convert pdf to image c# itextsharp : Export pdf form data to excel control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML35-part774

322
Chapter 8
The world’s smallest & fastest guide to how 
styles are applied
Elements and document trees and style rules and classes... it can get downright confusing. 
How does all this stuff come together so that you know which styles are being applied to 
which elements? As we said, to fully answer that you’re going to have to know a little more 
about CSS, and you’ll be learning that in the next few chapters.  But before you get there, 
let’s just walk through some common sense rules-of-thumb about how styles are applied.
First, do any selectors select your element?
Let’s say you want to know the font-family property value for an element. The first 
thing to check is: is there a selector in your CSS file that selects your element? If there is, 
and it has a font-family property and value, then that’s the value for your element.
What about inheritance?
If there are no selectors that match your element, then you rely on inheritance. So, look at 
the element’s parents, and parents’ parents, and so on, until you find the property defined. 
When and if you find it, that’s the value.
Struck out again?  Then use the default
If your element doesn’t inherit the value from any of its ancestors, then you use the default 
value defined by the browser. In reality, this is a little more complicated than we’re describing 
here, but we’ll get to some of those details later in the book. 
What if multiple selectors select an element?
Ah, this is the case we have with the paragraph that belongs to all three classes:
There are multiple selectors that match this element and define the same color property. 
That’s what we call a “conflict”. Which rule breaks the tie? Well, if one rule is more specific 
than the others, then it wins. But what does more specific mean? We’ll come back in a later 
chapter and see exactly how to determine how specific a selector is, but for now, let’s look at 
some rules and get a feel for it:
p { color: black;}
.greentea { color: green; }
p.greentea { color: green; }
p.raspberry { color: blue; }
p.blueberry { color: purple; }
Here’s a rule that selects any old 
paragraph element.
This rule selects members of the greentea class. 
That’s a little more specific.
And this rule selects only paragraphs that are in 
the greentea class, so that’s even more specific.
These rules also select only paragraphs in a 
particular class. So they are about the same in 
specificity as the p.greentea rule.
<p class=”greentea raspberry blueberry”>
intro to applying styles
Export pdf form data to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; how to fill pdf form in reader
Export pdf form data to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
using pdf forms to collect data; how to extract data from pdf file using java
getting started with css
you are here 
323
And if we still don’t have a clear winner?
So, if you had an element that belonged only to the greentea class there 
would be an obvious winner: the p.greentea selector is the most specific, 
so the text would be green. But you have an element that belongs to all three 
classes: greentea, raspberry, and blueberry. So, p.greentea, 
p.raspberry, and p.blueberry all select the element, and are of 
equal specificity.  What do you do now? You choose the one that is listed 
last in the CSS file.  If you can’t resolve a conflict because two selectors are 
equally specific, you use the ordering of the rules in your style sheet file.  
That is, you use the rule listed last in the CSS file (nearest the bottom). And 
in this case, that would be the p.blueberry rule.
In your “lounge.html” file, change the greentea paragraph to include all the 
classes, like this:
<p class=”greentea raspberry blueberry”>
Save, and reload. What color is the Green Tea Cooler paragraph now?
Next, reorder the classes in your XHTML:
<p class=”raspberry blueberry greentea”>
Save, and reload. What color is the Green Tea Cooler paragraph now?
Next, open your CSS file and move the p.greentea rule to the bottom of the file.
Save, and reload. What color is the Green Tea Cooler paragraph now?
Finally, move the p.raspberry rule to the bottom of the file.
Save, and reload. What color is the Green Tea Cooler paragraph now?
After you’ve finished, rewrite the green tea element to look like it did originally:
<p class=”greentea”>
Save, and reload. What color is the Green Tea Cooler paragraph now?
Exercise 
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process
cannot save pdf form in reader; pdf form field recognition
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process
extract data from pdf table; can reader edit pdf forms
324
Chapter 8
Did you see that? I’m like Houdini! I broke right 
out of your 
<style>
element and into my own 
file.  And you said in Chapter 1 that I’d never 
escape.
Have to link me in? Come on; you know your 
pages wouldn’t cut it without my styling.
If you were paying attention in this chapter, you 
would have seen I’m downright powerful in what 
I can do.
Well now, that’s a little better.  I like the new 
attitude.
Don’t get all excited; I still have to link you in 
for you to be at all useful.
Here we go again... while me and all my 
elements are trying to keep things structured, 
you’re talking about hair highlights and nail 
color.
Okay, okay, I admit it; using CSS sure makes 
my job easier. All those old deprecated styling 
elements were a pain in my side. I do like the 
fact that my elements can be styled without 
inserting a bunch of stuff in the XHTML, 
other than maybe an occasional class attribute.
But I still haven’t forgotten how you mocked 
my syntax... <remember>?
Tonight’s talk:  CSS & XHTML compare languages
CSS
XHTML
language comparison: css and xhtml
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for learn how to fill-in field data to PDF
pdf data extraction tool; pdf form save with reader
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email.
change font size pdf form reader; make pdf form editable in reader
getting started with css
you are here 
325
You have to admit XHTML is kinda clunky, but 
that’s what you get when you’re related to an 
early ’90s technology.
Are you kidding?  I’m very expressive.  I can 
select just the elements I want, and then 
describe exactly how I want them styled. And 
you’ve only just begun to see all the cool styling 
I can do.
Yup; just wait and see. I can style fonts and 
text in all kinds of interesting ways. I can even 
control how each element manages the space 
around it on the page.
Bwahahahaa. And you thought you had me 
controlled between your 
<style>
tags. You’re 
going to see I can make your elements sit, bark, 
and rollover if I want to.
I call it standing the test of time. And you think 
CSS is elegant? I mean, you’re just a bunch of 
rules. How’s that a language?
Oh yeah?
Hmmm... sounds as if you have a little too 
much power; I’m not sure I like the sound of 
that. After all, my elements want to have some 
control over their own lives.
Whoa now! Security... security?!
CSS
XHTML
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data.
extract pdf form data to xml; exporting pdf data to excel
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process
html form output to pdf; extract pdf data into excel
326
Chapter 8
Who ge ts the inheritance?
Sniff, sniff; the 
<body>
 element has gone to that great browser in the sky. But he left 
behind a lot of descendants and a big inheritance of 
color “green”. Below you’ll find his 
family tree. Mark all the descendants that inherit the 
<body>
 element’s color green. Don’t 
forget to look at the CSS below first.
body {
color: green;
}
p {
color: black;
}
body
h1
p
h2
blockquote
p
a
p
h2
em
em
p
em
a
a
img
Here’s the CSS.  Use this to 
determine which of the above 
elements hit the jackpot and 
get the green (color).
testing your inheritance skills
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Able to export PDF document to HTML file. C#.NET applications, like ASP.NET web form application and for C#.NET supports file conversion between PDF and various
extract data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET.
extract pdf data to excel; export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet
getting started with css
you are here 
327
Below, you’ll find the CSS file 
“style.css”, with some errors in it. 
Your job is to play like you’re the 
browser and locate all the errors. 
After you’ve done the 
exercise look at the 
end of the chapter to 
see if you caught all 
the errors.
BE the Browser
<style>
body {
background-color: white
h1, {
gray;
font-family: sans-serif;
}
h2, p {
color: 
}
<em> {
font-style: italic;
}
</style>
The file “style.css”
If you have errors in your CSS, 
usually what happens is all the rules 
below the error are ignored.  So, get 
in the habit of looking for errors now, 
by doing this exercise.
328
Chapter 8
The exercise got me 
thinking... is there a way to 
validate CSS like there is with 
HTML and XHTML?
Those W3C boys and girls aren’t just sitting 
around on their butts, they’ve been working hard. 
You can find their CSS validator at:
http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Type that URL in your browser and we think 
you’ll feel quite at home when you get there. 
You’re going to find a validator that works almost 
exactly like the HTML and XHTML validators. 
To use the CSS version, 
just point the validator to 
your CSS URL, upload a 
file with your CSS in it, or 
just paste it into the form 
and submit.
You shouldn’t encounter 
any big surprises, like 
needing DOCTYPEs or 
character encodings with 
CSS. Go ahead, give it a 
try (like we’re not going 
to make you do it on the 
next page, anyway).
Of course!
validating css
getting started with css
you are here 
329
Making sure the Lounge CSS validates
Before you wrap up this chapter, wouldn’t you feel a lot better if all that Head First 
Lounge CSS validated? Sure you would. Use whichever method you want to get 
your CSS to the W3C.  If you have your CSS on a server, type your URL into the 
form; otherwise, either upload your CSS file or just copy and paste the CSS into the 
form. (If you upload, make sure you’re directing the form to your CSS file, not your 
XHTML file.) Once you’ve done that, click on “Check”.
This is just telling you that the 
CSS needs correct XHTML to 
style, so make sure your XHTML 
(or HTML) also validates.
Here are some warnings about the CSS. These 
are more suggestions than real warnings. For 
instance, all these warnings are telling you to set a 
background color on the headings and paragraphs.
And here’s all the valid CSS, 
which is ALL your CSS, so this 
means your CSS validates.
If your CSS didn’t validate, check 
it with the CSS a few pages back 
and find any small mistakes you’ve 
made, then resubmit.
Q: 
Do I need to worry about those 
warnings? Or do what they say?
A: 
It’s good to look them over, but 
you’ll find some are more in the category of 
suggestions than “must do’s”. The validator 
can err on the side of being a little anal, so 
just keep that in mind.
there are no
Dumb Questions
There’s no “green badge of success” when 
you pass validation like there is when you 
validate XHTML.  So check the top of 
the page for “Errors”.  If you don’t see 
that, your CSS validated!
330
Chapter 8
CSS has a 
lot
of style properties. 
You’ll see quite a few of these in 
the rest of this book, but have a 
quick look now to get an idea 
of all the aspects of style 
you can control with CSS.
font-weight
list-style
margin
border
background-image
letter-spacing
This property controls the 
weight of text.  Use it to 
make text bold. 
This lets you set the spacing 
between letters.  L i k e   t h i s.
Use this property 
to put an image 
behind an element..
This property sets the 
space between lines in a 
text element.
This property puts a border around an 
element. You can have a solid border, a 
ridged border, a dotted border...
If you need space 
between the edge of an 
element and its content, 
use margin.
font-style
Use this property for 
italic or oblique text.
This property lets you 
change how list items 
look in a list.
font-size
Makes text bigger 
or smaller.  
color
Use color to set the font 
color of text elements.
background-color
This property controls the 
background color of an element.
left
This is how you tell an 
element how to position its 
left side.
text-aligUnse this property to align your text 
to the left, center, or right.
top
Controls the 
position of the 
top of the 
element.
Property
Soup
line-height
getting a feel for some other properties
getting started with css
you are here 
331
CSS contains simple statements, called rules.
n
Each rule provides the style for a selection of 
n
XHTML elements.
A typical rule consists of a selector along with 
n
one or more properties and values.
The selector 
n
specifies which elements the rule 
applies to.
Each property declaration ends with a 
n
semicolon.
All properties and values in a rule go between 
n
{ } braces.
You can select any element using its name as 
n
the selector.
By separating element names with commas, 
n
you can select multiple elements at once.
One of the easiest ways to include a style in 
n
HTML is the <style> tag.
For XHTML and for sites of any complexity, 
n
you should link to an external style sheet.
The <link> element is used to include an 
n
external style sheet.
Many properties are inherited.  For instance, 
n
if a property that is inherited is set for the 
<body> element, all the <body>’s child 
elements will inherit it.
You can always override properties that are 
n
inherited by creating a more specific rule for 
the element you’d like to change.
Use the 
n
class
 attribute to add elements to 
a class.
Use a “.” between the element name and the 
n
class name to select a specific element in that 
class.
Use 
n
“.classname” to select any elements that 
belong to the class.
An element can belong to more than one class 
n
by placing multiple class names in the class 
attribute with spaces between the names.
You can validate your CSS using the W3C 
n
validator, at http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator. 
It looks like you’re 
getting the hang of this style 
stuff.  We’re looking forward to 
seeing what you come up with in 
the next couple of chapters.
BULLET POINTS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested