convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Extract data from pdf table Library control class asp.net azure web page ajax Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML28-part766

252
Chapter 6
You’ve been in Webville for a few chapters now.  Don’t you think it’s about time you 
learn the local rules of the road? Luckily, Webville has prepared a handy guide to 
using strict HTML 4.01. This guide is meant for you  –  someone who is new to 
Webville.  It isn’t an exhaustive reference, but rather focuses on the more important 
common sense rules of the road. And you’ll definitely be adding to the knowledge in 
this guide as you get to know your way around Webville in coming chapters. But for 
now, take one – they’re FREE.
Strict HTML 4.01, grab the handbook
understanding how to be strict
Extract data from pdf table - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to save editable pdf form in reader; pdf form save in reader
Extract data from pdf table - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
flatten pdf form in reader; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
253
The <html> element: don’t leave home without it.
Always start each page with a DOCTYPE, but following 
that, the 
<html>
 element must always be the top, or 
root, element of your Web page. So, after the DOCTYPE, 
the 
<html>
 tag will start your page and the  
</html>
 tag 
should end it, with everything else in your page nested 
inside.
Remember to use both your <head> and your 
<body> for better HTML.
Only the 
<head>
 and 
<body>
 elements can go directly 
inside your 
<html>
 element. This means that every 
other element must go either inside the 
<head>
 or the 
<body>
 element. No exceptions!
Feed your <body> only wholesome block elements.
You can put only block elements (
<h1>, <h2>, ..., 
<h6>
<p>, <blockquote>
, and so on) directly inside your 
<body>
 element. All inline elements and text need to be 
inside another block element before they can go in the 
<body>
 element.
What’s a <head> without a <title>?
Always give your 
<head>
 element a 
<title>
 element. 
It’s the law. Failure to do so will result in HTML that isn’t 
compliant.  The 
<head>
 element is the only place you 
should put your 
<title>
<meta>
, and 
<style>
 elements.
Webville Guide to Strict HTML 4.01
Traveling on the information super-highway can be dangerous if you don’t 
know the rules. In this handy guide, we’ve boiled strict HTML 4.01 down 
into a common sense set of rules, starting with the major rules first:
Keep block elements out of your inline elements.
The only things you can put in an inline element are text 
and other inline elements. Block elements are not allowed 
under any circumstances.
C# Word - MailMerge Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Execute MailMerge in OpenXML File with Data Source. Execute MailMerge in Microsoft Access Database by Using Data Source(X86 Only).
extract data out of pdf file; extract pdf data to excel
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
java read pdf form fields; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
254
Chapter 6
Keep block elements out of your <p> element.
Paragraphs are for text, so keep block elements out 
of your paragraphs. Of course it is perfectly fine to use 
all the inline elements you want in them (
<em>
,
<a>
,
<strong>
,
<img>
,
<q>
, and so on).
Lists are for list items.
Only the 
<li>
 element is allowed in the 
<ul>
 and 
<ol>
elements. Why would you want to put anything other 
than a list item in an unordered or ordered list anyway?
Who knew?  The <blockquote> only likes 
block elements.
The 
<blockquote>
 element requires one or more 
block elements inside it. While it’s common to see text 
directly inside a block quote, that isn’t up to code here 
in Webville. Please always put your text and inline 
elements inside block elements before adding them to 
<blockquote>
.
Go ahead, put whatever you want in a list item.
Webville has very liberal laws when it comes to the 
<li>
element: you can put text, inline elements, or block 
elements inside your list items.
Oops! We weren’t 
up to the 4.01 
standard when 
we did Tony’s 
<blockquote> in 
Chapter 3. That 
text should have 
been put inside a 
<p> first.
Webville Guide to Strict HTML 4.01 Continued
Now that you’ve got the major rules down, let’s look at some of the finer 
points of the law.
Be careful about nesting an inline element 
inside another inline element.
While you can nest just about any inline element in 
another, there are a couple of cases that don’t make 
sense. Never nest an 
<a>
 element inside another 
<a>
element because that would be too confusing for our 
visitors. Also, empty elements like 
<img>
 provide no 
way to nest other inline elements within them.
strict html
fine points
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also supported. methods and events necessary to load a Word document from file or query data and save the
using pdf forms to collect data; extract data from pdf to excel
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Create the Data Abstraction Layer. Drag and drop the REImageDatabase table from the server provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
save data in pdf form reader; how to fill in a pdf form in reader
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
255
Q: 
That wasn’t too bad; I was expecting 
pages
of rules I had to remember. Can I really write strict 
HTML 4.01 just following these rules?
A: 
These rules will get you a long way, but 
remember, you haven’t learned everything about HTML 
yet, so there are going to be a few new things that 
you’ll need to keep in mind too. That said, there is no 
reason to memorize all these rules.  Your common 
sense and this guide is a good start, and from there 
you can also consult an HTML reference or just ask the 
validator if your HTML is valid (you should anyway!) 
when you get into some tricky areas.
Q: 
So whenever possible, always go with 
strict?
A: 
It depends. Just throwing up a page that three 
people in the world will see? Hey, as long as it looks 
good in all your browsers, who cares. But if you’re 
doing something a fair number of people will visit, 
you’ll be better off keeping your HTML up to standards 
and validating it. Should that be the transitional or 
strict standard? Well, the world is moving in the 
strict direction, so you can pay now or pay later, but 
eventually, it will be in your best interest to go strict. 
When you’re starting fresh, strict is just as easy.  And 
if you use strict, moving to XHTML will be a lot easier, 
and we’re going to do that in the very next chapter and 
use XHTML in the rest of the book.
Q: 
So I get that putting an <a> inside an <a> 
is confusing and wouldn’t work anyway.  But I can 
really put an <em> inside an <em>? What’s the 
point of that?
A: 
In principle, someone might want to put 
emphasis on emphasis. That seems silly, but since it 
doesn’t cause problems, like nested 
<a>
 elements 
do, the standard just says, if you want to do it, you 
can. What about a 
<q>
 within a 
<q>
, would that ever 
make sense? Sure, you might quote someone who 
quotes someone else. So, in general you can nest 
any of the inline elements inside other inline elements.  
Some of these make more sense than others, but the 
<a>
 element is the only one that you can’t nest inside 
itself. Remember too, that the 
<img>
 element is 
empty, so you can’t nest anything inside it.
Q: 
So why can’t I put text directly in a 
<blockquote>? A list item can have text or a block 
element. That seems inconsistent.
A: 
’Cause the standard says so. Just kidding. 
You’re right, it does seem inconsistent, but it’s all 
based on the intent of the element. Take the <p> 
element, for instance.  It’s for one text paragraph, so 
of course no other block elements are allowed in it. 
<blockquote>? It’s for quoting large portions of text 
from another source, which might include headings, 
paragraphs, whatever. So the point is to “quote 
blocks.” List items? They’re like the contortionists of 
the element world – they have to be able to hold simple 
text, large bits of text like paragraphs or even other 
lists, so they can handle everything.
Q: 
I noticed the validator said  
the standard requires the “alt”  
attribute on <img> elements. Are  
there any other attributes that are  
required?
A: 
Wow, good catch. Yes, the 
alt
 attribute 
is required on images for accessibility, so that, for 
instance, the visually impaired can know what the 
image is, even if they can’t see it. The other required 
attribute is the 
src
 attribute on an image – what good 
is an 
<img>
 element if it doesn’t point to an image? 
There are also some attributes that were okay with 
HTML 3.2 that you can’t use anymore with strict HTML 
4.01. Why? Because most of them affected the way 
Web pages looked, and you’re supposed to be using 
CSS for that kind of styling (more on this topic in just a 
couple of chapters).
Validator
Webville’s a friendly 
place. Forget a rule? Just 
run it by me, the Validator. 
I’ll get you pointed in the 
right direction.
there are no
Dumb Questions
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
pdf form save with reader; extracting data from pdf files
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Easy to put link into specified position of PDF text, image and PDF table. Enable users to copy and paste PDF link. Help to extract and search url in PDF file.
extract data from pdf file to excel; how to save pdf form data in reader
256
Chapter 6
Hey there, Strict.  You here to talk about how 
much you love frustrating Web page writers?
Oh, you know, all those Web page writers out 
there who are struggling to get their Web pages 
to validate with your strict DOCTYPE.  You’re 
pretty tough, you know.
Tough love?
Oh, please.  Not everyone wants to be strict all 
the time.
Not everyone can, or wants to, transition their 
entire Web site to the strict standard overnight, 
you know.  Sheesh, I’m playing an important 
role here.
How is it future-proofing anything?
What’s that supposed to mean?
It’s tough love, man.
Yeah.  Sooner or later any page of  importance 
really needs to move to strict. You may think 
I’m tough now, but you’ll love me later.
Huh?  You encourage people to stay behind 
the times with all those old tags and attributes.  
You’re just a crutch.
The way I see it, people get to say they’re 
“standard HTML” when in reality, they’re still 
relying on old habits.  I say, strict is the way to 
go.  That’s the only way to future-proof  a Web 
site.
Hey man, some of your tags have been 
“deprecated.” Do you know what that means? It 
means they’re going away. By going strict now, 
it’ll be a lot easier to update to the next version 
of HTML.
Tonight’s talk:  Transitional and Strict try to 
recruit followers.
Transitional
Strict
pondering strict versus transitional
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
PDF table. Delete or remove partial or all hyperlinks from PDF file in VB.NET class. Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF file in VB.NET project. Extract
exporting pdf data to excel; extract pdf form data to xml
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
change font size pdf form reader; cannot save pdf form in reader
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
257
Transitional
Strict
So, you’re just going to leave behind all those 
millions of Web pages out there that still use older 
versions of HTML?  Ignore them completely?  I 
bet you use some nonstrict Web pages yourself.  
How ’bout I come over and check your history list?  
Not everyone wants to be on the cutting edge, 
you know.  Some people like using those old tags.  
Other people want to take things a bit slower, 
make sure they understand exactly what the new 
standard is before jumping in and willy-nilly 
changing their pages.  
You know, you really should be nice to me; I’ve 
helped a lot of pages move to strict. 
True, they can just start strict and won’t need me.  
Anyway, I’m going back to my kinder and gentler 
method of moving pages to strict. You can go back 
to cracking your whip.
Yeah, yeah.  Did you bother telling the readers that 
by the end of the chapter, you’ll be obsolete too?
Oh no, you’re not coming near my browser 
history; keep your grubby paws off it.  You’re 
right, there are a lot of useful pages out there 
that need to be updated, and maybe they never 
will be, but we’re trying to build a better Web.  
So stop encouraging people to stay behind the 
times.  
Willy-nilly?  There’s nothing willy-nilly about 
4.01.  It’s actually cleaner and simpler to 
understand than the older HTML versions. 
And, if people write their Web pages correctly, 
they’ll be well prepared to have their pages 
work well in browsers for a long time.
Okay, it is helpful for people to be able to mark 
their pages as transitional until they learn the 
new stuff.  All I’m saying here is transitional 
shouldn’t be used as a crutch. And anyone 
reading this book who is new to HTML and 
CSS has no need to be transitional. 
Hey! Watch it. Pages will be thanking me down 
the road for keeping them strict.
Uhhhh....
VB Imaging - VB ISBN Barcode Tutorial
BarcodeType.ISBN 'set barcode data barcode.Data = "978047082163" 'set x,y with the properties from the table in the ISBN Writing on Certain PDF Document Area.
edit pdf form in reader; pdf data extraction to excel
VB Imaging - VB Code 2 of 5 Generator
5 barcode size with parameters listed in the table below. quality Code 2 of 5 on PDF, TIFF, Microsoft of 5 type barcode encoding numeric data text "112233445566
pdf data extraction open source; online form pdf output
258
Chapter 6
One more question 
about this transitional 
stuff. What is all this old 
markup that isn’t allowed in 
strict? Have we seen any 
examples?
Even though we haven’t been including a 
DOCTYPE or a 
<meta>
tag, and we’ve 
been a little lazy on the image nesting rules, 
throughout this book you’ve been writing 
HTML that is very close to the standard. So, 
you haven’t had much opportunity to see the 
phased out elements and attributes. 
Want to see some? Just visit a few Web pages 
with your browser and choose “View Source” 
from the “View” menu (your browser’s menus 
may differ). Any tag or attribute that looks 
like it is used to alter the display of the page is 
most likely deprecated in HTML 4.01 (because 
that is now CSS’s job). It doesn’t hurt to know 
a little about these legacy elements, because 
you are quite likely to run into some of them 
now and then. Let’s take a quick look...
No, we’ve been writing mostly 
strict HTML all along.
That’s a good thing, because 
sometimes unlearning a bad 
habit is the hardest part of 
a new standard.
html and deprecated markup
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
259
<html>
<head>
<title>Webville Forecast</title>
</head>
<body bgcolor=”tan” text=”black”>
<p>
The weather report says lots of rain and wind in store for  
<font face=”arial”>
Webville
</font>
today, so be sure to       
stay inside if you can.
</p>
<ul>
<li>Tuesday: Rain and 60 degrees.
<li>Wednesday: Rain and 62 degrees.
</ul>
<p align=right>
Bring your umbrella!
<center><font size=”small”>
This page brought to you buy Lou’s  
Diner, a Webville institution for over 50 years.
</font></center>
</body>
</html>
Here are some attributes that 
controlled presentation.  bgcolor sets 
the background color of the page, and 
text sets the color of the body text.
Font changes were made with the 
<font> element and its face attribute.
You could get away without some 
closing tags, like </li> and </p>.
Here are two ways to align text. 
Right align a paragraph, or 
center a piece of text.
Text size was controlled with 
the <font> element, using 
the size attribute.
We did some digging and found an HTML 3.2 page 
that contains some elements and attributes that are no 
longer part of the standard, as well as a couple of common 
mistakes that are no longer allowed in strict HTML 4.01.
Or even without double quotes around 
attribute values.
HTML  
Archeology
260
Chapter 6
Below, you’ll find an HTML 
file. Your job is to play like 
you’re the validator and locate 
ALL the errors. After you’ve 
done the exercise, look at the 
end of the chapter to see if you 
caught them all.
BE the Validator
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN”
“http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd”>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1”>
</head>
<body>
<img src=”chamberofcommerce.gif”>
<h1>Tips for Enjoying Your Visit in Webville</h1>
<p>
Here are a few tips to help you better enjoy your stay in Webville.
<ul>
<li>Always dress in layers and keep an html around your 
head and body.</li>
<li>Get plenty of rest while you’re here, sleep helps all 
those rules sink in.</li>
<li>Don’t miss the work of our local artists right downtown
in the CSS gallery.</li>
</ul>
</p>
<p>
Having problems? You can always find answers at 
<a href=”http://www.headfirstlabs.com”><em>Head First Labs</em></a>.
Still got problems? Relax, Webville’s a friendly place, just ask someone
for help. And, as a local used to say:
</p>
<blockquote>
Don’t worry. As long as you hit that wire with the connecting hook 
at precisely 88mph the instant the lightning strikes the tower... 
everything will be fine. 
</blockquote>
</body>
</html>
Use the validator to check 
your work once you’ve done 
(or if you need hints). 
test your knowledge of strict
standards, compliance, and all that jazz
you are here 
261
HTML 4.01 is the HTML 
n
standard that is most 
widely supported by browsers.
The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is 
n
the standards organization that defines what 
“standard HTML” is.
Many browsers have two modes for displaying 
n
HTML: “quirks” mode for old HTML and 
standards mode for HTML 4.01.
If you don’t tell the browser which version of 
n
HTML you are using, many browsers will use 
quirks mode, which may cause inconsistent 
page display in various browsers.
The document type definition (DOCTYPE) is 
n
used to tell the browser which version of HTML 
your Web page is written in.
The strict DOCTYPE is used if you are writing 
n
fully compliant HTML 4.01.
Use the transitional DOCTYPE if you are 
n
transitioning HTML that still includes display-
oriented elements and attributes.
The <meta> tag in the <head> element tells 
n
the browser additional information about a 
Web page, such as the content type and 
character encoding.
A character encoding tells the browser the 
n
character set that is used in the Web page.
Most Western-European languages used on 
n
computers today can be represented with the 
ISO-8859-1 character encoding.
The 
n
W3C validator is a free online service that 
checks pages for compliance with standards.
Use the validator to ensure that your HTML 
n
is well formed and that your elements and 
attributes meet the standards.
By adhering to 
n
standards, your pages will 
display more quickly and with fewer display 
differences between browsers.
Doh!  We got it 
wrong – the boss wants 
us to go to  strict XHTML, not 
HTML.  Help!  That’s a whole 
different language isn’t it? 
BULLET POINTS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested