convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : How to fill out pdf forms in reader software control dll winforms web page asp.net web forms Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML25-part763

adding images to your web pages
you are here 
221
I
1
Q
2
P
3
I
X
E
L
4
U
O
O
I
5
M
A
G
E
T
6
D
N
L
R
G
7
I
F
I
A
E
A
8
T
P
9
N
G
C
10
O
N
C
U
R
R
E
N
T
L
Y
S
T
P
T
11
H
I
R
T
Y
F
I
V
E
J
12
A
A
P
R
T
13
H
U
M
B
N
A
I
L
S
R
14
E
S
I
Z
E
I
G
N
A
C
A
15
C
C
E
S
S
I
B
I
L
I
T
Y
Across
3. Smallest element on a screen. [pixel] 
5. Web server makes a request for each one of 
these. [image] 
7. Better for solid colors, lines, and small text. 
[GIF] 
9. Newcomer image format. [png] 
10. Most Web servers retrieve images this way. 
[concurrently] 
11. Miles you can draw with a pencil. [thirtyfive] 
13. Small images on a page. [thumbnails] 
Down
1. Lovable MP3 player. [ipod] 
2. With JPEG you can control this. [quality] 
4. The larger the image, the _____ it takes to 
transfer it. [longer] 
6. GIF has it, JPEG doesn't. [transparency] 
8. Technique for softening edges of text. 
[antialias] 
12. Better for photos with continuous tones. 
[JPEG] 
Exercise 
Solutions
Here’s how you add the image “seattle.jpg” to the file “index.html”.
<h2>Seattle, Washington</h2>
<p>
Me and my iPod in Seattle!  You can see rain clouds and the 
Space Needle.   You can’t see the 628 coffee shops.
</p>
<p>
<img src=”photos/seattle.jpg” alt=”My iPod in Seattle, WA”>
</p>
Sharpen your pencil
How to fill out pdf forms in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
change font size pdf form reader; extract data from pdf c#
How to fill out pdf forms in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
save pdf forms in reader; save data in pdf form reader
this is a new chapter
223
Serious HTML
  
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
What else is there to know about HTML?  
You’re well on your way to 
mastering HTML. In fact, isn’t it about time we move on to CSS and learn how to make 
all this bland markup look fabulous? Before we do, we need to make sure your HTML is 
really tight (you know... buttoned up, ship shape, nailed down) and we’re going to do that 
by getting serious about the way we write our HTML. Don’t get us wrong, you’ve been 
writing first-class HTML all along, but there’s a few things you can do to help the browser 
faithfully display your pages and to make sure that little mistakes don’t creep into your 
markup. What’s in it for you? Pages that display more uniformly across browsers (and 
even display well on mobile devices and screen readers for the visually impaired), pages 
that load faster, and pages that are guaranteed to play well with CSS. Get ready, this is 
the chapter where you move from Web tinkerer to Web professional.
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
enable users the ability to fill in PDF forms in Visual C# in form field in specified position of adobe PDF file. Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET.
how to fill in a pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf forms
VB.NET TIFF: Make Custom Annotations on TIFF Image File in VB.NET
This online guide content is Out Dated! into one image that can be output as a PDF or any color 'set the property of filled shape obj.Fill = New AnnotationBrush
extract data from pdf into excel; how to flatten a pdf form in reader
224
Chapter 6
Jim: Button up? 
Frank: You know, make sure it meets the HTML 
“standards.”
Jim:  Our HTML is just fine... here, look at it in the 
browser.  It looks beautiful.  We’re a careful bunch.  We 
know how to correctly form our elements.  
Joe: Yeah, that’s what I think... they’re just trying to give 
us another thing to worry about.  Standards, schmandards.  
We know what we’re doing. 
Frank:  Actually guys, I hate to admit it but I think the 
boss is right on this one.
Jim, Joe: Huh?!
Joe:  Come on, this is just going to mean even more work.  
We’ve already got enough to do.
Frank:  Guys, what I’m saying is that I think this will help 
us do less work in the future.
Joe:  Ha!  This should be good...
Frank: Okay, here goes: the browser reads our HTML 
and then does its best to display it, right?  In fact, browsers 
are pretty forgiving... you can have a few mistakes here 
and there, or use HTML incorrectly – like putting a block 
element accidentally inside an inline element – and the 
browser tries to do the right thing.
Jim:  Yeah, and?
Hey guys, the 
boss just sent an email. 
Before we move Head First 
Lounge to CSS, he wants us to 
button up our HTML.
Jim
Joe
Frank
writing standard html
C# PDF: Use C# Code to Add Watermark to PDF Document
This online guide content is Out Dated! Fill.FillType = FillType.Solid; anno.Fill.Solid_Color = new AddAnnotation(anno); doc.Save(@"c:\annotatedSample.pdf");
online form pdf output; flatten pdf form in reader
VB.NET Image: How to Draw and Cutomize Text Annotation on Image
document files in VB.NET, including PDF, TIFF & adopt these APIs to work out more advanced As AnnotationBrush, outline As AnnotationPen, fill As AnnotationBrush
export excel to pdf form; how to save editable pdf form in reader
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
225
Frank:  But different browsers (say Internet Explorer versus Firefox versus 
Safari) have different ways of handling imperfect HTML. In other words, if you 
have mistakes in your HTML, then all bets are off in terms of how your pages 
will look in different browsers.  It’s only when you don’t have mistakes that most 
browsers display things consistently.  And when we start adding presentation to 
our HTML with CSS, the differences will get even more dramatic if our HTML 
isn’t up to snuff. 
So, by making sure we’re, as they say, “compliant” with the “standards,” we’ll 
have a lot fewer problems with our pages displaying incorrectly for our customers.
Jim:  If that reduces the number of 3 a.m. calls I get, then that sounds like a 
good idea to me.  After all, our customers use every browser under the sun.
Joe: Wait a sec, I still don’t get it.  Aren’t we compliant now?  What’s wrong with 
our HTML?
Frank:  Maybe nothing, but there are a few things we can to do to make sure.   
Joe: Like what?
Frank:  Well, we can start by helping the browser a bit by telling it exactly which 
version of HTML we’re using.    
Joe: I’m not even sure I know which version we’re using.
Frank: Ah ha!  So there is some room for improvement here.  Okay, let’s begin 
by figuring out which version of HTML we’re using and how we can tell the 
browser about it.  There are a few other things we need to do too, but don’t worry, 
this isn’t a big deal.  And, when we’re done, life will be much easier when we start 
using CSS.
Browsers all do a pretty good job of consistently displaying your pages 
when you write correct HTML, but when you make mistakes or do 
nonstandard things in your HTML, pages are often displayed differently 
from one browser to another. Why do you think that is the case?
brain
power
?
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
Image viewers fill a vital part in document image viewing viewer are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and Zoom in and out image for best displaying effect
extracting data from pdf forms; pdf form data extraction
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add Rectangle Annotation to Images &
Add-on successfully stands itself out from other set filled shape style obj.Fill.Solid_Color = Color powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
pdf data extractor; extract data from pdf form
226
Chapter 6
A Brief History of HTML
HTML 1.0-2.0
HTML 3
These were the early days; 
you could fit everything 
there was to know about 
HTML into the back of 
your car. Pages weren’t 
pretty, but at least they 
were hypertext enabled. 
No one cared much about 
presentation, and just 
about everyone on the 
Web had their very own 
“home page.”  Even a count 
of the number of pencils, 
paperclips, and Post-it 
notes on your desk was 
considered “Web content” 
back then (you think we’re 
kidding).
The long, cold days of the 
“Browser Wars.” Netscape 
and Microsoft were duking 
it out for control of the 
world. After all, he who 
controls the browser 
controls the Universe, 
right? 
At the center of the fallout 
was the Web developer. 
During the wars, an 
arms race emerged as 
each browser company 
kept adding their own 
proprietary extensions in 
order to stay ahead. Who 
could keep up? And not 
only that, back in those 
days, you had to often write 
two
separate Web pages: 
one for the Netscape 
browser and one for 
Internet Explorer. Not good.
Ahhh... the end of the 
Browser Wars and, to 
our rescue, the World 
Wide Web Consortium 
(nickname: W3C). Their 
plan: to bring order to the 
Universe by creating the 
ONE HTML “standard” to 
rule them all. 
The key to their plan? 
Separate HTML’s structure 
and presentation into two 
languages – a language for 
structure (HTML 4.0) and a 
language for presentation 
(CSS) – and convince the 
browser makers it was in 
their best interest to adopt 
these standards.
But did their plan work?
Uh, almost... with a few 
changes (see HTML 4.01).
HTML 4
1989 1991
1995
1998
html timeline
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
This online guide content is Out Dated! drawing.Font.Size = 6 drawing.Fill = new DrawingBrush provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf data extraction tool; pdf data extraction open source
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Online Demo See the PDF SDK for .NET in action and check how much they can do for you. Check out the prices.
make pdf form editable in reader; how to make pdf editable form reader
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
227
Ah, the good life. HTML 4.01 
entered the scene in 1999, 
and is the most current 
version of HTML.  While 
everyone hoped 4.0 would be 
the ONE, it’s always the case 
that a few fixes are needed 
here and there. No biggies 
and nothing to worry about. 
Compared to the early days 
of HTML (when we all had 
to walk barefoot in 6 feet of 
snow, uphill both ways), we 
were all cruising along writing 
HTML 4.01 and sleeping well 
at night knowing that almost 
all browsers (at least the ones 
anyone would care about) are 
going to display your content 
just fine.
HTML 4.01
1999
????
And what will happen 
in the future? Will we 
all be going to work 
in flying cars and 
swallowing nutrition 
pills for dinner? Keep 
reading to find out.
2000
Starting in Chapter 7, 
our goal is to be faithful 
to XHTML 1.0. As 
always, the world keeps 
moving, so we’ll also talk 
later in the book about 
where things are going.
But, of course, just as we 
were all getting comfortable, 
new technologies were 
created and things changed.  
HTML and another markup 
language known as XML 
got together, and sooner 
than you can say “arranged 
marriage,” XHTML 1.0 was 
born.  XHTML inherited traits 
from both parents: popularity 
and browser-friendliness from 
HTML, and extensibility and 
strictness from XML.  What 
does that mean?  You’ll find 
out soon enough, because 
we’re going to have you 
creating XHTML Web 
pages before you can say 
“Extensible Hypertext Markup 
Language.” Well, at least in 
the next chapter.
XHTML 1.0
Our goal in this chapter is to 
get ourselves up to HTML 4.01.
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Imaging SDK, Insert & Add New TIFF Page Using VB
File Page. "This online guide content is Out Dated blank TIFF page, you need to fill this TIFF provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract data from pdf to excel; how to extract data from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order PDFDocument instance contains all documentation features and information that forms a PDF document
edit pdf form in reader; java read pdf form fields
228
Chapter 6
Head First:  We’re glad to have you here, Browser. 
As you know, “HTML versions” have become a 
popular issue. What’s the deal with that? You’re a 
Web browser after all. I give you HTML and you 
display it the best you can.
Browser:  Being a browser is tough these days... 
there are a lot of Web pages out there and many are 
written with old versions of HTML or with mistakes 
in their markup.  Like you said, my job is to try to 
display every single one of those pages, no matter 
what.
Head First:  So what’s the big deal?  What does it 
really matter which version of HTML I use?
Browser:  Remember the browser wars?  All kinds 
of elements were added to HTML that we aren’t 
supposed to use anymore.  But some people expect us 
browsers to be able to display them anyway, and we 
don’t always agree on how that should be done.
Head First: Why aren’t we supposed to use those 
elements any more?
Browser: Well, before CSS was invented, HTML 
had elements that were there for presentation, not 
structure.  Now, with CSS, we don’t need those 
anymore, but there are still plenty of Web pages out 
there that use them.
Head First:  I think I’m starting to see the problem.  
So how do you manage to display all these pages in 
all these different versions of HTML?  That’s quite a 
tall order. 
Browser:  Yeah, like I said, it’s tough being a 
browser.  What we end up doing is having two sets of 
rules for displaying Web pages: one for old HTML 
and one for the newer, standard HTML. When I use 
the old rules, I call that my “quirks mode” because 
there are so many weird things that can happen on 
those pages.
Head First:  That sounds like a pretty good 
solution to me... 
Browser:  Well, it can get you into trouble, though.  
If you’re writing new HTML, but you don’t tell me 
you’re writing new HTML, then I have to assume 
you’re writing old HTML, and go into quirks mode 
just in case. And you don’t want that.
Head First:  What do you mean?
Browser:  Not all browsers agree on how to display 
the older stuff, but we all do a pretty consistent job 
with standard HTML. So if you’re using standard 
HTML, tell me and you’ll get more consistent results 
in all browsers.
Head First:  Oh, so you can end up using the 
quirks mode rules on the pages written using new 
HTML?
Browser:  Exactly.  If I don’t know you’re writing 
new HTML, I go into my quirks mode and do the 
best I can.  But, you don’t want that because all those 
“quirks” mean that your pages might end up looking 
a bit off, when they could have looked beautiful if I’d 
only known you were using new HTML.
Head First:  Ahh.  So, what’s the solution to this 
mess?  We definitely want our Web pages to look 
good.
Browser:  Easy.  Tell me up front which version of 
HTML you’re using.  That way I know which rules 
to use to display your page.  
Head First:  Got it.  Thank you, Browser!
This week’s interview:
Why do you care which version 
of HTML you’re displaying?
The Browser Exposed
browsers and quirks mode
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
229
We can’t have your pages putting 
the browser into Quirks Mode!
We’ll all be better off for telling the browser up front: “Hey, we’re 
an HTML page that gets it.  We’re standards compliant. This is 
HTML 4.01, baby!” 
When you do that, the browser knows exactly how to handle your 
page and (at least on any browser you’d care about) the page is 
going to display as you’d expect.
So, how do you tell the browser? Easy, you just add one line to the 
top of your HTML files. Here’s what the line looks like:
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN” 
“http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd”>
Notice that this is NOT an HTML 
element.  It has a “!” after the “<” 
at the beginning, which tells you this 
is something different.
This is all tricky to type in with all the slashes, quotes, and so on. So 
instead of typing it in, you can copy and paste this text from the file 
“doctype.txt”.  You’ll find this file in the “chapter6” folder when you 
download the files for the book from the headfirstlabs.com Web site.
Tells the browser this is 
specifying a document 
type for this page.
You can type this all on 
one line, or if you want, 
you can add a return 
where we did. Just 
make sure you only press 
return in between the 
parts in the quotes.
Okay, we know that is one butt ugly line, but keep in mind, it is 
written for your browser, not you. This line is called a document type 
definition because it tells the browser the type of the document, and in 
this case, the document is your HTML page. Let’s just take a quick 
peek at this line to get a feel for it. But again, this is browser speak, 
not something you need to know well or memorize. Just throw it in 
the top of your HTML and you’re ready to go.
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN” “http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd”>
This means 
that <html> 
is the root 
(first) element 
in your page.
This points to a file that identifies 
this particular standard.
This part says we’re using 
HTML version 4.01 and 
that HTML markup is 
written in English.
This just means 
the HTML 
4.01 standard 
is publicly 
available.
We’ll talk 
more about 
the word 
transitional 
in a bit....
230
Chapter 6
Q: 
What exactly do you mean when you say we’re 
“compliant,” or that we’re writing “standard HTML?”
A: 
“Standard HTML” just means the version of HTML that 
everyone has agreed is “the standard,” and right now that is HTML 
4.01.  
Being compliant is just another way of saying your pages meet the 
standard. 
Q: 
And why should I care about standard HTML, or about 
making my pages compliant? They look fine to me.
A: 
Do you really want to go to all the trouble of writing Web 
pages and then styling them with CSS, only to have them display 
inconsistently (which is another way of saying “display badly”) in 
some browsers? By making them compliant, you’re assuring that 
your pages are going to display as consistently as possible in a 
variety of browsers.
Q: 
How do I make sure my pages are compliant, then?
A: 
You need to do a couple of things, which we’re going to go 
through, but we’re also going to make use of a freely available tool 
on the Web that checks your pages to make sure they’re compliant.
Q: 
So, we’re calling HTML 4.01 the standard?
A: 
Yes, HTML 4.01 is the HTML standard most widely supported 
by browsers. The Web keeps moving ahead, though, so we’ll talk in 
the very next chapter about what’s new in the standards world.
Q: 
What happens when there is an HTML 5?
A: 
Good question.  It’s likely that there won’t be an HTML 5 
because the new standard for writing Web pages is XHTML.  You’re 
going to learn all about XHTML in the next chapter.  The good news  
is that you’re already in great shape to use either HTML 4.01 or  
XHTML, so no matter which standard you choose, it will be easy for 
you to write Web pages based on what you’ve learned so far.
Q: 
Let me get this straight: if I throw the document type 
definition in the top of my HTML file, then the browser sees it 
and can make certain assumptions about my HTML, which is a 
good thing?
A: 
That’s right.  The document type definition tells your browser, 
“I’m using HTML 4.01.”   When the browser sees that, it assumes 
you know what you’re talking about and that you 
really
 are writing 
HTML 4.01.  That’s good because the browser will use the layout 
and display rules for HTML 4.01, and not use quirks mode. 
Q: 
What if I tell the browser I’m using HTML 4.01, and I’m 
not?
A: 
The browser will figure out that you’re not really writing 
HTML 4.01 and go back to quirks mode.  And then you’re back to the 
problem of having the various browsers handle your page in different 
ways. The only way you can get predictable results is to tell the 
browser you’re using “HTML 4.01” and to actually do so.
Q: 
I really don’t have to worry about what’s in the document 
type line? Just throw it on my page?
A: 
Yup, that’s pretty much the case. Although there is one 
gotcha: there are a few different document types you might want to 
know about and we’re going to talk about another one of those in 
just a sec. But, in terms of using the document type, just throw it in 
the top of your file. Once you’ve got the DOCTYPE in there, no one 
worries on a daily basis about what it has in it.
Q: 
The word “transitional” in that document type worries 
me a bit. I thought this was a standard, but it sounds less than 
standard if it is “transitional.”
A: 
 Good catch, and you’ve got good instincts. If you’ll hold on a 
few pages we’ll get to the bottom of that question.
there are no
Dumb Questions
html, standards, and document types
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
231
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN” 
“http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd”>
<html>
<head>
<title>Head First Lounge</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Welcome to the New and Improved Head First Lounge</h1>
<img src=”drinks.gif”>
<p>
Join us any evening for refreshing 
<a href=”elixir.html”>
elixirs</a>
conversation and maybe a game or two 
of <em>Dance Dance Revolution</em>.  
Wireless access is always provided;  
BYOWS (Bring Your Own Web Server).
</p>
<h2>Directions</h2>
<p>
You’ll find us right in the center of downtown 
Webville.   If you need help finding us, check out our 
<a href=”directions.html”>
detailed directions</a>
Come join us!
</p>
</body>
</html>
Adding the document type definition
Enough talk, let’s get that DOCTYPE in the HTML. You can attempt 
to type it in yourself (we hope you have really good eyes), or you can 
copy and paste it from the file “doctype.txt” in the “chapter6” folder.  
Remember, you can type it all on one line, or 
you can hit return between the quoted parts 
like we’ve done here.
Okay, I think we’ve got 
it now. Let’s get that 
DOCTYPE in the lounge files.
Here’s the 
DOCTYPE line. Just 
add it as the very 
first thing in the 
“lounge.html” file.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested