convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Vb extract data from pdf SDK Library service wpf asp.net azure dnn Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML34-part773

312
Chapter 8
What if we move the font up the family tree?
body
html
h1
h2
a
img
a
p
p
em
p
We’re going to move the font-family 
property from the paragraphs and 
headings to the body. 
If most elements inherit the font-family property, what if we move it up 
to the 
<body>
element? That should have the effect of changing the font for 
all the 
<body>
element’s children, and children’s children. 
body {
font-family:  sans-serif;
}
h1, h2 {    
font-family:  sans-serif;
color:  
gray;
}
h1 { 
border-bottom: 1px solid black;
}
p {
font-family:  sans-serif;
color:  
maroon;
}
Wow, this is powerful. Simply by changing the font-
family property in the body rule, we could change 
the font for an entire site.
What are you waiting for... give it a try
Here’s what you’re going to do.
 First, add a new rule that selects 
the <body> element.  Then add the 
font-family property with a value 
of sans-serif.
Then, take the font-family 
property out of the h1, h2 
rule, as well as the p rule.
Now all these elements are going to 
inherit the font-family.
Remember, images 
don’t have text.
And so are their children.
Open your “lounge.css” file and add a new rule that selects the 
<body>
element. Then remove the font-family properties from the headings and 
paragraph rules, because you’re not going to need them anymore.
moving rules to the body element
Vb extract data from pdf - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to save pdf form data in reader; how to save a pdf form in reader
Vb extract data from pdf - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
pdf data extraction to excel; exporting data from pdf to excel
getting started with css
you are here 
313
Test drive your new CSS
As usual, go ahead and make these changes in the “lounge.css” 
style sheet, save, and reload the “lounge.html” page. You shouldn’t 
expect any changes, because the style is the same.  It’s just coming 
from a different rule. But you should feel better about your CSS 
because now you can add new elements to your pages and they’ll 
automatically inherit the sans-serif font.
Okay, so now that the whole 
site is set to sans-serif with 
the body selector, what if I want 
one
element to be a different font?  Do 
I have to take the font-family out 
of the body and add rules for every 
element separately again?
Surprise, surprise. This doesn’t look any 
different at all, but that is exactly what we 
were expecting, isn’t it? All you’ve done is move 
the sans-serif font up into the body rule and 
let all the other elements inherit that.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
saving pdf forms in acrobat reader; fill in pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
extract data from pdf to excel online; extracting data from pdf into excel
314
Chapter 8
Overriding inheritance
By moving the font-family property up into the body, you’ve set that 
font style for the entire page.  But what if you don’t want the sans-serif 
font on every element?  For instance, you could decide that you want 
<em>
elements to use the serif font instead.  
The font-family property is set in 
the body rule, so every element inside 
the body inherits the sans-serif 
font-family property from <body>.
But you’ve decided you want your <em> 
elements to have the serif font-family 
instead.  You need to override the 
inheritance with a CSS rule.
body {
font-family:  sans-serif;
}
h1, h2 {    
color:  
gray;
}
h1 { 
border-bottom: 1px solid black;
}
p {
color:  
maroon;
}
em {
font-family: serif;
}
Well, then you can override the inheritance by supplying a 
specific rule just for 
<em>
. Here’s how you add a rule for 
<em>
to override the font-family specified in the body:
To override the font-family property 
inherited from body, add a new rule 
selecting em with the font-family 
property value set to serif.
body
html
h1
h2
a
img
a
p
p
em
p
when you don’t want to inherit
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
extract data from pdf c#; how to extract data from pdf to excel
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
extract data from pdf using java; extract table data from pdf to excel
getting started with css
you are here 
315
Test drive
Add a rule for the 
<em>
element to your CSS with a 
font-family property value of serif, and reload 
your “lounge.html” page:
Notice that the “Dance Dance 
Revolution” text, which is the text in 
the <em> element, is now a serif font.  
As a general rule, it’s not a good idea to change fonts 
in the middle of a paragraph like this, so go ahead and 
change your CSS back to the way it was (without the em 
rule) when you’re done testing.
Q: 
How does the browser know 
which rule to apply to <em> when I’m 
overriding the inherited value?
A: 
With CSS, the most specific rule 
is always used. So, if you have a rule for 
<body>, and a more specific rule for <em> 
elements, it is going to use the more specific 
rule. We’ll talk more later about how you  
know which rules are most specific.
Q: 
How do I know which CSS 
properties are inherited and which are 
not?
A: 
This is where a good reference 
really comes in handy, like O’Reilly’s CSS 
Pocket Reference
.  In general, all of the 
styles that affect the way your text looks, 
such as font color (the color property), the  
font-family, as you’ve just seen, and other 
font related properties such as font-size, 
font-weight (for bold text), and font-style 
(for italics) are inherited.   Other properties, 
such as border, are not inherited, which 
makes sense, right?  Just because you want 
a border on your <body> element doesn’t 
mean you want it on 
all
 your elements.  A 
lot of the time you can follow your common 
sense (or just try it and see), and you’ll get 
the hang of it as you become more familiar 
with the various properties and what they do.  
Q: 
Can I always override a property 
that is being inherited when I don’t want 
it?
A: 
Yes.  You can always use a more 
specific selector to override a property from 
a parent.  
Q: 
This stuff gets complicated. Is 
there any way I can add comments to 
remind myself what the rules do?
A: 
Yes.  To write a comment in your 
CSS just enclose it between /* and */. For 
instance:
/*  this rule selects all para
-
graphs and colors them blue */
Notice that a comment can span multiple 
lines. You can also put comments around 
CSS and browsers will ignore it, like:
/* this rule will have no effect 
because it’s in a comment
p { color: blue; }  */
there are no
Dumb Questions
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
extract data from pdf form fields; how to fill in a pdf form in reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
External cross references. Private data of other applications. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; how to save a filled out pdf form in reader
316
Chapter 8
I was thinking it would 
be cool to have the text below 
each elixir match the color of 
the elixir. Can you do that?
Green text.
Blue text.
Purple text.
Red text... oh, 
we don’t need to 
change this one.
Can you style each of these paragraphs separately 
so that the color of the text matches the drink? The 
problem is that using a rule with a “p” selector applies 
the style to all 
<p>
elements. So, how can you select 
these paragraphs individually?
That’s where classes come in. Using both XHTML and 
CSS, we can define a class of elements, and then apply 
styles to any element that belongs to that class. So, what 
exactly is a class? Think of it like a club – someone 
starts a “greentea” club, and by joining you agree to all 
the rights and responsibilities of the club, like adhering 
to their style standards. Anyway, let’s just create the class 
and you’ll see how it works.
We’re not sure we agree with the 
aesthetics of that suggestion, 
but, hey, you’re the customer.
styling individual paragraphs
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF
extract pdf form data to excel; extract table data from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET.
save data in pdf form reader; how to fill out pdf forms in reader
getting started with css
you are here 
317
Adding a class to “elixir.html”
Open up the “elixir.html” file and locate the  “Green Tea Cooler” paragraph. 
This is the text we want to change to green. All you’re going to do is add the 
<p>
element to a class called greentea. Here’s how you do that:
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN”
“http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd”>
<html xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml” lang=”en” xml:lang=”en”>
<head>
<meta http-equiv=“Content-Type” content=“text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1” />
<title>Head First Lounge Elixirs</title>
<link type=“text/css” rel=”stylesheet” href=”../lounge.css” />
</head>
<body>
<h1>Our Elixirs</h1>
<h2>Green Tea Cooler</h2>
<p class=“greentea”>
<img src=“
../images/green.jpg
” />
Chock full of vitamins and minerals, this elixir
combines the healthful benefits of green tea with
a twist of chamomile blossoms and ginger root.
</p>
<h2>Raspberry Ice Concentration</h2>
<p>
<img src=“
../images/lightblue.jpg
” />
Combining raspberry juice with lemon grass,
citrus peel and rosehips, this icy drink
will make your mind feel clear and crisp.
</p>
<h2>Blueberry Bliss Elixir</h2>
<p>
<img src=“
../images/blue.jpg
” />
Blueberries and cherry essence mixed into a base
of elderflower herb tea will put you in a relaxed
state of bliss in no time.
</p>
<h2>Cranberry Antioxidant Blast</h2>
<p>
<img src=“
../images/red.jpg
” />
Wake up to the flavors of cranberry and hibiscus
in this vitamin C rich elixir.
</p>
</body>
</html>
To add an element to a class, just add 
the attribute “class” along with the name 
of the class, like “greentea”.
And, now that the green tea paragraph belongs to the greentea class, you just 
need to provide some rules to style that class of elements. 
318
Chapter 8
Creating a selector for the class
body {
font-family: sans-serif;
}
h1, h2 {    
color: gray;
}
h1 { 
border-bottom: 1px solid black;
}
p {
color: maroon;
}
p.greentea {
color: green;
}
To select a class, you write the selector like this:
p.greentea {
color: green;
}
Then use a “.” to 
specify a class. 
This selector selects 
all paragraphs in the 
greentea class.
The p selector 
is first.
Last is the 
class name.
And here’s the rule... make any 
text in a paragraph in the 
greentea class the color green.
So now you have a way of selecting  
<p>
elements that belong to a certain class. 
All you need to do is add the 
class
attribute to any 
<p>
elements you want to be 
green, and this rule will be applied. Give it a try: open your “lounge.css” file and 
add the p.greentea class selector to it.
class selectors
getting started with css
you are here 
319
Your turn: add two classes, “raspberry” and “blueberry”, to the correct 
paragraphs in “elixir.html”, and then write the styles to color the text blue and 
purple, respectively. The property value for raspberry is “blue” and for blueberry 
is “purple”.  Put these at the bottom of your CSS file, under the greentea rule: 
raspberry first, and then blueberry.
A greentea test drive
Save, and then reload to give your new class a test drive. 
Here’s the new greentea class 
applied to the paragraph. Now 
the font is green and matches 
the Green Tea Cooler.  Maybe 
this styling wasn’t such a bad 
idea after all.
Yeah, we know you’re probably thinking, how can a 
raspberry be blue?  Well, if Raspberry Kool-aid is 
blue, that’s good enough for us.  And seriously, when 
you blend up a bunch of blueberries, they really are 
more purple than blue.  Work with us here.
Sharpen your pencil
320
Chapter 8
Taking classes further...
You’ve already written one rule that uses the greentea class to change any 
paragraph in the class to the color “green”:
p.greentea {
color: green;
}
But what if you wanted to do the same to all 
<blockquote>
s? 
Then you could do this:
blockquote.greentea, p.greentea {
color: green;
}
Just add another selector to handle 
<blockquote>s that are in the greentea 
class. Now this rule will apply to <p> and 
<blockquote> elements in the greentea class.
So what if I want to 
add <h1>, <h2>, <h3>, <p>, and 
<blockquote> to the green tea 
class? Do I have to write one 
huge
selector?
No, there’s a better way. If you want all 
elements that are in the greentea class 
to have a style, then you can just write 
your rule like this:
.greentea {
color: green;
}
If you leave out all the element names, 
and just use a period followed by a 
class name, then the rule will apply to 
all members of the class.
dealing with class selectors
And in your XHTML you’d write: 
<blockquote class=”greentea”>
getting started with css
you are here 
321
Cool!  Yes, that works. 
One  more question... you said 
being in a class is like being in a 
club. Well, I can join many clubs. 
So, can an element be in more 
than one class?
It’s easy to put an element into more than one class. Say 
you want to specify a 
<p>
element that is in the greentea, 
raspberry, and blueberry classes. Here’s how you 
would do that in the opening tag:
Yes, elements can be in more than one class.
<p class=”greentea raspberry blueberry”>
Place each class 
name into the 
value of the class 
attribute, with a 
space in between 
each. The ordering 
doesn’t matter.
Now you may be wondering what happens when an element belongs 
to multiple classes, all of which define the same property – like our 
<p>
element up there.  How do you know which style gets applied? You know 
each of these classes has a definition for the color property. So, will the 
paragraph be green, blue (raspberry), or purple?
We’re going to talk about this in great detail after you’ve learned a bit 
more CSS, but on the next page you’ll find a quick guide to hold you over.
So, for example, I could 
put an <h1> into my “products” 
class that defines a font size and 
weight, and also a “specials” class 
to change its color to red when 
something’s on sale?
Exactly.  Use multiple classes when you want 
an element to have styles you’ve defined in 
different classes.  In this case, all your 
<h1>
elements associated with products have a 
certain style, but not all your products are 
on sale at the same time.  By putting your 
“specials” color in a separate class, you can 
simply add only those elements associated with 
products on sale to the “specials” class to add 
the red color you want. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested