GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
31 
Principe E: Examples
Horizon scanning
The UK Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)¶s policy portfolio includes risks, 
like  climate  change,  that  might  only  mature  over  the  very  long
-
term.  Predicting  the  future  with  any 
accuracy has always been incredibly difficult but any failure to identify and respond to these potential risks 
today could have potentially enormous consequences tomorrow.
To help DEFRA spot emerging risks, and put suitable responses in place early enough for them to be 
effective, they have introduced a Horizon Scanning and Futures program. The program seeks to identify 
the key trends and drivers that could shape DEFRA's external environment over the next 50 years and 
give DEFRA a head start in predicting—and preventing—the biggest problems.
As the program developed, DEFRA decided to conduct a baseline scan. This produced a common base 
of information on key political, economic, social, scientific, and technological trends and drivers, which 
was combined in a web database that can be searched and analyzed by researchers and policy makers 
using a number of different criteria.
Once the information had been collated and analyzed, DEFRA organized a series of seminars to inform 
staff, both internal and across the government, about how the data was being used to create new policies.
—Extract taken from Risk: Good Practice in Government (HM Treasury, UK, 2006)
Measuring the effectiveness of governance systems: human resources management
The  World  Bank  is  encouraging  the  use  of Actionable Governance Indicators  in  the  design, 
implementation,  and  assessment  of  particular  governance  systems  and  subsystems.  They  focus  on 
specific and narrowly defined aspects of governance. The World Bank¶s Human Resource Management 
Actionable Indicators diagnostic tool is designed to enable assessment of institutional arrangements and 
organizational capacities in relation to six typical human resource management objectives. The World 
Bank¶s Indicators are:
attracting and retaining required human capital within a given cadre;
ensuring a fiscally sustainable wage bill;
ensuring depoliticized, meritocratic management of staff within a given cadre;
ensuring performance
-
focusing management of staff within a given cadre;
ensuring ethical behavior by members within a given cadre; and
ensuring effective collaboration across cadres.
Further information on the indicators can be found at www.agidata.org/site/SourceProfile.aspx?id=2.
Pdf form field recognition - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to extract data from pdf to excel; flatten pdf form in reader
Pdf form field recognition - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf; extract pdf data into excel
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
32 
Principle E: Evaluation Questions
What arrangements does the public sector entity have in place for assessing the adequacy of its six 
capitals?
How often are the public sector entity¶s activities and outputs reviewed?
What skills do the governing body members need to do their jobs effectively? 
What  processes  does  the  entity  have  in  place  to  ensure  that  governing  body  members  are 
appointed on a fully transparent basis?
Does the entity have in place a nominations committee and is it working effectively?
Has the governing body established procedures to ensure that no member of the governing body is 
involved in determining his or her own remuneration?
How well does the entity¶s recruitment process identify people with the necessary skills and reach 
people from a wide cross section of society? 
How effective is the entity at ensuring governing body members and staff are able to develop their 
skills and update their knowledge as appropriate?
How effective are the entity¶s arrangements for reviewing the individual performance of governing 
body members?
Does the governing body as a whole review its effectiveness in discharging its duties on a regular 
basis?
Does the entity report on the effectiveness of the governing body in discharging its duties? 
Where  the  governing  body  is  responsible  for  making  appointments  of  non
-
executives  to  the 
governing body, are the appointments for a fixed term? Are reappointments subject to a formal 
appointment process?
How effective are the entity¶s arrangements for reviewing the individual performance of staff?
Further Reading
Consultation Draft of the International Integrated Reporting Framework (IIRC, 2013)
Information Technology for Good Governance (Francisco Magno and Ramonette Serafica, 2001)
Process Forms in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
to show the results of processing the image field. RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing
exporting pdf data to excel; extract table data from pdf to excel
C# Image: How to Process Form in C# Project with .NET Image
Imaging.Form.Processing; using RasterEdge.Imaging.Form.Recognition; form drop out, form field / zone extraction profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf form field recognition; extract data from pdf file to excel
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
33 
F.  Managing risks and performance through robust internal control and strong 
public financial management 
Public sector entities need to implement and sustain an effective performance management system 
that enables them to deliver the planned services effectively and efficiently. Risk management and 
internal control are significant and integral parts of a performance management system and crucial 
to the  achievement  of outcomes. They  consist of an ongoing  process  designed to identify  and 
address significant risks to the achievement of an entity¶s outcomes. 
 strong  system  of  financial  management  is  essential  for  the  implementation  of  public  sector 
policies and the achievement of intended outcomes through enforcing financial discipline, strategic 
allocation of resources, efficient service delivery, and accountability.
F1.  Managing risk  
Public sector entities face a wide range of uncertain internal and external factors that may affect 
achievement of their objectives. The effect of this uncertainty on their objectives is called risk and 
can be positive (opportunities) or negative (threats). Public sector entities have to deal with risk in 
all their activities, including strategic, operational, financial (including fiscal), and fraud risks. Other 
examples  include  societal  risks,  risks  to  human  rights,  and  risks  to  the  independence  of  the 
judiciary. Proper risk assessment assists entities in making informed decisions about the level of 
risk  that they  want to take,  and implementing the  necessary  controls,  in pursuit of the  entities¶ 
objectives. 
Good governance requires that the notion of risk is embedded into the culture of the entity, with 
governing body members and managers at all levels recognizing that risk management is integral 
to all their activities. It is about being risk aware rather than risk averse—entities should not be so 
risk averse that they miss out on opportunities.
Effective risk management better enables public sector entities to achieve their objectives, while 
operating effectively, efficiently, ethically, and legally, and should include:
implementing a risk management framework;
11
defining the entity¶s risk management strategy, approving the limits for risk taking, 
where 
feasible, and determining the criteria for internal control;
12
integrating the process for managing risk into the entity's overall governance, strategy and 
planning, management, reporting processes, policies, values; and culture; 
reviewing key strategic, operational, financial, and fraud risks regularly and devising 
responses consistent with achieving the entity¶s objectives and intended outcomes;
engaging staff in all aspects of the risk management process; 
11
Examples of a risk management framework include the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission 
(COSO)
¶s
Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Framework 
or  the  International  Organization  for  Standardization  (ISO)¶s 
Standard 31000:2009
Risk Management
12
The ISO 31000 risk management standard 
uses the term ³risk criteria´ to indicate the terms of reference against which the 
significance of a risk is evaluated. Other guidelines use the terms ³risk appetite´ and ³risk tolerance.´ However, as these t
erms 
are not clearly defined, this paper uses th
e term ³limits for risk taking.´
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. C#.NET PDF Barcode Reader & Scanner Controls from
fill in pdf form reader; how to fill pdf form in reader
Process Forms in .NET Winforms | Online Tutorials
Click "Image Form Field" to create a single rectangular to show the results of processing the image field. & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extracting data from pdf files; extracting data from pdf into excel
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
34 
monitoring and reviewing the risk management framework and processes on a regular basis; 
and 
reporting publicly on the effectiveness of the risk management system, for example, through 
an annual governance statement, including, where necessary, plans to address significant 
issues. 
F2.  Managing performance  
Building on the arrangements put together in the planning stage (see section D.2), public sector 
entities should ensure that effective mechanisms exist to monitor service delivery throughout all 
stages  in  the  process,  including  planning,  specification,  execution,  and  independent  post
-
implementation review. This is essential whether services are produced internally, through external 
providers, or a combination of the two. Where monitoring and review mechanisms have not been 
properly implemented prior to execution, there is a high probability that performance assessment 
will be unreliable and accountability weak.
From the perspective of the maintenance of organizational capacity, meaningful financial analysis 
and robust interpretation of results are key components in performance management. At all levels 
in an  entity,  those making  decisions  should  be  presented  with  relevant,  objective,  and  reliable 
financial analysis and advice that clearly points out financial implications and risks with regard to 
the entity¶s financial performance, position, and outlook. Information should be fit for purpose and 
not obscure key information by providing  inappropriate detail. It  will also need to be set in the 
context non
-
financial performance data, as adverse financial variances can result from favorable 
non
-
financial performance and vice versa.
Public sector entities should, therefore, continuously monitor and periodically review whether:
the intended outcomes are still valid (this is still what we want to achieve) or whether they 
should be adapted to new insights; 
the public entity's service delivery activities can still effectively and efficiently achieve those 
outcomes; and 
whether there are any changes in the internal or external environment (the context) that 
might pose a risk, positive or negative, to achieving the outcomes, which need to be 
managed. 
Monitoring  and  review  mechanisms  should  provide  governing  body  members  and  senior 
management  with  regular  reports  on  progress  of  the  approved  service  delivery  plan  and  on 
progress  toward  outcome  achievement.  Reports  should  ideally  include  detailed  performance 
analyses, both absolute and relative to peer entities. They should give a clear indication of below, 
on, or above target results, highlighting areas where corrective action is necessary. This action may 
include service  or contract termination. Reports should also indicate  where corrective  action  is 
planned, underway, or has resolved the issue.
A further aspect of managing performance in the public sector is ensuring consistency  between 
specification stages (e.g., budgets, see section D) and post implementation reporting (e.g., financial 
statements, see Principle G). For example, if the concept of resource use in the budget is a cash 
VB.NET PDF - How to Decode Barcode from PDF
PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field
html form output to pdf; save pdf forms in reader
C# Imaging - Read 2D QR Code in C#.NET
and advertising field as a promotion tool. Besides, if you want to know more detailed information on barcode reading & recognition from PDF document using C#
edit pdf form in reader; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
35 
concept  and  in  the  financial  statements  it  is  an  accrual  basis,  performance  management  and 
performance assessment are both compromised.
13
F3.  Robust internal control  
Internal control supports a public sector entity in achieving its objectives by managing its risks while 
complying with rules, regulations, and organizational policies. Internal control is an integral part of 
an entity¶s governance system and risk management arrangements, which is understood, effected, 
and  actively  monitored  by  the  entity¶s  governing  body,  management,  and  other  personnel.
14
It 
should take advantage of opportunities and counter threats, in line with risk management strategy 
and policies on internal control. Risk management strategy and policies on internal control should 
be set by the governing body in order to achieve an entity¶s objectives through, among other things:
executing effective and efficient strategic and operational processes; 
providing useful and reliable information to internal and external users for timely and informed 
decision making, whether services are delivered by the entity itself or are contracted out; 
ensuring conformance with applicable laws and regulations
, as well as with the entity¶s own 
policies, procedures, and guidelines; 
safeguarding the entity¶s resources against loss, fraud, misuse, and damage;
safeguarding the availability, confidentiality, and integrity of the entity¶s information systems, 
including IT; and 
monitoring, internal auditing, and other control activities to hold the executive to account. 
Controls are a means to an end—the effective management of risks enabling the entity to achieve 
its  objectives.  Before  designing,  implementing,  applying,  or  assessing  a  control,  public  sector 
entities should first consider the risk or combination of risks at which the control is aimed (see 
section F.1). They should also consider the need to remain agile, avoid over
-
control,  and not 
become  overly  bureaucratic.  Internal  control  should  enable,  not  hinder,  the  achievement  of 
organizational objectives. 
While the governing body should ensure that the entity¶s risk management and internal control is 
periodically monitored and evaluated, the actual assessment should be executed by the entity¶s 
management. Someone sufficiently independent from those responsible for the system, such as the 
internal  auditor,  should  provide  additional  assurance  regarding  the  adequacy  of  the  risk 
management framework and processes and of the internal controls implemented to manage risk. 
The function of  internal  auditing is to  provide independent,  objective  assurance  and consulting 
services designed to add value and improve an entity¶s operations. The internal audit activity helps 
an entity accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and 
improve the effectiveness of governance, risk management, and control processes.
It is good practice for public sector governing bodies to establish an audit committee or equivalent 
group or function. The audit committee provides another source of assurance regarding the entity¶s 
arrangements for managing risk, maintaining an effective control environment, and reporting  on 
13
 This point was made in the International Monetary Fund (IMF) publication Fiscal Transparency, Accountability and Risk (2012).  
14
Evaluating and Improving Internal Control in Organizations (IFAC, 2012) 
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
36 
financial and non
-
financial performance. Its effectiveness depends on it being independent of the 
executive. It can have a significant role in:
helping to improve the adequacy and effectiveness of risk management and internal control; 
and 
reinforcing the objectivity and importance of internal and external audits and, therefore, the 
effectiveness of the audit function. 
F4.  Strong financial management 
Strong financial  management  ensures  that  public money  is  safeguarded at all times  and used 
appropriately,  economically,  efficiently,  and  effectively.  Having  a  strong  system  of  financial 
management  underpins sustainable  decision  making,  delivery  of  services,  and  achievement  of 
outcomes in public sector entities, as all decisions and activities have direct or indirect financial 
consequences. Public sector entities should ensure that their financial management supports both 
long
-
term  achievement  of  outcomes  and  short
-
term  financial  and  operational  performance.  A 
sustainable public sector entity will have well
-
developed  financial management  integrated at  all 
organizational levels of planning and control, including management of financial risks and controls.
Strong financial management in public sector entities should consist of activities such as:
provision, analysis, and interpretation of financial and non-financial information to the 
governing body and managers, supporting them in understanding the financial health of the 
entity and progress in delivering financial objectives, and providing the information and 
analysis needed for organizational objective setting, strategy formulation, execution, and 
control; 
funding and allocation for the delivery of public services, including establishing financial 
objectives, policies and strategies, capital planning and budgeting, raising finances, tax 
planning, and managing working capital, cash flow, and financial risk; and. 
performance management through developing and implementing a financial strategy, cost 
determination, budgeting, forecasting, and financial control. 
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
37 
Principle F: Examples
Embedded risk management
Transnet is wholly owned by the South African government and is the custodian of freight rail, ports, and 
pipelines. Transnet is responsible for enabling the competitiveness, growth, and development of the South 
African economy through the delivery of reliable freight transport and the handling of services that satisfy 
customer demand.
The entity¶s risk management and control stands out because, rather than being an add
-
on, it is, in their 
own  words,  ³embedded  within  the  business.´  Transnet¶s  2012 annual report,  for  example,  not  only 
explains its risk management system, it also discusses throughout the report the actual risks and how 
they are modified. In addition, Transnet¶s enterprise risk management not only covers financial reporting 
risk but all types of risk, including health, safety, environmental, and quality risks.
Keeping risk management on track
The UK Office of Government Commerce kept its Efficiency Program on track by:
Encouraging management to get involved and helping them to understand why it¶s worth investing 
time, money, and effort in good risk management;
Using risk management on a day
-
to
-
day basis to help deliver practical outcomes, instead of as an 
occasional box
-
ticking exercise that isn¶t linked to the reality on the ground;
Investing to establish a centralized, dedicated risk management function;
Adapting and enhancing risk processes and methodologies as you go along, making sure it meets 
the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. 
Recognizing  and  responding  to  the  changing  nature  of  risks.  Previously,  the  main  risks  were 
focused on plans and planning capability; now, the focus is increasingly on delivery.
—Excerpt taken from Risk: Good Practice in Government (HM Treasury, UK, 2006)
Securing oil transportation
A state owned oil transportation  enterprise transports furnace oil through a pipeline,  primarily through 
uninhabited rural terrain. A significant operational risk arises due to unauthorized excavations, deliberate 
pilferage,  and terrorist  activities. The  security function,  outsourced  to an external  company,  frequently 
malfunctioned due to vehicle breakdown and lethargic attitude of the guards.
To  mitigate  the  risk,  the  enterprise  purchased  its  own  vehicles  to  ensure  continuous  patrolling,  and 
prepared a rotating schedule for each senior management team member to accompany a security patrol 
at least once  a year, along with a checklist to  observe during the tour. The transformation  created a 
positive ³tone at the top,´ increasing security awareness among all employees in the organization, who 
now feel motivated and provide valuable suggestions to bolster the security of the company.
The management of non
-
financial risks
The Commission believes that supervisory boards should give broader consideration to the entire range of 
risks  faced  by  their  company.  Extending  the  reporting  requirements  with  regard  to  non
-
financial 
parameters  would  help  establish  a  more  comprehensive  risk  profile  of  the  company,  enabling  more 
effective design of strategies to address risks. This additional focus would encourage companies to adopt 
a sustainable and long
-
term strategic approach to their business.
—Excerpt  from  Action  Plan:  European  Company  Law  and  Corporate  Governance—A  Modern  Legal 
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
38 
Framework  for  More  Engaged  Shareholders  and  Sustainable  Companies  (European  Commission). 
Although this report focused on the private sector it also has relevance to public sector governance.
A whole system approach
Public financial management (PFM) drives the performance of the public  sector through  effective and 
efficient use of public money. It is the system by which financial resources are planned, directed, and 
controlled to enable the efficient and effective delivery of public service goals in a specific jurisdiction. It 
spans  a  range  of  activities—including  planning  and  budgeting,  management  accounting,  financial 
reporting, financial controls, and internal and external auditing—that contribute to effective, transparent 
governance and strong public accountability.
The  effectiveness  of  the  overall  PFM  system  in  a  jurisdiction  depends  on  a  network  of  interlocking 
processes, which operate within a framework of public sector entities at global, regional, national, and 
sub
-
national levels. The quality of PFM depends on a number of important variables, including (a) how 
well PFM systems in individual organizations work; (b) the quality of inputs provided to the system; and (c) 
the  feedback  and  control  mechanisms  that  ensure  a  rigorous  focus  on  delivery  of  outputs  and 
achievement of outcomes. Strong PFM also requires the reporting of fiscal forecasts and other relevant 
information in an accurate, transparent, and timely manner for public accountability and decision making. 
Fiscal transparency—defined as the clarity, reliability, frequency, timeliness, and relevance of public fiscal 
reporting  and the openness to  the  public  of the government¶s fiscal policy making  process—is a key 
element of effective PFM. 
CIPFA¶s 2010 report, Public Financial Management: A Whole System Approach, proposes an integrated 
approach to the design and improvement of public financial management. The whole system approach 
looks at mechanisms to optimize overall outcomes rather than the performance of individual elements 
and, in doing so, provides an important foundation for the wider picture of public sector governance.
Measuring the effectiveness of governance systems: PFM
The  World  Bank  is  encouraging  the  use  of  Actionable  Governance  Indicators  (AGIs)
in  the  design, 
implementation,  and  assessment  of  particular  governance  systems  and  subsystems.  They  focus  on 
specific and narrowly defined aspects of governance. The Public Expenditure and Finance Accountability 
(PEFA) Indicators, developed by the PEFA Program, provide an officially endorsed set of AGIs, which 
measure  and  monitor  the performance  of  the  public financial  management  systems,  processes,  and 
institutions of a country¶s central government, legislature, and external audit. The dimensions covered by 
the PEFA Indicators include:
credibility of the budget;
comprehensiveness and transparency;
policy
-
based budgeting;
predictability and control in budget execution; and
accounting, recording, and reporting.
Further information on the indicators can be found at http://pefa.org/en/content/pefa
-
framework
-
material
-
1.
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
39 
Principle F: Evaluation Questions
How effective is the entity¶s risk management system?
How does the entity assess whether its risk management system is working effectively?
Is the management information received by those making decisions robust, objective, and timely?
Are  action  plans  developed  and  implemented  correcting  any  deficiencies  found  in  the  internal 
control system? 
Are the entity¶s PFM practices based on international standards?
Does financial management support the delivery of services and transformational change as well as 
securing good stewardship?
Are the major risks reported comprehensively and at least annually? 
Further reading
Risk Management: Principles and Guidelines ISO 31000: 2009 (ISO, 2009)
Enterprise Risk  Management—Integrated  Framework (Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the 
Treadway Commission, or COSO, 2004)
GOV  9120  Internal  Control:  Providing  a  Foundation  for  Accountability  in  Government (International 
Organization of Supreme Audit Organizations, or INTOSAI, 2001)
GOV 9130 Guidelines for Internal Control Standards for the Public Sector—Further Information on Entity 
Risk Management (INTOSAI, 2004)
Fiscal Transparency, Accountability, and Risk (IMF, 2012)
Evaluating and Improving Internal Control in Organizations (IFAC, 2012)
Public Financial Management: A Whole System Approach (CIPFA, 2010)
G.  Implementing good practices in transparency and reporting to deliver 
effective accountability 
Accountability  is  about  ensuring  that  those  making  decisions  and  delivering  services  are 
answerable  for  them.  Effective  accountability  is  concerned  not  only  with  reporting  on  actions 
completed but ensuring stakeholders are able to understand and respond as the entity plans and 
carries out its activities in an open manner.
G1.  Implementing good practices in transparency  
The public sector entity, as a whole, should be open and accessible to its various stakeholders 
including citizens, service users, and its staff. Accountability reports should, therefore, be written 
and communicated in  an  open  and understandable  style appropriate to  the  intended audience. 
There are now many different channels for public sector entities to use to communicate with their 
stakeholders,  including  web
-
based  information  and  social  media.  In  providing  information,  a 
balance needs to be struck so that the right amount of information is provided through appropriate 
channels of communication to satisfy transparency demands while not becoming too onerous for 
the entity or for the receiver. 
GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
40 
Public scrutiny creates a demand for transparency and improved accountability, so its influence can 
help to build pressure for a more open, honest, and, ultimately, more effective public sector. They 
can be formal, such as a through a formal legislature committee, or informal, such as via the media.
G2.  Implementing good practices in reporting  
Public  sector  entities  need  to  demonstrate  that  they  have  delivered  their  stated commitments, 
requirements, and priorities and have used public resources effectively in doing so. They, therefore, 
need to report publicly at least annually, so that stakeholders can understand and make judgments 
on issues such as how the entity is performing and whether it is delivering value for money and has 
sound stewardship of resources. It is also important that the process for gathering information and 
compiling the annual report ensures that  the  governing body  and senior management own  the 
results shown.
To  demonstrate  good  practice,  governing  bodies  should  assess  the  extent  to  which  they  are 
applying the principles of good governance, set out in  this  International Framework, and report 
publicly on this assessment, including an action plan for improvement.
The performance information and accompanying financial statements published by a public sector 
entity should be prepared on a consistent and timely basis. They should allow for comparison with 
other,  similar  entities  and  be  prepared  using  internationally  accepted  high
-
quality  standards. 
International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSASs), as issued by the International Public 
Sector Accountancy Standards Board (IPSASB), provide the most complete suite of international 
financial reporting standards developed specifically for the public sector.
External audit, provided by qualified professionals, is also an essential element of the public sector 
entity¶s accountability by providing a review by an independent, qualified person of the regularity 
and reliability  of  an  entity¶s  financial reports. External  audit  involves analytical  review, systems 
evaluation, compliance, and substantive testing. In particular, an opinion is given on the entity¶s 
financial  statements  and  on  whether  they  have  been  prepared  in  accordance  with  legal 
requirements  and  a  recognized  reporting  framework.  External  auditors  assist  governing  body 
members  in  discharging  their  responsibilities  by  making  appropriate  recommendations  for 
corrective action in response to audit findings. External audit reports made publicly available in a 
timely and accessible manner assist in empowering the public to hold the government and public 
sector entities to account. 
In  many  jurisdictions,  the  independent  supreme  audit  institutions¶  (SAIs)  function  is  extremely 
important in providing independent and objective oversight of a public entity¶s governance, risk, and 
control processes and the stewardship of public resources. The oversight responsibility involves not 
only financial reporting but also operational processes, including accountability for efficiency and 
effectiveness as well as performance reporting. SAIs require sufficient capacity to hold public sector 
entities to account effectively. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested