convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Extract data from pdf using java SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML14-part751

110
Chapter 3
To understand the nesting 
relationships, draw a picture
title
head
body
html
p
q
Drawing the nesting of elements in a Web 
page is kind of like drawing a family tree. At 
the top you’ve got the great-grandparents, 
and then all their children and grandchildren 
below. Here’s an example...
<html> is always the 
element at the root of 
the tree.
Simple Web page.
<html> has two nested 
elements: <head> and <body>. 
You can call them both 
“children” of <html>.
The parent of <q> is <p>,  
the parent of <p> is <body>, the 
parent of <body> is <html>.
<title> is nested within the 
<head> element.
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Musings</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>
       To quote Buckaroo, 
       <q>The only reason 
          for time is so 
          that everything 
          doesn’t happen 
          at once.</q>
    </p>
  </body>
</html>
Let’s translate this into 
a diagram, where each 
element becomes a box, and 
each line connects the element 
to another element that is nested 
within it.
<body> is nested within the <html> 
element, so we say <body> is the “child” 
of <html>.
understanding nesting by drawing
Extract data from pdf using java - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
cannot save pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf into excel
Extract data from pdf using java - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to make pdf editable form reader; exporting pdf data to excel
building blocks
you are here 
111
Your first payoff for understanding how elements are nested is that 
you can avoid mismatching your tags.  (And there’s gonna be more 
payoff later, just wait.)
What does “mismatching your tags” mean and how could that 
happen? Take a look at this example:
<p>I’m so going to blog <em>this</em></p>
p
em
GOOD: here the <em> element is 
nested inside the <p>.
SAFETY FIRST
Properly 
nest  
your 
elements
Using nesting to make sure your tags match
So far, so good, but it’s also easy to get sloppy and write some HTML 
that looks more like this:
It’s okay to mess up your nesting if you like playing Russian roulette.  If you write HTML 
without properly nesting your elements, your pages may work on some browsers but not 
on others.  By keeping nesting in mind, you can avoid mismatching your tags and be sure 
that your HTML will work in all browsers. This is going to become even more important 
as we get more into “industrial strength HTML” in later chapters.
<p>I’m so going to blog <em>this</p></em>
p
em
p
em
Here’s how this HTML looks, 
<em> is nested inside <p>.
Given what you now know about nesting, you know the 
<em>
element 
needs to be nested fully within, or contained in, the 
<p>
element.
BAD: here the <em> element has leaked outside of the <p> 
element, which means it’s not properly nested inside it.
So what? 
WRONG: the <p> tag 
ends before the <em> 
tag!  The <em> element 
is supposed to be inside 
the <p> element.
Generate and draw Data Matrix for Java
correction is valid for all 2D barcodes like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in Download the Java Data Matrix Generation Package and extract the file.
extract data from pdf c#; can reader edit pdf forms
Generate and draw PDF 417 for Java
Error correction is valid for all 2D barcodes like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in Download the Java PDF 417 Generation Package and extract the file
pdf form save with reader; filling out pdf forms with reader
112
Chapter 3
Below, you’ll find an HTML file 
with some mismatched tags in it. 
Your job is to play like you’re the 
browser and locate all the errors. 
After you’ve done the 
exercise look at the 
end of the chapter to 
see if you caught all 
the errors.
BE the Browser
<html>
<head>
<title>Top 100</title>
<body>
<h1>Top 100
<h2>Dark Side of the Moon</h2>
<h3>Pink Floyd</h3>
<p>
There’s no dark side of the moon; matter of fact <q>it’s all dark.
</p></q>
<ul>
<li>Speak to Me / Breathe</li>
<li>On The Run</li>
<li>Time</li>
<li>The Great Gig in The Sky</li>
<li>Money</li>
<li>Us And Them</em>
<li>Any Colour You Like</li>
<li>Brain Damage</li>
<li>Eclipse</li>
</ul>
</p>
<h2>XandY</h3>
<h3>Coldplay</h2>
<ol>
<li>Square One
<li>What If?
<li>White Shadows
<li>Fix You
<li>Talk
<li>XandY
<li>Speed of Sound
<li>A Message
<li>Low
<li>Hardest Part
<li>Swallowed In The Sea
<li>Twisted Logic
</ul>
</body>
</head>
catching mismatched tags
C# PowerPoint: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from PowerPoint
support reading barcode image from PPT slide using VB.NET C# PowerPoint: Data Matrix Barcode Reader, C# PowerPoint C# PowerPoint: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C#
extract pdf form data to excel; extract data from pdf file to excel
Java Imaging SDK Library: Document Image Scan, Process, PDF
Using RasterEdge Java Image SDK, developers can easily open Gif, Png, Tiff, Jpeg2000, DICOM, JBIG2, PDF, MS Word 2D barcodes, including QR Code, Data Matrix Code
pdf data extraction open source; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
building blocks
you are here 
113
Who am I?
A bunch of HTML elements, in full costume, are playing a party 
game, “Who am I?” They’ll give you a clue – you try to guess who 
they are based on what they say. Assume they always tell the 
truth about themselves. Fill in the blanks to the right to identify 
the attendees. Also, for each attendee, write down whether or not 
the element is inline or block.
Tonight’s attendees:
Any of the charming HTML elements you’ve seen so far just 
might show up!
I’m the #1 heading.
I’m all ready to link to another page.
Emphasize text with me.
I’m a list, but I don’t have my affairs in order.
I’m an item that lives inside a list.
I’m a real linebreaker.
Name
Inline or 
block?
I keep my list items in order.
I’m all about image.
Quote inside a paragraph with me.
Use me to quote text that stands on its own.
Data Matrix .NET Windows Forms Bar Code Control
using Rasteredge.WinForms.Barcode; // construct a linear barcode Print Data Matrix Barcodes with .NET WinForms Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
pdf form field recognition; extract data from pdf to excel online
.NET Windows Forms GS1-128 Bar Code Control & SDK
a global standard for exchanging data between different using Rasteredge.WinForms. Barcode; // construct a linear Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
exporting data from excel to pdf form; how to save a pdf form in reader
114
Chapter 3
I was just creating a Web 
page explaining everything I was 
learning from this book, and I wanted 
to mention the <html> element inside 
my page. Isn’t that going to mess up 
the nesting? Do I need to put double 
quotes around it or something?
Because browsers use 
<
and 
>
to begin and end tags, using 
them in the content of your HTML can cause problems. 
But, HTML gives you an easy way to specify these and other 
special characters using a simple abbreviation called a character 
entity. Here’s how it works: for any character that is considered 
“special” or that you’d like to use in your Web page, but that 
may not be a typeable character in your editor (like a copyright 
symbol), you just look up the abbreviation and then type it into 
your HTML. For example, the 
>
character’s abbreviation is 
&gt; and the 
<
character’s is &lt;. 
So, say you wanted to type “The <html> element rocks.” in 
your page.  Using the character entities, you’d type this instead:
The &lt;html&gt; element rocks.
Another important special character you should know about 
is the 
&
character. If you’d like to have an 
&
in your HTML 
content, use the character entity &amp; instead of the 
&
character itself.
So what about the copyright symbol? And all those other 
symbols and foreign characters? You can look common ones 
up at this URL:
http://www.w3schools.com/tags/ref_entities.asp 
or, for a more exhaustive list, use this URL:
http://www.unicode.org/charts/ 
You’re right, that can cause problems.
character entities are for special characters
Data Matrix C#.NET Integration Tutorial
to print Data Matrix using C# BarCode datamatrix.generateBarcodeToByteArray(); //Generate Data Matrix barcodes & Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
vb extract data from pdf; c# read pdf form fields
Create Data Matrix with VB.NET, Data Matrix Bar Code Generating
Rasteredge.Barcode.DataMatrix class to generate Data Matrix barcodes by using VB.NET professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
fill in pdf form reader; how to type into a pdf form in reader
building blocks
you are here 
115
Q: 
Wow, I never knew the browser 
could display so many different 
characters.  There are a ton of different 
characters and languages at the  
www.unicode.org site.
A: 
Be careful. Your browser will 
only display all these characters if your 
computer or device has the appropriate 
fonts installed. So, while you can 
probably count on the basic entities 
from the www.w3schools.com page to 
be available on any browser, there is no 
guarantee that you can display all these 
entities. But, assuming you know  
 something about your users, you should 
have a good idea of what kind of foreign 
language characters are going to be 
common on their machine.
Q: 
You said that & is special and 
I need to use the entity &amp; in its 
place, but to type in any entity I have 
to use a &. So for, say, the > entity, do I 
need to type &amp;gt;?
A: 
No, no! The reason & is special is 
precisely because it is the first character 
of any entity. So, it’s perfectly fine to use 
& in your entity names, just not by itself.  
 Just remember to use & anytime you type 
in an entity, and if you really need an & in 
your content, use &amp; instead.
Q: 
When I looked up the entities 
at the www.w3cschools.com, I noticed 
that each entity has a number too. 
What do I use that for?
A: 
You can use either the number, 
like &#100 or the name of an entity in 
your HTML (they do the same thing). 
However, not all entities have names, so 
in those cases your only choice is to use 
the number.
there are no
Dumb Questions
Dr. Evel, in his quest for world domination, has put up a private Web page to be 
used by his evil henchmen. You’ve just received a snippet of intercepted HTML 
that may contain a clue to his whereabouts. Given your expert knowledge of 
HTML, you’ve been asked to crack the code and discover his location. Here’s a 
bit of the text from his home page:
Crack the Location Challenge
There’s going to be an evil henchman meetup 
next month at my underground lair in 
&#208;&epsilon;&tau;&#114;&ouml;&igrave;&tau;. 
Come join us.
Hint: visit http://www.w3schools.com/tags/ref_entities.asp and/or type  
in the HTML and see what your browser displays.
Data Matrix Web Server Control for ASP.NET
Server Control in IIS (without using Visual Studio Port/datamatrix/datamatrix.aspx? DATA=YourDatainDataMatrix NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
how to fill out pdf forms in reader; sign pdf form reader
PDF-417 Web Server Control for ASP.NET
PDF-417 Web Server Control in IIS (without using Visual Studio tag into your web pages <img src="http://YourDomain:Port/pdf417/pdf417.aspx?DATA=DatainPDF417
how to save pdf form data in reader; extract data from pdf forms
116
Chapter 3
Here’s a bunch of elements you 
already know, and a  
few you don’t.
Remember, half the fun of HTML 
is experimenting!  So make 
some files of your own and try 
these out.
<q>
<hr>
<ol>
<ul>
<blockquote>
<pre>
<code>
Use this element for short 
quotes... you know, like “to be or 
not to be”, or “No matter where 
you go, there you are.”
Use this element for 
formatted text when you want 
the browser to show your text 
exactly as you typed it.
Blockquote is for lengthy quotations.  
Something that you want to 
highlight as a longer passage, say, 
from a book.
The code element is used 
for displaying code from a 
computer program.
Need to display a list? Say, a list of 
ingredients in a recipe or a todo list?  Use 
the <ul> element.
If you need an ordered 
list instead, use the <ol> 
element.
<br>
An empty element for 
making linebreaks...
... and another one for 
making horizontal lines 
(called “horizontal 
rules”), like to start a 
new section without a 
heading.
<li>
For items in lists, 
like chocolate, hot 
chocolate, chocolate 
syrup ...
<a>
Whenever you want to make 
a link, you’ll need the <a> 
element.
<address>
This element tells the browser 
that the content is an address, 
like your contact info.
<p>
Just give me a 
paragraph, please.
<strong>Use this element to mark up 
text you want emphasized with 
extra strength.
<em>
Use this 
element to 
mark up text 
you want 
emphasized.
Element
Soup
tasting a few elements
building blocks
you are here 
117
Rockin’ page.  It’s perfect 
for my trip and it really does a 
good job of providing an online version 
of my journal.  You’ve got the HTML 
well-organized too, so I should be able 
to add new material myself. So, 
when can we actually get this off 
your computer and onto the 
Web?
Plan the structure of your Web pages before 
n
you start typing in the content.  Start with a 
sketch, then create an outline, and finally write 
the HTML.
Plan your page starting with the large, block 
n
elements, and then refine with inline elements.
Remember, whenever possible, use elements 
n
to tell the browser what your content means.  
Always use the 
n
element that most closely 
matches the meaning of your content. For 
example, never use a paragraph when you 
need a list.
<p>, <blockquote>, <ol>, <ul>, and <li> are all 
n
block elements.  They stand on their own and 
are displayed with space above and below the 
content within them.
<q>, <em>, and <a> are all inline elements.  
n
The content in these elements flows in line 
with the rest of the content in the containing 
element.
Use the <br> element when you need to insert 
n
your own linebreaks.
<br> is an “empty element.”
n
Empty elements have no content.
n
An empty element consists of only one tag.
n
A nested element is an element contained 
n
completely within another element.  If your 
elements are nested properly, all your tags will 
match correctly.
You make an HTML list using two elements in 
n
combination: use <ol> with <li> for an ordered 
list; use <ul> with <li> for an unordered list.
When 
n
the browser displays an ordered list, it 
creates the numbers for the list so you don’t 
have to. 
You can specify your own ordering in an 
n
ordered list with the start attribute.  To change 
the values of the individual items, use the 
value attribute.
You can build nested lists within lists by 
n
putting <ol> or <ul> elements inside your <li> 
elements.
Use entities for special characters in your 
n
HTML content.
BULLET POINTS
118
Chapter 3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Across
2. Block element for quotes.
7. Major building blocks of your pages.
9. Requires two elements.
10. Element without content.
11. <q> is this type of element.
13. Famous catchy road signs.
14. Tony's transportation.
15. Another empty tag.
Down
1. Left together in a T-Bird.
3. Use <ol> for these kinds of lists.
4. Empty elements have none.
5. Putting one element inside another is called this.
6. Use <ul> for these kinds of lists.
8. Max speed of Segway.
12. Tony won't be doing any of this.
HTMLcross
It’s time to give your right brain a break and put that left brain to work: all the words 
are HTML-related and from this chapter. 
left brain resting station
building blocks
you are here 
119
Okay, it doesn’t LOOK any 
different, but don’t you FEEL 
better now?
Here’s the rework of Tony’s Lao Tzu quote using the <q> element.  
Did you give your solution a test drive?
We’ve added the <q> opening tag 
before the start of the quote 
and the </q> closing tag at the 
very end.
Notice that we also  
removed the double quotes. 
<p>
My first day of the trip!  I can’t believe I finally got 
everything packed and ready to go.  Because I’m on a 
Segway, I wasn’t able to bring a whole lot with me: 
cellphone, iPod, digital camera, and a protein bar. Just 
the essentials.  As Lao Tzu would have said, <q>A journey 
of a thousand miles begins with one Segway.</q>
</p>
Here’s the part that changes...
And, here’s the test drive...
Exercise 
Solutions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested