRadians) * tempSpeed;
tempYunits = Math.sin(tempRadians) * tempSpeed;
tempvideo = {x:tempX,y:tempY,width:180height:120,
speed:tempSpeedangle:tempAngle,
xunits:tempXunitsyunits:tempYunits}
videos.push(tempvideo);
}
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop20);
drawScreen();
}
gameLoop();
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div style="position: absolute; top: 50px; left: 50px;">
<canvas id="canvasOne" width="500" height="500">
Your browser does not support HTML5 Canvas.
</canvas>
</div>
</body>
</html>
The HTML5 video element combined with the canvas is an exciting,
emerging area that is being explored on the Web as you read this. One
great example of this is the exploding 3D video at CraftyMind.com.
Capturing Video with JavaScript
One of the big deficits in HTML for many years has been the lack of any pure HTML/
JavaScript interface to the microphone and camera on a user’s machine. Up until now,
most JavaScript APIs for media capture have leveraged Flash to capture audio and video.
However, in the new (mostly) Flash-less mobile HTML5 world, relying on a nonexistent
(on certain mobile devices) technology is no longer an answer. In recent months, the
W3C’s Device API Policy Working Group has stepped in to create a specification named
The HTML Media Capture API to fill this hole.
Capturing Video with JavaScript  |  369
Extract data from pdf into excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
pdf data extractor; extract data out of pdf file
Extract data from pdf into excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
c# read pdf form fields; extract data from pdf using java
Web RTC Media Capture and Streams API
Not too long ago, if you wanted to access a webcam or microphone in a web browser,
you had to fall back to using Flash. There simply was no way to access media capture
hardware in JavaScript. However, with HTML5 replacing Flash as the standard for web
browser applications, applications that relied on Flash for “exotic” features (such as
webcam and microphone access) need a new way to solve this problem. This is where
the Media Capture and Streams API comes in. It is a new browser-based API access
through JavaScript that gives access to microphones and webcams and (for our pur‐
poses) allows a developer to utilize this input on the HTML5 Canvas.
The main entry point to Media Capture and Streams is the getUserMedia() native
function that bridges the gap between the web browser and media capture devices. At
the time of this writing, getUserMedia() is still experimental. It is supported in the
following browsers:
• Google Chrome Canary
• Opera (labs version)
• Firefox (very soon, but our tests proved not quite yet)
Because support is always changing, a great resource to find out about the compatibility
of new browser features is http://caniuse.com. It will tell you which browsers can cur‐
rently support which features.
It might seem obvious, but you will also need a webcam of some sort for the next three
examples to work properly.
Example 1: Show Video
In our first example of Web RTC Media Capture, we will simply show a video from a
webcam on an HTML5 page.
First we need a <video> tag in the HTML page to hold the video that we will capture
from the webcam. We set it to autoplay so that we will see it moving as soon as it
becomes available:
<div>
<video id="thevideo" autoplay></video>
</div>
Our next job is to try to figure out whether the browser supports video capture. We do
this by creating a function named userMediaSupported()that returns a Boolean based
on the availability of the getUserMedia()method in various browsers. We need to do
this because getUserMedia()support is not the universal standard yet.
function userMediaSupported() {
return !!(navigator.getUserMedia || navigator.webkitGetUserMedia ||
370  |  Chapter 6: Mixing HTML5 Video and Canvas
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from Excel in C#.NET framework.
pdf form field recognition; extract data from pdf to excel
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
save pdf forms in reader; extract pdf form data to xml
navigator.mozGetUserMedia || navigator.msGetUserMedia);
}
If we know that getUserMedia() is supported, we call startVideo(). If not, we display
an alert box:
function eventWindowLoaded() {
if (userMediaSupported()) {
startVideo();
else {
alert("getUserMedia() Not Supported")
}
}
Next, we find the existing getUserMedia() method for the current browser and set the
local navigator.getUserMedia() function to its value. Again, we do this because sup‐
port is not universal, and this step will make it much easier to reference getUserMe
dia() in our code.
Next we call the getUserMedia() function, passing three arguments:
• An object with Boolean properties media that we want to capture (video:true and/
or audio:true) (At the time this was written, the audio property was not support‐
ed.)
• A success callback function.
• A fail callback function.
function startVideo() {
navigator.getUserMedia = navigator.getUserMedia || 
navigator.webkitGetUserMedia ||
navigator.mozGetUserMedia || navigator.msGetUserMedia;
navigator.getUserMedia({video: trueaudio:true}, mediaSuccessmediaFail);
}
The mediaFail() function simply creates an alert() box to show us an error. Most
likely, when you try this example, you will get error code 1, which means “permission
denied.” This error will occur if you are trying to run the example locally from the file
system. You need to try all the getUserMedia() examples from a web server, running
either on your own machine or on the Internet.
function mediaFail(error) {
//error code 1 = permission Denied
alert("Failed To get user media:" + error.code)
}
The mediaSuccess() function is the heart of this application. It is passed a reference to
the video object from the webcam (userMedia). To utilize this, we need to create a URL
that points to the object representing the user media so that our <video> object has a
source that it can use to start showing video.
Capturing Video with JavaScript  |  371
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing
using pdf forms to collect data; how to extract data from pdf file using java
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath); C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET. You can easily get
pdf data extraction open source; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
First, we set window.URL to whatever version of window.URL the browser supports. We
then retrieve a reference to the <video> in the HTML page. Next we use window.URL.cre
ateObjectURL() to retrieve a usable URL that points to media that our video object can
display. We set the src property of our video to that URL. Finally, we set a callback for
the onloadedmetadata event so that we can proceed with our application after the video
has started displaying:
function mediaSuccess(userMedia) {
window.URL = window.URL || window.webkitURL || window.mozURL || window.msURL;
var video = document.getElementById("thevideo");
video.src = window.URL.createObjectURL(userMedia);
video.onloadedmetadata = doCoolStuff;
}
function doCoolStuff() {
alert("Do Cool Stuff");
}
And that’s it! You can view the full code for this example in CHX6EX13.HTML in the
code distribution.
If this does not work the first time you try it, check the following:
1. Make sure you are using one of the supported browsers:
a. Google Chrome Canary
b. Opera (labs version)
2. Verify that you have a webcam on your machine. You might have to find the webcam
application on your computer and launch it. (We needed to do that on Microsoft
Windows 7, but not on Microsoft Windows 8). It’s clumsy, but it should work.
3. Verify that the app is served from a web server in an HTML page. Figure 6-14 shows
what the app should look like when it works.
372  |  Chapter 6: Mixing HTML5 Video and Canvas
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
vb extract data from pdf; extract data from pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
Figure 6-14. getUserMedia() displaying video capture of a stressed-out developer
Example 2: Put Video on the Canvas and Take a Screenshot
Next, we are going to modify the sixth example from this chapter (CH6EX6.html). As
a refresher, in that example, we used the Canvas to display a video by dynamically adding
an HTMLVideoElement object to the page and then using it as the source for video dis‐
played on the Canvas. For this example, we will use getUserMedia() as the source for
the video on the canvas and display it in the same way. However, we will add the ability
to take a screenshot of the video by using the canvas context.toDataURL() method.
The first thing we do is create a dynamic video element (videoElement) and a dynam‐
ically created <div> to hold it on the page, and then we make both invisible by setting
the style of videoDiv to display:none. This will get our video onto the page but hide
it, because we want to display it on the canvas.
Next we check our userMediaSupported() function to see whether we can access the
webcam. If so, we call startVideo() to start the media capture and then call canva
sApp() to start our application:
function eventWindowLoaded() {
videoElement = document.createElement("video");
Capturing Video with JavaScript  |  373
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp
extract data from pdf form to excel; extracting data from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Help to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a new PDF file. VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File.
how to save a pdf form in reader; collect data from pdf forms
videoDiv = document.createElement('div');
document.body.appendChild(videoDiv);
videoDiv.appendChild(videoElement);
videoDiv.setAttribute("style""display:none;");
if (userMediaSupported()) {
startVideo();
canvasApp();
else {
alert("getUserMedia() Not Supported")
}
}
The startVideo() function is nearly identical to the one we created for the last example.
We get a reference to the getUserMedia() function for this browser and then make a
call to getUserMedia(), passing an object that represents features we want to capture,
plus callback functions for success and fail:
function startVideo() {
navigator.getUserMedia = navigator.getUserMedia || 
navigator.webkitGetUserMedia ||
navigator.mozGetUserMedia || navigator.msGetUserMedia;
navigator.getUserMedia({video: trueaudio:true}, mediaSuccessmediaFail);
}
After a successful call to getUserMedia(), we set the source of videoElement to the
object represented by the userMedia argument passed automatically to mediaSuc
cess() after a successful connection with getUserMedia():
function mediaSuccess(userMedia) {
window.URL = window.URL || window.webkitURL || window.mozURL || window.msURL;
videoElement.src = window.URL.createObjectURL(userMedia);
}
In the canvasApp() function, we need to make sure that we call the play() function of
the video, or nothing will be displayed:
videoElement.play();
Just like in Example 6 (CH6EX6.html), we need to call drawScreen() in a loop to display
new frames of the video. If we leave this out, the video will look like a static image:
function gameLoop() {
window.setTimeout(gameLoop20);
drawScreen();
}
gameLoop();
In the drawScreen() function, we call drawImage() to display the updated image data
from videoElement:
374  |  Chapter 6: Mixing HTML5 Video and Canvas
function  drawScreen () {
context.drawImage(videoElement , 10, 10);
}
We also want to create a button for the user to press to take a screenshot of the image
from the webcam. We will accomplish this essentially the same way that we did it in
Chapter 3. First, we create a button on the HTML page with the id of createImageData:
<canvas id="canvasOne" width="660" height="500">
Your browser does not support the HTML 5 Canvas.
</canvas>
<form>
<input type="button" id="createImageData" value="Take Photo!">
</form>
Then, in our JavaScript, we retrieve a reference to the button and add a click event
handler:
formElement = document.getElementById("createImageData");
formElement.addEventListener("click"createImageDataPressedfalse);
The click event handler calls toDataUrl() to open a new window, using the image taken
from the video as the source:
function createImageDataPressed(e) {
window.open(theCanvas.toDataURL(),"canvasImage","left=0,top=0,width="
+ theCanvas.width + ",height=" + theCanvas.height +",toolbar=0,resizable=0");
}
Capturing Video with JavaScript  |  375
Figure 6-15. getUserMedia() taking screenshot from Canvas
And that’s it! Figure 6-15 shows what it might look like when you export the Canvas to
an image. Now, not only are we showing the video from the web cam on the Canvas,
we can manipulate it too! You can see the full code for this example in CH6EX14.html
in the code distribution.
Example 3: Create a Video Puzzle out of User-Captured Video
For our final example of the getUserMedia() function, we will use video captured from
a webcam to create the video puzzle from Example 10 (CH6EX10.html).
The first thing we need to note is that (currently) the video captured from getUserMe
dia() is fixed to 640×480 and cannot be resized. For this reason, we need to update the
code in CH6EX10.html to reflect a larger canvas with larger puzzle pieces.
In the HTML, we change the size of the Canvas to 690×530.
<canvas id="canvasOne" width="690" height="530"style="position: absolute; top:
10px; left: 10px;" >
Your browser does not support the HTML5 Canvas.
</canvas>
Then, in the JavaScript, we double the size of the pieces. In CH6EX10.html, we used
80×60 pieces, so in this example we make them 160×120:
partWidth=160;
partHeight=120;
376  |  Chapter 6: Mixing HTML5 Video and Canvas
The rest of the code changes are nearly identical to the last example. We create a <vid
eo> element in code as videoElement and use that as the object to capture video using
getUserMedia():
function eventWindowLoaded() {
videoElement = document.createElement("video");
videoDiv = document.createElement('div');
document.body.appendChild(videoDiv);
videoDiv.appendChild(videoElement);
videoDiv.setAttribute("style""display:none;");
if (userMediaSupported()) {
startVideo();
canvasApp();
else {
alert("getUserMedia() Not Supported")
}
}
function userMediaSupported() {
return !!(navigator.getUserMedia || navigator.webkitGetUserMedia ||
navigator.mozGetUserMedia || navigator.msGetUserMedia);
}
function mediaFail(error) {
//error code 1 = permission Denied
alert("Failed To get user media:" + error.code)
}
function startVideo() {
navigator.getUserMedia = navigator.getUserMedia || 
navigator.webkitGetUserMedia ||
navigator.mozGetUserMedia || navigator.msGetUserMedia;
navigator.getUserMedia({video: trueaudio:true}, mediaSuccessmediaFail);
}
function mediaSuccess(userMedia) {
window.URL = window.URL || window.webkitURL || window.mozURL || window.msURL;
videoElement.src = window.URL.createObjectURL(userMedia);
}
In our drawScreen() function, we use videoElement as the source for the puzzle pieces
we display with drawImage():
function  drawScreen () {
...
context.drawImage(videoElementimageXimageY, partWidth, partHeight
placeXplaceYpartWidth, partHeight);
Capturing Video with JavaScript  |  377
...
}
There you go. Just a few simple changes, and we now can use a video stream from a
webcam as the source for video on the canvas and then manipulate it into an interactive
application. You can see what this might look like in Figure 6-16. You can see the full
code for this example in CH6EX15.html in the code distribution.
Figure 6-16. Video puzzle on canvas using getUserMedia()
Video and Mobile
The dirty secret about video on the canvas and mobile web browsers is that, currently,
it won’t work at all. At the time of this writing, video could not be displayed on the canvas
on any mobile browser that supports HTML5. While Apple claims it will work on Safari
on the iPad, all of our tests were negative. We hope that Google, Apple, and Microsoft
will fix this situation soon because, as you can see, there are some pretty cool things you
can accomplish when you mix the HTML5 Canvas and HTML5 Video.
378  |  Chapter 6: Mixing HTML5 Video and Canvas
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested