convert pdf to image c# free : Extract data from pdf file software application dll winforms azure web page web forms guidelines_for_audio0-part680

GUIDELINES FOR THE CREATION OF DIGITAL COLLECTIONS 
Digitization Best Practices for Audio 
This document sets forth guidelines for digitizing audio materials for CARLI Digital Collections.  
The issues described concern sample rates, bit-depths, file formats, and equipment for the 
analog-to-digital conversion of audio materials.  Background information on digital audio and a 
bibliography of selected additional readings are also provided. 
This document was created by the CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group (DCUG), standards 
subcommittee. 
For questions about this document, please contact CARLI at support@carli.illinois.edu
!"#$%&'()$*)"#+%,(-./"%0($"#1%!*$23".$4#1%5*/"%56'-($#%
There are several standards associated with digital audio.  For commercial audio CDs, 
manufacturers established the standard of 44.1 kHz sample rate with a 16-bit file, based on the 
fact that the highest frequency recordable is one half of the sample rate.  This means a 44.1 kHz 
recording will support a top frequency of 22 kHz.  Since most humans cannot hear sounds above 
20 kHz, the music industry adopted the 44.1 kHz sampling rate for digital audio recordings 
knowing that it would capture all human-audible sound.  
Digital audio for use in libraries and cultural institutions—especially for preservation-quality 
audio and audio digitized from an analog source—should use a higher sample rate and file bit-
depth.  Several specific reasons for richer files include: the accurate capture of noise like clicks, 
pop, and other inaudible information that resides in frequencies higher than 44.1 kHz; desire to 
communicate inaudible harmonic information that impact perception of sound; ability to record 
and provide content that, although not necessarily heard, helps listeners understand and hear 
better space, depth, and instrument location in stereo and surround sound recordings; and to 
accommodate future user applications.  A higher bit-depth allows more audio information to be 
stored within the digital file, including support for a greater dynamic range.  Based on these 
reasons, the current standard for archival digitization of analog recordings requires the sample 
rate to be 96 kHz with a 24-bit depth.  
Master audio files should be saved uncompressed and in a widely-used file format, with 
maximum likelihood of continued support. The WAV PCM file type, developed by Microsoft, is 
readable by most audio software programs. Broadcast WAV (BWF) is an extension of the WAV 
Extract data from pdf file - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
filling out pdf forms with reader; extracting data from pdf into excel
Extract data from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
html form output to pdf; extract data from pdf file to excel
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
2
PCM format that includes metadata in the file header. Apple Computer's AIFF format is also 
widely used, although less so than WAV and BWF. Of these formats, WAV PCM or WAV BWF 
are preferred for long-term storage and maximum flexibility.  AIFF is also acceptable. 
Access copies for audio files may be saved in compressed formats that allow for quicker transfer 
or streaming via the Internet. The MP3 format is widely-supported, is playable on nearly all 
handheld devices, and is commonly used for web delivery.  MP3 is the preferred format.  MP3 
files saved at 192 Kbps (the bit-rate) are recommended for good quality compressed audio.   
Windows Media, Real Audio, and Apple's Quicktime are also widely used formats for streaming 
audio, and format selection should based on local preference and the institution's ability to 
provide support for users of that format. 
In summation, the following table should serve to identify the proper file format, sample rate, 
and bit-depth of captured audio for the preservation master. 
Recommendation 
Level 
File Format  Sample Rate  File Bit-depth 
Usage Example 
Minimum 
WAV / AIFF  44,000 
16 
Audio from 
commercial CD 
Special 
Consideration 
WAV / AIFF  48,000 
24 
Human voice only, 
no instrumental 
music 
Recommended 
WAV / AIFF  96,000 
24 
Oral History 
recording, especially 
if there is music. 
Natural sounds or 
sounds from nature. 
The following table should serve to identify the proper file format, sample rate, and bit-depth of 
captured audio for the presentation format. 
Recommendation 
Level 
File Format  Bit rate 
Usage Example 
Minimum 
MP3 
128 Kbps 
Oral history, without music 
Recommended 
MP3 
192 Kbps 
Most audio 
Special 
MP3 
320 Kbps 
Very high fidelity required. 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; edit pdf form in reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
how to extract data from pdf file using java; extracting data from pdf to excel
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
3
Background Information 
The quality and resolution of digitized audio is determined by two factors: the number of times 
per second the amplitude of the wave is measured (the sample rate) and the bit-depth used to 
record each measurement. 
Amplitude is measured or described in kilohertz (kHz).  Using the commercial audio CD as an 
example, the music is recorded at 44.1 kHz, meaning that each second of audio is made up of 
44,100 distinct amplitude measurements in a single point of the WAVE file, be it a trough or a 
peak.   The illustration below demonstrates how lower frequencies contain fewer waves in a 
specific amount of time while higher frequencies include more waves in the same period of time.   
The second factor is bit depth, which refers to the quality or richness of the measurement at each 
of those 44,100 distinct points.  If one can imagine, from left to right, margin to margin on this 
page, a series of waves with crests and valleys, a digital converter chooses various points along 
those waves to capture sound, at which point it will convert that audio information into a digital 
reproduction.   The more points captured along each wave, the higher the bit-depth will be.  Bit-
depth is the number of points captured per sample, or amplitude wave.  The following image 
illustrates how the digital capture points might be distributed when digitizing audio, or saving a 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
External cross references. Private data of other applications. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
using pdf forms to collect data; how to save fillable pdf form in reader
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Merge PDF with byte array, fields. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end
extract data from pdf forms; how to save pdf form data in reader
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
4
digital audio recording, as a 16-bit file and a 24-bit file.  Note how there are a third more points 
of the sound wave captured in the 24-bit example.   
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
extract data from pdf into excel; sign pdf form reader
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. External cross references. Private data of other applications. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; exporting pdf data to excel
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
5
Additionally, the bit-depth is mathematically proportional to the dynamic range of sound, 
meaning that higher bit-depths capture a greater range of sound.  A 16-bit recording is only 
capable of capturing audio up to 96 decibels; a 24-bit recording can capture up to 144 decibels.   
Higher bit-depths can represent a wider volume range, possessing a greater “dynamic range.”
1
1
CDP Digital Audio Working Group, Digital Audio Best Practices Version 2.1, October 2006, pg. 8, 
http://www.mndigital.org/digitizing/standards/audio.pdf 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
extract table data from pdf to excel; flatten pdf form in reader
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
export pdf form data to excel; extract pdf form data to excel
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
6
As noted above, the quality of the digital audio on commercial audio CDs has a sample rate of 
44.1 kHz and the file is saved as a 16-bit file.  For preservation purposes, however, Mike Casey 
and Bruce Gordon state in Best Practices for Audio Preservation that this [commercial audio 
CD sampling rate and bit depth] combination is now almost universally considered inadequate 
for audio preservation of analog recordings.”
2
The International Association of Sound and 
Audiovisual Archives (IASA), the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation 
Program (NDIIPP), and the Council for Library and Information Resources (CLIR) also 
recommend higher sampling rates and bit-depths because they create a reproduction that retains 
more information. Caroline R. Arms and Carl Fleischhauer at the Library of Congress write, 
“creating these ‘high resolution’ digital audio files is analogous to practices employed in the still 
image preservation world, where the term ‘rich’ is sometimes applied to high quality 
preservation masters.”
3
There are certain considerations one must take into account when creating these richer files.  
One, the equipment required to do so is not standard and may require additional pieces.
4
Two, 
the resulting files will be larger and require more digital storage space.  A stereo recording that 
meets the CD industry standard is only one quarter the size of the same recording at the levels 
suggested by the archival community.  The following chart shows the approximate differences in 
files size of a 60-minute recording at different sample rates. 
5
2
Casey, Mike and Bruce Gordon, “Best Practices for Audio Preservation,” 
http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/projects/sounddirections/papersPresent/index.shtml 
3
Library of Congress, National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program, “Sustainability of Digital Formats 
Planning for Library of Congress Collections” http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/index.shtml 
4
5
An external converter is recommended by IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 6   
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
7
783*6%9(.$8'"%(:3%;:)63*:<%,6=$>('"%
Capture and Encoding 
Sony Sound Forge 
Form the website: Sound Forge is a professional digital audio production suite.  It is capable of 
capturing raw audio and converting it to web-ready formats.  Sound Forge also provides 
advanced functionality for recording, editing, and saving audio files. Not available for Macs. 
http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/soundforge 
Audacity 
Audacity is a free, open source digital audio editor and recorder. It allows the user to modify 
audio files, apply effects, cut/delete/add segments, repeat parts, amplify or decrease the volume, 
import from MIDI, record live audio, and digitize recordings from cassette tapes, vinyl records, 
or minidiscs. Audacity is available for a Mac, Windows, or Linux platform. 
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ 
Adobe Audition 
Like Sony Sound Forge, this is a professional, feature-rich audio capture and editing solution.  It 
is only available for the Windows operating system. 
http://www.adobe.com/products/audition/ 
SoundTap 
SoundTap lets you record audio to either wav or mp3 format.  For Windows-based machines.  
Formats that can be converted include streaming radio, VoIP calls and Instant Messaging 
conversations.  It is MAC and PC compatible. 
http://www.nch.com.au/soundtap/ 
Transcoding/Encoding Software 
Note: In addition to those listed below, Sound Forge, Audacity, and Adobe Audition have 
the ability to save (convert/export) files in specific formats. 
MediaCoder Audio Edition 
Audio Edition is an open source audio transcoding tool based on MediaCoder, which provides 
broader support for media encoding such as video. All the audio codecs are integrated into a 
single piece of software. The software supports most audio formats and can convert audio 
streams in video files. It can also convert audio files from DVD/VCDs as well as CD formats. 
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
8
Network streaming audio can be directly converted using Media Coder.  It is native to Windows 
but can run on Mac and Linux with WINE. 
http://www.mediacoderhq.com/index.htm 
FFmpeg 
FFmpeg is an open source, command line program that can record, convert and stream digital 
audio and video in numerous formats.
FFmpeg is a command line tool that is composed of a 
collection of free software / open source libraries. It includes libavcodec, an audio/video codec 
library used by several other projects, and libavformat, an audio/video container mux and demux 
library. 
http://ffmpeg.mplayerhq.hu/ 
Audio Playback Software 
Note: These are in addition to popular playback software such as Windows Media Player, 
Apple iTunes, and Quicktime that come preloaded with most operating systems. 
VLC Media Player 
VLC Media Player is an open source media player with wide support for all media (both audio 
and video) formats.  It is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. 
http://www.videolan.org/vlc/ 
MPlayer 
MPlayer is a free and open source media player. The program is available for all major operating 
systems, including Linux and other Unix-like systems, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X. 
Versions for OS/2, Syllable, AmigaOS and MorphOS are also available. 
http://www.mplayerhq.hu/ 
!*?/*6<'(.4@%6=%,"/")$"3%0"(3*:<#%
CLIR (Council on Library and Information Resources) Reports 
Publication 128: Survey of the State of Audio Collections in Academic Libraries 
http://clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub128abst.html 
Publication 135: Copyright Issues Relevant to Digital Preservation and Dissemination of 
Pre-1972 Commercial Sound Recordings by Libraries and Archives 
http://clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub135abst.html 
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
9
Publication 137: Capturing Analog Sound for Digital Preservation: Report of a 
Roundtable Discussion of Best Practices for Transferring Analog Discs and Tapes 
http://clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub137abst.html 
E-MELD (Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Language Data) Classroom, Digitization of 
Audio Files 
http://emeld.org/school/classroom/audio/index.html 
Federal Agencies, Digitization Guidelines Initiative, Audio-Visual Working Group 
http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/audio-visual/ 
Harvard Library, Weissman Preservation Center, Guidance for Digitizing Audio 
http://preserve-new.harvard.edu:8883/guidelines/audiodig.html 
Historical Voices, Digitizing Speech Recordings for Archival Purposes 
http://www.historicalvoices.org/papers/audio_digitization.pdf 
Indiana University Digital Library Program, Sound Directions, Digital Preservation and Access 
for Global Audio Heritage 
http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/projects/sounddirections/ 
Indiana University Digital Library Program, Variations3, Administrator’s Guide – Audio 
Digitization 
https://wiki.dlib.indiana.edu/confluence/display/V3/Administrator%27s+Guide+-
+Audio+Digitization 
iasa (International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives), The Safeguarding of Audio 
Heritage: Ethics, Principles and Preservation Strategy 
http://www.iasa-web.org/de/safeguarding-audio-heritage-ethics-principles-and-preservation-
strategy 
JISC Digital Media, Audio Advice 
http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/audio/ 
Library of Congress, NDIIPP (National Digital Information Infrastructure & Preservation 
Program) Sustainability of Digital Formats, Sound 
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/content/sound.shtml 
Multimedia Data information from Cardiff School of Computer Science course CM0340 by 
David Marshall 
http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/Multimedia/node141.html 
CARLI Digital Collections Users’ Group  Links revised: 09/23/2014 
10
NINCH (National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage) Guide to Good Practices, 
Audio/Video Capture and Management 
http://www.nyu.edu/its/humanities/ninchguide/VII/ 
NISO, A Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections 
http://www.niso.org/publications/rp/framework3.pdf 
University of Texas, College of Education, Digitizing Sound Files 
http://www.edb.utexas.edu/multimedia/PDFfolder/DigitizingSound.pdf 
Wellesley College, Library & Technology, Audio Editing 
http://new.wellesley.edu/lts/techsupport/macs/itunesaudio 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested