c# pdf to image free : Extract data from pdf to excel online SDK software API .net winforms azure sharepoint Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML46-part786

434
Chapter 11
p
div
div
p
h2
p
img
h2
h1
p
p
h2
img
h2
h1
p
p
p
div id=“dogs”
div id=“cats”
Now that you know which elements belong 
in each section, you can add some XHTML 
to mark up this structure. The common 
way to do this is to place 
<div>
opening 
and closing tags around the elements that 
belong to a logical section. Let’s first do this 
pictorially, and then we’ll come back to the 
real markup in a couple of pages.
Using <div>s to mark sections
Let’s nest the elements in each 
grouping in a <div> element.
Here’s our cat group.
And here’s our 
dog group.
Just by nesting your elements in 
<div>
s, you’ve indicated that all those 
elements belong to the same group.  
But you haven’t given them any kind 
of label that says what the grouping 
means, right?
A good way to do that is to use an 
id
attribute to provide a unique label for 
the 
<div>
. For instance, let’s give the 
cats 
<div>
an id of “cats” and the 
dogs 
<div>
an id of “dogs”.
Labelling the <div>s
Here we’ve added an id 
of “cats” to the first 
<div> to indicate what 
the logical section is for.
And likewise for dogs. 
how to mark logical sections with divs
Extract data from pdf to excel online - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
save pdf forms in reader; extract data from pdf to excel online
Extract data from pdf to excel online - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
vb extract data from pdf; how to make pdf editable form reader
divs and spans
you are here 
435
brain
power
?
On a referral from the Starbuzz 
CEO, you’ve been asked to 
come in and consult on style 
changes to PetStorz main 
page. How quickly would you 
understand the PetStorz Web 
page if you were shown Page 
One?
What about Page Two?
p
h2
img
h2
h1
p
p
p
div id=“dogs”
div id=“cats”
p
h2
img
h2
h1
p
p
p
Page Two
Page One
Okay, so you’ve added some logical 
structure to the PetStorz page, and you’ve 
also labeled that structure by giving each 
<div>
a unique id. That’s all you need 
to start styling the group of elements 
contained in the 
<div>
.
Adding some style
Now the <div>s 
have a little style. 
Here we have two rules, one 
for each <div>.  Each <div> is 
selected by an id selector.
p
h2
img
h2
h1
p
p
p
div id=“dogs”
div id=“cats”
#cats {
background-image: url(leopard.jpg);
}
#dogs {
background-image: url(mutt.jpg);
}
Each rule sets the 
background-image 
property.  For cats we 
have a leopard image, 
and for dogs we have 
a mutt image.
By setting the 
background on the 
<div>, it also shows 
through the elements 
contained in the <div>.
The elements in the <div> will also 
inherit some properties from the 
<div>, just as any child element 
does (like font-size, color, etc).
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
how to type into a pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf file to excel
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. If you want to extract text from a PDF document using Visual Basic .NET programming language
make pdf form editable in reader; extract pdf data to excel
436
Chapter 11
There are a couple of reasons you might 
want to add more structure to your 
pages with 
<div>
s.  First, you may 
want to further expose the underlying 
logical structure of your pages, which 
can help others understand them, and 
also help in maintaining them.  Second, 
there are times when you need the 
structure so that you have a way to apply 
style to a section. Often, you’ll want to 
add the structure for both reasons.
So, in the case of PetStorz, we could 
take this to the next level and add a few 
more 
<div>
s...
Exposing even more structure
Now we’ve added 
another <div> with an 
id indicating this is the 
header of the page.
And another indicating 
the footer of the page.
div id=“header”
p
h2
img
h2
h1
p
p
p
div id=“dogs”
div id=“cats”
div id=“footer”
And you don’t have to stop there.  It is 
common to nest structure, too.  For instance, 
in the PetStorz page, we have a cat section 
and a dog section, and the two together are 
logically the “pets” section of the page. So, 
we could place both the “cat” and “dog” 
<div>
s into a “pets” 
<div>
.
Adding structure on structure
div id=“header”
p
img
h1
p
h2
h2
p
p
div id=“dogs”
div id=“cats”
div id=“footer”
div id=“pets”
Adding this structure through <div>s 
can even help you think through your 
page design.  For instance, does this 
lone <p> really need to be here?
Now we’ve marked up this XHTML so that 
we know there is a logical section in the page 
with “pets” content in it.  Further, that “pets” 
section has two logical subsections, one for 
“cats” and one for “dogs”.
nesting divs
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; change font size pdf form reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file.
extracting data from pdf forms to excel; java read pdf form fields
divs and spans
you are here 
437
Q: 
So, a <div> acts like a container 
that you can put elements into to keep 
them all together?
A: 
It sure does. In fact, we often 
describe <div>s as “containers”. Not only 
do they act as logical containers that you 
can use to hold a bunch of related elements 
(like the “cat” elements) together, but when 
we start styling <div>s and using them for 
positioning in the next chapter, you’ll see 
they act as graphical containers, too.
Q: 
Beyond the structure I’m already 
putting into my pages with headings and 
paragraphs and so on, should I also be 
adding a higher level of structure with 
<div>s?
A: 
Yes and no. You want to add 
structure where it has a real purpose, but 
don’t add structure for structure’s sake. 
Always keep your structure as simple as 
possible to get the job done. For instance,  
if it is helpful to add a “pets” section 
that contains both “cats” and “dogs” to 
the PetStorz page, by all means add it. 
However, if it provides no real benefit, then 
it just complicates your page. After working 
with <div>s for a while, you’ll start to get a 
feel for when and how much to use them.  
Q: 
Do you ever put <div>s in a class 
instead of giving it an id?
A: 
Well, remember that an element can 
have an id 
and
 be in one or more classes at 
the same time, so the choice isn’t mutually 
exclusive. And, yes, there are many times 
you create <div>s and place them into 
classes. Say you have a bunch of album 
sections in a page of music playlists; you 
might put all the elements that make up the 
album into a <div> and then put them all in a 
class called “albums”. That identifies where 
the albums are, and they can all be styled 
together with the class.  At the same time 
you might give each album an id so that it 
can have additional style applied separately.
Q: 
I was having a little trouble 
following the <div> within <div> stuff, 
with the “pets” and “cats” and “dogs”. 
Could you explain that a little more?
A: 
Sure. You’re used to elements being 
nested in other elements, right? Like a <p> 
nested in a <body> nested in an <html> 
element. You’ve even seen lists nested 
within lists. The <div> is really no different; 
you’re just nesting an element inside another 
element, and, in the case of PetStorz, we’re 
using it to show larger chunks of structure 
(a “cats” and “dogs” nested in a “pets” 
section). Or, you might use <div>s to have a 
beer section nested in a beverages section 
nested in a menu section.  
But, the best way to understand why you’d 
want something like a <div> within a <div> is 
by using them and encountering a situation 
where they mean something to you.  Put this 
in the back of your mind and you’ll see an 
example soon enough where we need one.
there are no
Dumb Questions
Use, don’t abuse, <div>s in your pages. Add additional 
structure where it helps you separate a page into logical 
sections for clarity and styling. Adding <div>s just for 
the sake of creating a lot of structure in your pages 
complicates them with no real benefit.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
pdf data extraction tool; extract data from pdf form to excel
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email.
exporting data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf form fields
438
Chapter 11
Meanwhile, back at the lounge...
Okay, enough “theory” about 
<div>
s – let’s get one into the lounge page.  Remember, we’re trying to get 
all the elixir elements into a group and then we’re going to style it to make it look like the elixir handout. 
So, open up your “lounge.html” file in the “chapter11/lounge” folder, locate the elixirs elements, and then 
insert opening and closing 
<div>
tags around them.
<div id=“elixirs”>
<h2>Weekly Elixir Specials</h2>
<p>
<img src=“images/yellow.gif” alt=“Lemon Breeze Elixir” />
</p>
<h3>Lemon Breeze</h3>
<p>
The ultimate healthy drink, this elixir combines
herbal botanicals, minerals, and vitamins with
a twist of lemon into a smooth citrus wonder
that will keep your immune system going all
day and all night.
</p>
<p>
<img src=“images/chai.gif” alt=“Chai Chiller Elixir” />
</p>
<h3>Chai Chiller</h3>
<p>
Not your traditional chai, this elixir mixes mat&eacute;
with chai spices and adds an extra chocolate kick for
a caffeinated taste sensation on ice.
</p>
<p>
<img src=“images/black.gif” alt=“Black Brain Brew Elixir” />
</p>
<h3>Black Brain Brew</h3>
<p>
Want to boost your memory? Try our Black Brain Brew
elixir, made with black oolong tea and just a touch
of espresso. Your brain will thank you for the boost.
</p>
<p>
Join us any evening for these and all our
other wonderful
<a href=“beverages/elixir.html”
title=“Head First Lounge Elixirs”>
elixirs</a>.
</p>
</div>
And, here’s the closing tag.
Here’s the opening tag, 
and we’ve given it an id of 
“elixirs” to identify it.
Remember we’re just 
showing a snippet of 
XHTML from the 
entire file. When you 
open “lounge.html”, you’ll 
see all the markup for 
the page.
adding divs to the lounge
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
pdf data extraction open source; can reader edit pdf forms
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; extract table data from pdf
divs and spans
you are here 
439
Taking the <div> for a test drive
That was easy, wasn’t it? Now that we’ve got a more 
structured page, let’s fire up the browser and see 
how it looks...
Hmmm... no change at all!  
But that’s okay: the <div> 
is pure structure, and it 
doesn’t have any “look” or 
default style in the page. 
That said, a <div> is just a block 
element, and you can apply any styles 
you want to it. So, once you know how 
to style a block element (and you do), 
you know how to style a <div>.
brain
power
?
Remember, the goal here is to restyle the elixir content on the page 
so it looks like the handout.
Before we took a detour to learn about <div>s, we were trying to 
figure out how to get a border around the entire set of elixirs. Now 
that you’ve got a <div> in “lounge.html”, how would you go about 
adding a border?
Weekly Elixir 
Specials
Lemon Breeze
Chai Chiller
Black Brain Brew
The ultimate healthy drink, 
this elixir combines herbal 
botanicals, minerals, and 
vitamins with a twist of 
lemon into a smooth citrus 
wonder that will keep your 
immune system going all 
day and all night.
Not your traditional chai, 
this elixir mixes maté with 
chai spices and adds 
an extra chocolate kick 
for a caffeinated taste 
sensation on ice.
Want to boost your 
memory?  Try our Black 
Brain Brew elixir, made 
with black oolong tea and 
just a touch of espresso.  
Your brain will thank you 
for the boost.
Join us any evening for these and all 
our wonderful elixirs.
440
Chapter 11
An over-the-border test drive
After you’ve added the CSS, save it and then reload 
your “lounge.html” file.
Here’s the border that you just added 
to the elixirs <div> element.
Notice that the border goes 
around all the elements inside 
the <div> element.  The <div> 
is a box like every other 
element, so, when you add 
a border, the border goes 
around the content, which is 
all the elements in the <div>.
You added a visible border 
to this <div>, but it still has 
no padding and no margin.  
We’ll need to add that too.
Adding a border 
Okay, now that you have a 
<div>
around all the elements in the elixirs 
section, the fun begins: you can style it.  
The first thing we want to reproduce in the elixirs handout is a border that 
wraps around all the elements in the elixirs section, right?  Well, now that 
you actually have a 
<div>
element that wraps around the elixirs section, 
you can style it and add a border.  Let’s try that now.
You’ll need a new rule in the lounge’s CSS to select the 
<div>
element 
using its id.  Open up your “lounge.css” file in the “chapter11/lounge” 
folder, and add this rule at the end:
#elixirs {
border-width: thin;
border-style: solid; 
border-color: #007e7e;
}
Add this at the end of your CSS file.  It 
selects the elixirs <div> element using its id, 
and adds a thin, solid border in our favorite 
aquamarine color. 
adding style to a div
divs and spans
you are here 
441
Adding some real style to 
the elixirs section
The main heading 
and the paragraph 
text are black, while 
the drink names are 
a red color that 
matches the red in 
the logo. 
The text and images 
are centered, and 
there’s padding on 
the sides to add 
space between the 
text and the border.
The line-height of the 
paragraphs looks a lot more 
like the default line height for 
the page (before we changed it 
in the last chapter).
The font family is a sans-serif font, just 
like the body font, so we don’t have to 
change that. Remember that the <div> 
element and all the elements nested in it 
inherit the font family from the body.
The width of the elixirs 
handout is narrower than the 
rest of the page.
There’s a background 
image at the top.
So far, so good. We’ve found a way to get 
that border around the entire section. Now 
you’re going to see how to use the 
<div>
to 
customize the styling of the entire elixirs section 
independent of the rest of the page.
We obviously have some padding issues to deal 
with, because the border is right up against the 
content. But there’s a lot of other style we need 
to work out, too. Let’s take a look at everything 
we need to take care of...
This link is aquamarine.
442
Chapter 11
That’s a lot of new style, so let’s get a game plan together before 
attacking it. Here’s what we need to do:
First, we’re going to change the width of the elixirs 
<div>
to 
make it narrower.  
Next, we’ll knock out some of the styles you’re already familiar 
with, like padding and the background image. We’ll also play 
with the text alignment, which you haven’t seen before.
Then all we’ve got left are the text line heights and the heading 
colors. You’re going to see that you need to upgrade your CSS 
selector skills just a bit to get those changed.
Working on the elixir width
The game plan
That’s a lot to do, so let’s get started.
The width property lets you specify the width of 
the element’s content area. Here we’re specifying 
that the content width be 200 pixels.
We’d like the elixirs to be quite narrow, so it looks like the narrow 
handout menu at the lounge; about 1/4 the width of a typical 
browser window should be about right. So, if most people set their 
browser windows to 800 pixels wide, that would be about 200 
pixels.  You’ve set the widths of padding, borders, and margins, 
but you’ve never set the width of an element before. To do that 
you use the 
width
property, like this:
#elixirs {
border-width: thin;
border-style: solid; 
border-color: #007e7e;
width: 200px;
}
Give this a try.  Open your “lounge.css” and add this rule to the bottom. 
We’re setting this on the elixirs <div>. So the content 
in the elixirs <div> will be 200 pixels wide, and the 
browser’s layout rules will work to fit all the elements 
nested in the <div> within that width.
plan of attack
divs and spans
you are here 
443
Now all the content in the elixirs 
<div> fits into a space that is 200 
pixels wide. It doesn’t change, even if 
you make your browser window really 
wide, or really narrow.  Try it!
200 pixels
Compare the behavior of the <div> 
to that of the other elements 
when you make your browser 
window wide. The paragraphs 
automatically expand to fill the 
width of the browser. We’ll talk 
about that more in a sec...
Notice that the 
height of the elixirs 
section got a lot 
taller.  That’s because 
we made it narrower, 
so the content 
takes up more room 
vertically instead.
Next, save the CSS and then reload the “lounge.html” file.  You’ll see the elixirs 
section get much skinnier, thanks to the width you gave it.  The width of the 
content in the 
<div>
is now exactly 200 pixels. There’s also some interesting 
behavior you should check out...
Test driving the width
brain
power
?
Can you resize your browser window to less than the width of the elixirs <div>?  Some browsers 
won’t let you go that narrow; others will.  If you can go narrower, compare the text in the elixirs 
<div> with the rest of the text on the page.  The other paragraphs resize themselves no matter 
how wide or narrow you go, but the elixirs <div> never gets narrower or wider than 200 pixels.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested