convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Extracting data from pdf forms to excel application Library utility azure asp.net windows visual studio Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML1-part746

xv
6
Serious HTML
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
What else is there to know about HTML?  
You’re well on your way to 
mastering HTML. In fact, isn’t it about time we move on to CSS and learn how to make 
all this bland markup look fabulous? Before we do, we need to make sure your HTML is 
really tight (you know... buttoned up, ship shape, nailed down) and we’re going to do that 
by getting serious about the way we write our HTML. Don’t get us wrong, you’ve been 
writing first-class HTML all along, but there’s a few things you can do to help the browser 
faithfully display your pages and to make sure that little mistakes don’t creep into your 
markup. What’s in it for you? Pages that display more uniformly across browsers (and 
are readable on mobile devices and screen readers for the visually impaired), pages that 
load faster, and pages that are guaranteed to play well with CSS. Get ready, this is the 
chapter where you move from Web tinkerer to Web professional.
Cubicle Conversation 
224
A brief history of HTML   
226
We can’t have your pages putting the browser into quirks mode 
229
Adding the document type definition   
231
Meet the  W3C validator 
234
Validating the Head First Lounge 
235
Houston, we have a problem... 
236
Adding a <meta> tag to specify the content type   
240
Making the validator happy with a <meta> content tag...   
241
Third time’s the charm? 
242
Changing the doctype to strict 
246
Do we have validation? 
247
Fixing the nesting problem   
249
One more chance to be strict... 
250
Strict HTML 4.01, grab the handbook  
252
Fireside Chat  
256
HTML Archeology  
259
Exercise Solutions   
263
Extracting data from pdf forms to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract data out of pdf file; sign pdf form reader
Extracting data from pdf forms to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extract data from pdf file to excel; fill in pdf form reader
xvi
7
Putting the ‘X’ into HTML
moving to xhtml
We’ve been keeping a dirty secret from you. 
We know you 
thought
you bought an HTML book, but this is really an XHTML book in disguise. In 
fact, we’ve been teaching you mostly XHTML all along. You’re probably wondering, 
just what the heck is XHTML? Well, meet eXtensible HTML – otherwise known as 
XHTML – the next evolution of HTML.  It’s leaner, meaner, and even more tuned 
for compatibility with a wide range of devices beyond browsers. In this short little 
chapter we’re going to get you from HTML to XHTML in three simple steps. So, 
turn the page, you’re almost there... (and then we’re on to CSS).
Maintains her 
own blog.
I like keeping up with 
trends and technologies. 
XHTML is the future, and since 
it’s almost exactly like HTML, 
why not go with the better 
technology?
What is XML?    
267
What does this have to do with HTML? 
268
So why would you want to use XHTML? 
270
The XHTML 1.0 checklist   
272
Going from strict HTML to XHTML 1.0 
274
Old school HTML 4.01 Strict 
275
New and improved XHTML 1.0 
275
Validation: it’s not just for HTML 
277
Fireside Chat 
280
HTML or XHTML? The choice is yours... 
282
Exercise Solutions   
284
table of contents
C# Word: How to Extract Text from C# Word in .NET Project
plain text as well as the formatting data to ensure Visual C# sample code for extracting text from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extract pdf data to excel; extract data from pdf
VB.NET Word: Extract Text from Microsoft Word Document in VB.NET
locked as static images and the data is inaccessible Guides in VB.NET. Apart from extracting text from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
save data in pdf form reader; extracting data from pdf into excel
xvii
8
Adding a Little Style
getting started with CSS
Five-Minute
Mystery
body
html
title
head
style
meta
h1
p
h2
p
p
img
a
em
a
I was told there’d be CSS in this book.  
So far you’ve been 
concentrating on learning XHTML to create the structure of your Web pages.  But as 
you can see, the browser’s idea of style leaves a lot to be desired. Sure, we could 
call the fashion police, but we don’t need to.  With CSS, you’re going to completely 
control the presentation of your pages, often without even changing your XHTML. 
Could it really be so easy? Well, you
are
going to have to learn a new language; after 
all, Webville is a bilingual town.  After reading this chapter’s guide to learning the 
language of CSS, you’re going to be able to stand on 
either
side of Main Street and 
hold a conversation.
You’re not in Kansas anymore... 
286
Overheard on Webville’s “Trading Spaces” 
288
Using CSS with XHTML   
289
Let’s put a line under the welcome message, too   
295
Specifying a second rule, just for the <h1> 
296
Getting the Lounge style into the elixirs and directions pages 
303
Linking to the external style sheet 
305
It’s time to talk about your inheritance... 
311
What if we move the font up the family tree? 
312
Overriding inheritance 
314
Creating a selector for the class 
318
Taking classes further... 
320
The world’s smallest and fastest guide to how styles are applied 
322
Who gets the inheritance?   
326
Making sure the Lounge CSS validates  
329
Exercise Solutions   
333
VB.NET Image: Demo Code to Read & Capture Code 93 Barcode from
accurate & quick barcode information extracting function, has String In datas Debug.WriteLine(data) Next End & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet; pdf form save in reader
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Tag Viewer SDK, Read & Edit TIFF Tag Using VB.
page contain the information about data type, count manipulating controls, like TIFF text extracting control to ASP.NET AJAX, Silverlight, Windows Forms as well
extracting data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf c#
xviii
9
Expanding your Vocabulary
styling with fonts and colors
table of contents
Your CSS language lessons are coming along nicely. 
You already have the basics of CSS down and you know how to create CSS 
rules to select and determine the style of the elements. Now what you need is 
to increase your vocabulary, and that means picking up some new properties 
and learning about what they can do for you. In this chapter we’re going to work 
through some of the most common properties that affect the display of text. To 
do that, you’ll need to learn a few things about fonts and color. You’re going to 
see you don’t have to be stuck with the fonts everyone else uses, or the clunky 
sizes and styles the browser uses as the defaults for paragraphs and headings. 
You’re also going to see there is a lot more to color than meets the eye. 
1
2
3
4
5
6
78
9
A
B
C
D
E
10
11
F
12
13
14
15
0
Text and fonts from 30,000 feet 
342
What is a font family anyway? 
344
Specifying font families using CSS 
347
Dusting off Tony’s Journal   
348
How do I deal with everyone having different fonts? 
351
So, how should I specify my font sizes?   
354
Let’s make these changes to the font sizes in Tony’s Web page 
356
Changing a font’s weight 
359
Adding style to your fonts 
361
Styling Tony’s quotes with a little italic   
362
How do Web colors work?   
364
How do I specify Web colors? Let me count the ways... 
367
The two minute guide to hex codes 
370
How to find Web colors 
372
Back to Tony’s page...   
375
Everything you ever wanted to know about text-decorations  
377
Removing the underline...   
378
Exercise Solutions   
381
xix
10
Getting Intimate with Elements
the box model
To do advanced Web construction you really need to know 
your building materials.  
In this chapter we’re going to take a close look 
at our building materials: the XHTML elements. We’re going to put block and inline 
elements right under the microscope and see what they’re made of.  You’re going to 
see how you can control just about every aspect of how an element is constructed 
with CSS. But we’re not going to stop there; you’re also going to see how you can 
give elements unique identities. And, if that weren’t enough, you’re going to discover 
why you might want to use multiple style sheets.
The lounge gets an upgrade   
386
Starting with a few simple upgrades   
388
Checking out the new line height 
390
Getting ready for some major renovations 
391
A closer look at the box model... 
392
What you can do to boxes...   
394
Creating the guarantee style   
399
Padding, border, and margins for the guarantee   
401
Adding some padding 
401
Now let’s add some margin   
402
Adding a background image   
404
Fixing the background image  
407
How do you add padding only on the left? 
408
How do you increase the margin just on the right? 
409
A two-minute guide to borders 
410
Border fit and finish 
412
Interview with an HTML class 
414
The id attribute   
416
Using an id in the lounge 
418
Remixing style sheets 
420
Using multiple style sheets   
421
Exercise Solutions    
426
xx
11
Advanced Web Construction
divs and spans
table of contents
It’s time to get ready for heavy construction.  
In this chapter 
we’re going to roll out two new XHTML elements, called <div> and <span>. These 
are no simple “two by fours;” these are full blown steel beams.  With <div> and 
<span>, you’re going to build some serious supporting structures, and once you’ve 
got those structures in place, you’re going to be able to style them all in new and 
powerful ways. Now, we couldn’t help but notice that your CSS toolbelt is really 
starting to fill up, so it’s time to show you a few shortcuts that will make specifying all 
these properties a lot easier. And, we’ve also got some special guests in this chapter, 
the 
pseudo-classes
, which are going to allow you to create some very interesting 
selectors. (But, if you’re thinking that “pseudo-classes” would make a great name for 
your next band; too late, we beat you to it.)
Weekly Elixir 
Specials
Lemon Breeze
Chai Chiller
Black Brain Brew
The ultimate healthy drink, 
this elixir combines herbal 
botanicals, minerals, and 
vitamins with a twist of 
lemon into a smooth citrus 
wonder that will keep your 
immune system going all 
day and all night.
Not your traditional chai, 
this elixir mixes maté with 
chai spices and adds 
 an extra chocolate kick 
for a caffeinated taste 
sensation on ice.
Want to boost your 
memory?  Try our Black 
Brain Brew elixir, made 
with black oolong tea and 
just a touch of espresso.  
Your brain will thank you 
for the boost.
Join us any evening for these and all 
our wonderful elixirs.
A close look at the elixirs HTML 
431
Let’s explore how we can divide a page into logical sections  
433
Adding a border    
440
An over-the-border test drive   
440
Adding some real style to the elixirs section 
441
The game plan 
442
Working on the elixir width   
442
Adding the basic styles to the elixirs 
447
What we need is a way to select descendants 
453
Changing the color of the elixir headings 
455
Fixing the line height 
456
It’s time to take a little shortcut... 
458
Adding <span>s in three easy steps 
464
The <a> element and its multiple personalities   
468
How can you style elements based on their state?   
469
Putting those pseudo-classes to work   
471
Isn’t it about time we talk about the “cascade”?   
473
The cascade 
475
Welcome to the “What’s my specificity game”   
476
Putting it all together 
477
Exercise Solutions   
483
xxi
12
Arranging Elements
layout and positioning
It’s time to teach your XHTML elements new tricks. 
We’re not 
going to let those XHTML elements just sit there anymore; it’s about time they get 
up and help us create some pages with real 
layouts
. How? Well, you’ve got a good 
feel for the <div> and <span> structural elements and you know all about how the 
box model works, right? So, now it’s time to use all that knowledge to craft some real 
designs. No, we’re not just talking about more background and font colors, we’re 
talking about full blown professional designs using multi-column layouts. This is the 
chapter where everything you’ve learned comes together.
Did you do the Super Brain Power?   
488
Use the flow, Luke   
489
What about inline elements?   
491
How it all works together 
492
How to float an element 
495
Behind the scenes at the lounge 
497
The new Starbuzz   
499
Move the sidebar just below the header  
504
Set the width of the sidebar and float it  
504
Fixing the two-column problem 
507
Setting the margin on the main section  
508
Back to clearing up the overlap problem 
511
Righty tighty, lefty loosey 
514
Liquid and frozen designs   
517
How absolute positioning works 
520
Changing the Starbuzz CSS   
523
One tradeoff you can make to fix the footer 
527
Positioning the award 
529
How does fixed positioning work? 
535
Using a negative left property value   
537
Getting relative   
539
To three-columns and beyond... 
541
Exercise Solutions   
544
p
h2
p
p
img
img
img
img
em
span
em
span
p id=”amazing”
text
text
text
text
h2
h1
text
text
text
text
text
text
text
xxii
13
table of contents
Getting Tabular
tables and more lists
If it walks like a table and talks like a table...  
There comes a 
time in life when we have to deal with the dreaded
tabular data
. Whether you need to 
create a page representing your company’s inventory over the last year, or a catalog 
of your Beanie Babies collection (don’t worry, we won’t tell), you know you need to 
do it in HTML; but how? Well, have we got a deal for you: order now and in a single 
chapter we’ll reveal the secrets of tables that will allow you to put your very own 
data right inside HTML tables. But there’s more: with every order we’ll throw in our 
exclusive guide to styling HTML tables. And, if you act now, as a special bonus, we’ll 
throw in our guide to styling HTML lists. Don’t hesitate, call now!
How do we make tables with HTML?   
551
How to create a table using HTML   
552
What the browser creates 
553
Tables dissected...   
554
Adding a caption and a summary 
557
Before we start styling, let’s get the table back into Tony’s page... 
559
Getting those borders to collapse 
564
How about some color? 
566
Tony made an interesting discovery...   
567
Another look at Tony’s table   
568
How to tell cells to span more than one row 
569
The new and improved table  
571
Trouble in paradise? 
572
Overriding the CSS for the nested table headings  
576
Giving Tony’s site the final polish 
577
Exercise Solutions   
588
xxiii
14
Getting Interactive
xhtml forms
So far all your Web communication has been one way: 
from 
your page
to 
your visitors
Golly, wouldn’t it be nice if your visitors 
could talk back? That’s where HTML forms come in: once you enable your pages 
with forms (along with a little help from a Web server), your pages are going to be 
able to gather customer feedback, take an online order, get the next move in an 
online game, or collect the votes in a “hot or not” contest. In this chapter you’re going 
to meet a whole team of XHTML elements that work together to create Web forms.  
You’ll also learn a bit about what goes on behind the scenes in the server to support 
forms, and we’ll even talk about keeping those forms stylish (a controversial topic – 
read on and see why).
How forms work   
592
How forms work in the browser 
593
What you write in  XHTML   
594
What the browser creates 
595
How the <form> element works 
596
Getting ready to build the Bean Machine form   
604
Adding the <form> element   
605
How <form> element names work 
606
Back to getting those <input> elements in your XHTML...  
608
Adding some more input elements to your form   
609
Adding the <select> element  
610
Give the customer a choice of whole or ground beans 
612
Punching the radio buttons   
613
Completing the form 
614
Adding the checkboxes and textarea   
615
Watching GET in action 
621
To Table or Not to Table? That’s the question...   
626
Getting the form elements into a table   
627
Styling the form and the table with CSS 
630
Exercise Solutions    
635
xxiv
15
The Top Ten Topics (we didn’t cover)
i
Index
651 
table of contents
appendix: leftovers
We covered a lot of ground, and 
you’re almost finished with this 
book. 
We’ll miss you, but before we let you go, 
we wouldn’t feel right about sending you out into 
the world without a little more preparation.  We 
can’t possibly fit everything you’ll need to know 
into this relatively small chapter.  Actually, we 
did
originally include everything you need to know 
about XHTML and CSS (not already covered by 
the other chapters), by reducing the type point 
size to .00004.  It all fit, but nobody could read it.  
So, we threw most of it away, and kept the best 
bits for this Top Ten chapter.
More Selectors 
640 
Frames   
642 
Multimedia & Flash 
643 
Tools for Creating Web Pages  
644 
Client-side Scripting 
645 
Server-side Scripting 
646 
Tuning for Search Engines   
647 
More about Style Sheets for Printing   
648 
Pages for Mobile Devices 
649 
Blogs 
650
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested