convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Make pdf form editable in reader SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML2-part757

xxv
Intro
how to use this book 
I can’t believe 
they put 
that
in an  
HTML book!
In this section, we answer the burning question:            
“So, why DID they put that in an HTML book?”
Make pdf form editable in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
exporting pdf data to excel; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
Make pdf form editable in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to type into a pdf form in reader; extract pdf data into excel
how to use this book
xxvi
intro
Who is this book for ?
1
Do you have access to a computer with a Web browser 
and a text editor?
2
Do you want to learn, understand, and remember how 
to create
Web pages using the best techniques and the 
most recent standards?
this book is for you.
Who should probably back away from this book?
1
Are you completely new to computers?
(You don’t need to be advanced, but you should 
understand folders and files, simple text editing 
applications, and how to use a Web browser.)
3
this book is not for you.
Are you afraid to try something different?  Would 
you rather have a root canal than mix stripes with 
plaid? Do you believe that a technical book can’t be 
serious if HTML tags are anthropomorphized?
If you can answer “yes” to all of these:
If you can answer “yes” to any one of these:
2
Are you a kick-butt Web developer looking for a 
reference 
book?
[Note from marketing: this book is 
for anyone with a credit card.]
3
Do you prefer stimulating dinner party conversation 
to dry, dull, academic lectures?
If you have access to any 
computer manufactured 
in the last decade, the 
answer is yes.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
to convert target PDF document to other editable file formats should be noted here is that our PDF to text Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or
extract data from pdf c#; extract data from pdf form
VB.NET Image: Add Callout Annotation on Document and Image in VB.
document and image formats, such as PDF, Word, TIFF mainly contains two parts-that are editable text area guide that tells you how to make callout annotation
pdf data extraction to excel; extract data from pdf
the intro
you are here�
xxvii
“How can this be a serious book?”
“What’s with all the graphics?”
“Can I actually learn it this way?”
We know what you’re thinking.
Your brain craves novelty. It’s always searching, scanning, waiting for 
something unusual. It was built that way, and it helps you stay alive. 
Today, you’re less likely to be a tiger snack. But your brain’s still looking. 
You just never know.
So what does your brain do with all the routine, ordinary, normal things 
you encounter? Everything it can to stop them from interfering with the 
brain’s real job—recording things that matter.  It doesn’t bother saving the 
boring things; they never make it past the “this is obviously not important” 
filter.
How does your brain know what’s important? Suppose you’re out for a day 
hike and a tiger jumps in front of you, what happens inside your head and 
body? 
Neurons fire. Emotions crank up. Chemicals surge. 
And that’s how your brain knows...
This must be important! Don’t forget it!
But imagine you’re at home, or in a library. It’s a safe, warm, tiger-
free zone. You’re studying. Getting ready for an exam. Or trying to 
learn some tough technical topic your boss thinks will take a week, 
ten days at the most.
Just one problem. Your brain’s trying to do you a big favor. It’s trying 
to make sure that this obviously non-important content doesn’t clutter 
up scarce resources. Resources that are better spent storing the really 
big things. Like tigers. Like the danger of fire. Like how you should 
never again snowboard in shorts.
And there’s no simple way to tell your brain, “Hey brain, thank 
you very much, but no matter how dull this book is, and how little 
I’m registering on the emotional Richter scale right now, I really do 
want you to keep this stuff around.”
And we know what your
 brain 
is thinking.
Your brain thinks 
THIS is important.
Great. Only 
637 more dull, 
dry, boring pages.
Your brain thinks 
THIS isn’t worth 
saving.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable users will be able to convert a PDF file or Before you get started, please make sure that you
filling out pdf forms with reader; how to extract data from pdf file using java
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that
can reader edit pdf forms; how to make pdf editable form reader
how to use this book
xxviii
intro
We think of a “Head First” reader as a learner.
It really sucks to forget 
your <body> element.
Does it make sense to 
create a bathtub class for 
my style, or just to style 
the whole bathroom?
The head element is 
where you put things 
about your page.
So what does it take to 
learn 
something? First, you have to 
get 
it, then make sure 
you don’t 
forget
 it.  It’s not about pushing facts into your head. Based on the 
latest research in cognitive science, neurobiology, and educational psychology, 
learning 
takes a lot more than text on a page. We know what turns your brain on.
Some of the Head First learning principles:
Make it visual. Images are far more memorable than words alone, 
and make learning much more effective (up to 89% improvement in 
recall and transfer studies). It also makes things more understandable.  
Put the words within or near the graphics they relate to, 
rather than on the bottom or on another page, and learners will be 
up to twice as likely to solve problems related to the content.  
Use a conversational and personalized style. In recent 
studies, students performed up to 40% better on post-learning tests if the content 
spoke directly to the reader, using a first-person, conversational style rather than 
taking a formal tone. Tell stories instead of lecturing. Use casual language. Don’t 
take yourself too seriously. Which would you pay more attention to: a stimulating 
dinner party companion, or a lecture?
Get the learner to think more deeply. In other words, unless 
you actively flex your neurons, nothing much happens in your head.  
A reader has to be motivated, engaged, curious, and inspired to 
solve problems, draw conclusions, and generate new knowledge. 
And for that, you need challenges, exercises, and thought-provoking 
questions, and activities that involve both sides of the brain, 
and multiple senses.
Get—and keep—the reader’s attention.  We’ve 
all had the “I really want to learn this but I can’t stay awake past 
page one” experience.  Your brain pays attention to things that 
are out of the ordinary, interesting, strange, eye-catching, unexpected.   
Learning a new, tough, technical topic doesn’t have to be boring. Your brain will 
learn much more quickly if it’s not.
Touch their emotions. We now know that your ability to remember something is largely 
dependent on its emotional content.  You remember what you care about.  You remember when 
you feel something. No, we’re not talking heart-wrenching stories about a boy and his dog.    We’re 
talking emotions like surprise, curiosity, fun, “what the...?” , and the feeling of   “I Rule!” that comes 
when you solve a puzzle, learn something everybody else thinks is hard, or realize you know 
something that “I’m more technical than thou” Bob from engineering doesn’t. 
Browsers make requests for HTML 
pages or other resources, like images.
“Found it, here ya go”
Web Server
VB.NET Excel: How to Covert Excel Doc to PDF in VB.NET Application
document is not editable and the Excel document is editable. So when using Excel or PDF document on your for VB.NET programming, you need to make sure whether
extract data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf table
Process Multipage TIFF Images in Web Image Viewer| Online
Export multi-page TIFF image to a PDF; More image viewing & multipage TIFF files in Web Document Viewer, make sure that Load, Save an Editable Multi-page TIFF.
how to save a pdf form in reader; extract table data from pdf to excel
the intro
you are here�
xxix
If you really want to learn, and you want to learn more quickly and more deeply, 
pay attention to how you pay attention. Think about how you think. Learn how you 
learn.
Most of us did not take courses on metacognition or learning theory when we were 
growing up. We were expected to learn, but rarely taught how to learn.
But we assume that if you’re holding this book, you really want to learn 
how to create Web pages. And you probably don’t want to spend a lot of 
time. And you want to remember what you read, and be able to apply it. 
And for that, you’ve got to understand it. To get the most from this book, 
or any book or learning experience, take responsibility for your brain. 
Your brain on this content. 
The trick is to get your brain to see the new material you’re learning as 
Really Important. Crucial to your well-being. As important as a tiger. 
Otherwise, you’re in for a constant battle, with your brain doing its best 
to keep the new content from sticking.
Metacognition: thinking about thinking
I wonder how I 
can trick my brain 
into remembering 
this stuff...
So how 
DO 
you get your brain to think HTML & CSS 
are as important as a tiger?
There’s the slow, tedious way, or the faster, more effective way. The 
slow way is about sheer repetition. You obviously know that you are 
able to learn and remember even the dullest of topics, if you keep pounding on the same 
thing. With enough repetition, your brain says, “This doesn’t feel important to him, but he 
keeps looking at the same thing over and over and over, so I suppose it must be.”
The faster way is to do anything that increases brain activity, especially different 
types of brain activity. The things on the previous page are a big part of the solution, 
and they’re all things that have been proven to help your brain work in your favor. For 
example, studies show that putting words within the pictures they describe (as opposed to 
somewhere else in the page, like a caption or in the body text) causes your brain to try 
to make sense of how the words and picture relate, and this causes more neurons to fire. 
More neurons firing = more chances for your brain to get that this is something worth 
paying attention to, and possibly recording.
A conversational style helps because people tend to pay more attention when they 
perceive that they’re in a conversation, since they’re expected to follow along and hold up 
their end. The amazing thing is, your brain doesn’t necessarily care that the “conversation” 
is between you and a book! On the other hand, if the writing style is formal and dry, your 
brain perceives it the same way you experience being lectured to while sitting in a roomful 
of passive attendees. No need to stay awake.
But pictures and conversational style are just the beginning.
VB.NET TIFF: Convert TIFF to HTML Web Page Using VB.NET TIFF
information of TIFF file in a more editable file format This online article aims to make a detailed instruction on to HTML converters, like VB.NET PDF to HTML
extract data from pdf file; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
VB.NET Image: Barcode Generator to Add UPC-A to Image, TIFF, PDF &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-a.pdf", New PDFEncoder document, but also we can make a UPC A barcode imaging properties from the following parameter form.
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; extracting data from pdf files
how to use this book
xxx
intro
We used pictures, because your brain is tuned for visuals, not text. As far as your brain’s 
concerned, a picture really is worth 1024 words. And when text and pictures work together, we 
embedded the text in the pictures because your brain works more effectively when the text is 
within the thing the text refers to, as opposed to in a caption or buried in the text somewhere.
We used redundancy, saying the same thing in different ways and with different media types, 
and multiple senses, to increase the chance that the content gets coded into more than one area of 
your brain. 
We used concepts and pictures in unexpected ways because your brain is tuned for novelty, 
and we used pictures and ideas with at least some emotional content, because your brain is 
tuned to pay attention to the biochemistry of emotions. That which causes you to feel something 
is more likely to be remembered, even if that feeling is nothing more than a little humor, 
surprise, or interest.
We used a personalized, conversational style, because your brain is tuned to pay more 
attention when it believes you’re in a conversation than if it thinks you’re passively listening to a 
presentation. Your brain does this even when you’re reading.
We included more than 100 activities, because your brain is tuned to learn and remember 
more when you do things than when you read about things. And we made the exercises 
challenging-yet-do-able, because that’s what most people prefer.
We used multiple learning styles, because you might prefer step-by-step procedures, while 
someone else wants to understand the big picture first, while someone else just wants to see a 
code example. But regardless of your own learning preference, everyone benefits from seeing the 
same content represented in multiple ways.
We include content for both sides of your brain, because the more of your brain you 
engage, the more likely you are to learn and remember, and the longer you can stay focused. 
Since working one side of the brain often means giving the other side a chance to rest, you can 
be more productive at learning for a longer period of time. 
And we included stories and exercises that present more than one point of view, because 
your brain is tuned to learn more deeply when it’s forced to make evaluations and judgements. 
We included challenges, with exercises, and by asking questions that don’t always have 
a straight answer, because your brain is tuned to learn and remember when it has to work at 
something. Think about it—you can’t get your body in shape just by watching people at the gym. 
But we did our best to make sure that when you’re working hard, it’s on the right things. That 
you’re not spending one extra dendrite processing a hard-to-understand example, or 
parsing difficult, jargon-laden, or overly terse text.
We used people. In stories, examples, pictures, etc., because, well, because you’re a person. And 
your brain pays more attention to people than it does to things. 
We used an 80/20 approach. We assume that if you’re going to be a kick-butt Web developer, 
this won’t be your only book. So we don’t talk about everything. Just the stuff you’ll actually need.
Here’s what WE did:
BULLET POINTS
Puzzles
Be the Browser
body
html
h1
h2
p
p
img
a
em
a
p
the intro
you are here�
xxxi
So, we did our part. The rest is up to you. These tips are a 
starting point; listen to your brain and figure out what works 
for you and what doesn’t.    Try new things.
Here’s what YOU can do to bend 
your brain into submission
1
Slow down. The more you understand, 
the less you have to memorize.
Don’t just read. Stop and think. When the 
book asks you a question, don’t just skip to the 
answer. Imagine that someone really is asking 
the question. The more deeply you force your 
brain to think, the better chance you have of 
learning and remembering.
2
Do the exercises. Write your own notes.
We put them in, but if we did them for you, 
that would be like having someone else do 
your workouts for you. And don’t just look at 
the exercises. Use a pencil. There’s plenty of 
evidence that physical activity 
while 
learning 
can increase the learning. 
3
Read the “There are No Dumb Questions”
That means all of them. They’re not optional 
sidebars—they’re part of the core content! 
Don’t skip them.
4
Make this the last thing you read before 
bed. Or at least the last 
challenging 
thing.
Part of the learning (especially the transfer to 
long-term memory) happens 
after 
you put the 
book down. Your brain needs time on its own, to 
do more processing. If you put in something new 
during that processing-time, some of what you 
just learned will be lost. 
5
Drink water. Lots of it.
Your brain works best in a nice bath of fluid. 
Dehydration (which can happen before you ever 
feel thirsty) decreases cognitive function. 
6
Talk about it. Out loud.
Speaking activates a different part of the brain. 
If you’re trying to understand something, or 
increase your chance of remembering it later, say 
it out loud. Better still, try to explain it out loud 
to someone else. You’ll learn more quickly, and 
you might uncover ideas you hadn’t known were 
there when you were reading about it.
7
Listen to your brain.
Pay attention to whether your brain is getting 
overloaded. If you find yourself starting to skim the 
surface or forget what you just read, it’s time for a 
break. Once you go past a certain point, you won’t 
learn faster by trying to shove more in, and you 
might even hurt the process.
9
Create
something!
Apply this to something new you’re designing, or 
rework an older project. Just do something to get some 
experience beyond the exercises and activities in 
this book. All you need is a pencil and a problem 
to solve... a problem that might benefit from using 
HTML and CSS. 
cut this out and stick it 
on your refrigerator.
8
Feel
something!
Your brain needs to know that this matters. Get 
involved with the stories. Make up your own 
captions for the photos. Groaning over a bad joke is 
still better than feeling nothing at all.
xxxii
intro
Re ad Me
how to use this book
This is a learning experience, not a reference book. We deliberately stripped out 
everything that might get in the way of learning whatever it is we’re working on at that 
point in the book. And the first time through, you need to begin at the beginning, because 
the book makes assumptions about what you’ve already seen and learned.
We begin by teaching basic HTML, then standards-based HTML 
4.01, and then on to XHTML. 
To write standards-based HTML or XHTML, there are a lot of technical details you 
need to understand that aren’t helpful when you’re trying to learn the basics of HTML. 
Our approach is to have you learn the basic concepts of HTML first (without worrying 
about these details), and then, when you have a solid understanding of HTML, teach you 
to write standards compliant HTML and XHTML. This has the added benefit that the 
technical details are more meaningful after you’ve already learned the basics.  
It’s also important that you be writing compliant HTML or XHTML when you start 
using CSS,  so, we make a point of getting you to standards-based HTML and XHTML 
before you begin any serious work with CSS.
We don’t cover every single HTML element or attribute or CSS 
property ever created.
There are a lot of HTML elements, a lot of attributes, and a lot of CSS properties.  Sure, 
they’re all interesting, but our goal was to write a book that weighs less than the person 
reading it, so we don’t cover them all here. Our focus is on the core HTML elements and 
CSS properties that matter to you, the beginner, and making sure that you really, truly, 
deeply understand how and when to use them. In any case, once you’re done with Head 
First HTML & CSS, you’ll be able to pick up any reference book and get up to speed 
quickly on all the elements and properties we left out.
This book advocates a clean separation between the structure of 
your pages and the presentation of your pages.
Today, serious Web pages use HTML and XHTML to structure their content, and 
CSS for style and presentation. 1990s-era pages often used a different model, one where 
HTML was used for both structure and style. This book teaches you to use HTML for 
structure and CSS for style; we see no reason to teach you out-dated bad habits. 
We encourage you to use more than one browser with this book.
While we teach you to write HTML, CSS, and XHTML that is based on standards, you’ll 
still (and probably always) encounter minor differences in the way Web browsers display 
the intro
you are here�
xxxiii
pages. So, we encourage you to pick at least two up-to-date browsers and test your pages 
using them. This will give you experience in seeing the differences among browsers and in 
creating pages that work well in a variety of browsers.  
We often use tag names for element names. 
Rather than saying “the a element”, or “the ‘a’ element”, we use a tag name, like “the 
<a>
element”. While this may not be technically correct (because 
<a>
is an opening tag, not a 
full blown element), it does make the text more readable, and we always follow the name 
with the word “element” to avoid confusion. 
The activities are NOT optional. 
The exercises and activities are not add-ons; they’re part of the core content of the book. 
Some of them are to help with memory, some are for understanding, and some will help 
you apply what you’ve learned. Don’t skip the exercises. The crossword puzzles are the 
only things you don’t have to do, but they’re good for giving your brain a chance to think 
about the words in a different context.
The redundancy is intentional and important. 
One distinct difference in a Head First book is that we want you to really get it. And we want 
you to finish the book remembering what you’ve learned. Most reference books don’t have 
retention and recall as a goal, but this book is about learning, so you’ll see some of the same 
concepts come up more than once. 
The examples are as lean as possible.
Our readers tell us that it’s frustrating to wade through 200 lines of an example looking for 
the two lines they need to understand. Most examples in this book are shown within the 
smallest possible context, so that the part you’re trying to learn is clear and simple. Don’t 
expect all of the examples to be robust, or even complete—they are written specifically for 
learning, and aren’t always fully-functional. 
We’ve placed all the example files on the Web so you can download them.  You’ll find them 
at 
http://www.headfirstlabs.com/books/hfhtml/
The ‘Brain Power’ exercises don’t have answers.
For some of them, there is no right answer, and for others, part of the learning experience 
of the Brain Power activities is for you to decide if and when your answers are right.  In 
some of the Brain Power exercises you will find hints to point you in the right direction.
xxxiv
intro
Tech Reviewers
the review team
Fearless leader 
of the Extreme 
Review Team.
Johannes de Jong
Lousie Barr
Barney Marispini
Ike Van Atta
Valentin Crettaz
Our reviewers:
We’re extremely grateful for our technical review team. 
Johannes de Jong 
organized and led the whole effort, acted as “series dad,” and made it all 
work smoothly. 
Pauline McNamara
, “co-manager” of the effort, held 
things together and was the first to point out when our examples were a little 
more “baby boomer” than hip. The whole team proved how much we needed 
their technical expertise and attention to detail. Valentin Crettaz, Barney 
Marispini, Marcus Green, Ike Van Atta, David O’Meara, Joe Konior, and 
Corey McGlone left no stone unturned in their review and the book is a much 
better book for it. You guys rock! And further thanks to Corey and Pauline for 
never letting us slide on our often too formal (or we should just say it, incorrect) 
punctuation. A shout out to JavaRanch as well for hosting the whole thing.
A big thanks to Louise Barr, our token Web designer, who kept us honest on our 
designs and on our use of XHTML & CSS (although you’ll have to blame us for 
the actual designs).
Corey McGlone
Marcus Green
Joe Konior
Pauline McNamara
David O’Meara
Pauline gets the “kick 
ass reviewer” award.
Eiffel Tower
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested