c# pdf to image free : Extract data from pdf file to excel software SDK project winforms wpf windows UWP Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML48-part788

454
Chapter 11
Your turn.  Write the selector that selects only <h3> elements inside the elixirs <div>.  
In your rule, set the color property  to #d12c47. Also label the elements in the graph 
below that are selected.
div id=”elixirs”
h3
h3
html
body
h1
h3
h2
h2
div id=”calendar”
h2
h3
h1
h2
Q: 
Descendant usually means child, 
grandchild, great-grandchild. Here, we’re 
just selecting the child descendants, 
right?
A: 
That’s a really good point. 
The selector “#elixirs h2” means ANY 
descendant of elixirs, so the <h2> could be 
a direct child of the <div> or nested down 
inside a <blockquote> or another nested 
<div> (making it a grandchild) and so on. 
So a descendant selector selects any <h2> 
nested inside an element, no matter how 
deeply it is nested.
Q: 
Well, is there a way to select a 
direct child?
A: 
Yes.  For example, you could use  
“#elixirs > h2”, to select <h2> only if it is 
the direct child of an element with an id of 
“elixirs”.
Q: 
What if I need something more 
complex, like an <h2> that is the child of 
a <blockquote> that is in elixirs?
A: 
It works the same way.  Just use 
more descendants, like this:
#elixirs blockquote h2 {
color: blue;
}
This selects any <h2> elements that 
descend from <blockquote>s that descend 
from an element with an id of “elixirs”.
there are no
Dumb Questions
Sharpen your pencil
more on selecting children
Extract data from pdf file to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract pdf data to excel; extract data from pdf file
Extract data from pdf file to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
edit pdf form in reader; pdf form save in reader
divs and spans
you are here 
455
Changing the color of the elixir headings
Now that you know about descendant selectors, let’s set the 
<h2>
heading to 
black and the 
<h3>
headings to red in the elixirs. Here’s how you do that:
#elixirs h2 {
color: black;
}
#elixirs h3 {      
color: #d12c47;
}
Here we’re using the descendant 
selectors to target just the <h2> 
and <h3> elements in the elixirs <div>. 
We’re setting <h2> to black, and <h3> 
to a red color, using a hex code.
A quick test drive...
Go ahead and add these new properties to the bottom of your 
“lounge.css” file, save, and reload “lounge.html”.
We’ve got black and red headings 
in the elixirs section, and we 
haven’t affected the aquamarine 
color being used for <h2> 
headings in the main page.
Now all we need to do is 
fix the line height.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Able to extract and get all and partial text content from PDF file. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
save pdf forms in reader; sign pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Extract Text Content from PDF File in VB.NET.
extract data from pdf c#; extracting data from pdf forms
456
Chapter 11
another way to specify line height
Fixing the line height
Recall that in the last chapter we made the line height of the text in 
the lounge a little taller than normal.  This looks great, but in the 
elixirs we want our text to be a normal, single-spaced, line height to 
match the handout. Sounds easy enough, right? Just set the line-height 
property on the 
<div>
and everything will be fine, because line-height 
is inherited. The only problem is that the headings will also inherit the 
line-height, and we’ll end up with something like this.
If you set the line-height property on 
the entire <div> then it will be inherited 
by all elements in the <div>, including the 
headings. Notice that the line height in 
the heading is too small and the two lines 
are starting to run together.
#elixirs {
line-height: 1em;
}
The reason that the line-height for the elixirs heading is 
too small is because every element in the elixirs 
<div>
inherits the line-height of 1em, or “1 times the font size of 
the elixirs element”, which in this case is “small”, or about 
12 pixels (depending on your browser).  Remember, the 
elixirs 
<div>
is inheriting its font-size from the 
<body>
element, which we set to “small.”
What we really want is for all the elements in the elixirs 
<div>
to have a line-height that’s based not on the 
font-size of the elixirs 
<div>
, but rather the font-size of 
each element itself.  We want the 
<h2>
heading to have 
a line-height that is 1 times its font-size (which is 120% of 
“small”), and the 
<p>
should also have a line-height of 1 
times its font-size (which is “small”).  How can you do this?  
Well, line-height is a bit special because you can use just a 
number instead of a relative measure – like em or % – for 
line-height.  When you use just a number, you’re telling 
each element in the elixirs 
<div>
to have a line-height 
of 1 times its own font-size, rather than the font-size of 
the elixirs 
<div>
 Give it a try; set the line-height of the 
elixirs 
<div>
to 1, and you’ll see that it fixes the heading.
#elixirs {
line-height: 1;
}
div id=”elixirs” 
size is “small”
h2 is 120% of “small”
body size is “small”
body line-height is 
1.6 times “small”
h2 is 120% of “small”
line-height is 1 times 
120% of small, or 
about 14 pixels
div id=”elixirs”
line-height is 1 times 
“small”, or about 12 pixels
Here are the font sizes 
of the elements.  We set 
body to “small”, so that’s 
inherited by elixirs.
The line-height of 
<h2> is set to 1 times 
the font size of 
elixirs, which is “small”, 
or about 12 pixels.
We want <h2> to 
have a line-height 
that is 1 times 
its own font size, 
that is, 14 pixels 
(120% of small).
Add a line-height of 1 
to the elixirs <div> to 
change the line-height 
of each element in it.
The font-size of the p element is “small” (p inherits 
its font-size from the elixirs <div>) so it will have a 
line-height of 12 pixels, which is what we want.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
extract data from pdf form to excel; exporting pdf data to excel
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
External cross references. Private data of other applications. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
export pdf form data to excel; extract data from pdf forms
divs and spans
you are here 
457
Look what you’ve accomplished...
Wow, that’s fantastic!  
You were able to make the 
elixirs section on the Web site 
look like the handout, with 
just a little CSS.
Take a look at the elixirs section now.  You’ve 
completely transformed it, and now it looks 
just like the handout.  And, other than adding 
<div>
and an 
id
attribute to your XHTML, 
you were able to do this with just a few CSS 
rules and properties.  
By now, you should be realizing just how 
powerful CSS is, and how flexible your Web 
pages are when you separate your structure 
(XHTML) from your presentation (CSS).  You 
can give your XHTML a whole new look, 
simply by changing the CSS.
Remember, this is how the 
elixirs section looked when 
we started...
... and here’s 
what it looks 
like now.  
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Merge PDF with byte array, fields. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end
change font size pdf form reader; c# read pdf form fields
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file.
extract pdf form data to xml; filling out pdf forms with reader
458
Chapter 11
It’s time to take a little shortcut
You’ve probably noticed that there are quite a few CSS properties that seem to 
go together.  For instance, padding-left, padding-right, padding-
bottom
, and padding-top. Margin properties are the same way.  How about 
background-image, background-color, and background-repeat?  
Those all set different property values on the background of an element.  Have you 
also noticed it gets a little tedious typing all those in?  There are better things to spend 
your time on than typing all this, right?
padding-top:    0px;
padding-right:  20px;
padding-bottom: 30px;
padding-left:   10px;
That’s a lot of typing just to 
specify four numbers.
Well, here’s a special bonus for this chapter.  You’re going to learn how to specify all 
those values without risking carpal tunnel.  Here’s how:
Here’s the old school way of 
specifying your padding.
padding-top:    0px;
padding-right:  20px;
padding-bottom: 30px;
padding-left:   10px;
padding: 0px 20px 30px 10px;
And here’s the new and improved 
way to write them as a shorthand.
top
right
bottom
left
You can use the same sort of shorthand with margins:
margin-top:    0px;
margin-right:  20px;
margin-bottom: 30px;
margin-left:   10px;
margin: 0px 20px 30px 10px;
top
right
bottom
left
Just like padding, you can use 
a shorthand to specify all your 
margin values with one property.
If your padding or margins are the same value on all sides, 
you can make the shorthand really short:
padding-top:    20px;
padding-right:  20px;
padding-bottom: 20px;
padding-left:   20px;
padding: 20px;
This says that the padding 
should be 20 pixels on 
every side of the box.
If all your padding values are the same, 
then you can write it like this.
specifying properties with shorthand
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Library. Best Microsoft Office Excel to adobe PDF file converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file. Export
extract data from pdf table; make pdf form editable in reader
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
All object data. File attachment. External cross references. Private data of other applications. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
extract table data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf file to excel
divs and spans
you are here 
459
border-width:      thin;
border-style:      solid; 
border-color:      #007e7e;
border: thin solid #007e7e; 
Rewrite border 
properties as one 
property. These can be 
in any order you like.
But there’s more...
Here’s another common way to abbreviate margins (or padding):
margin-top:    0px;
margin-right:  20px;
margin-bottom: 0px;
margin-left:   20px;
margin: 0px 20px;
top and bottom
right and left
If the top and bottom, as well as the right and left 
margins are the same, then you can use a shorthand.
And what about the border properties we mentioned? 
You can use a shorthand for those too.
The border shorthand is even more flexible than margins or padding 
because you can specify them in any order you like.
border: solid thin #007e7e; 
border: #007e7e solid thin; 
border: solid thin; 
border: #007e7e solid; 
border: solid; 
These are all perfectly 
valid border shorthands.
background-color:  white;
background-image:  url(images/cocktail.gif);
background-repeat: repeat-x;
You can also use shorthand for backgrounds:
...and don’t forget the shorthand for backgrounds
background: white url(images/cocktail.gif) repeat-x;
Like border, values can go in any order 
in this shorthand.  There are also a 
few other values you can specify in the 
shorthand, like background-position.
top and bottom 
are the same.
right and left 
are the same.
460
Chapter 11
And even more shorthands
No description of shorthands would be complete without mentioning font shorthands. 
Check out all the properties we need for fonts: font-family, font-style, 
font-weight, font-size, font-variant, and don’t forget line-height. 
Well, there’s a shorthand that wraps all these into one. Here’s how it works:
font: 
font-style font-variant font-weight font-size/line-height font-family
These values are all optional. You 
can specify any combination of 
them, but they need to come 
before font-size.
You must specify 
font size.
The line-height is 
optional. If you want 
to specify one, just 
put a / right after 
the font-size and 
add your line height.
Use commas 
between your 
font family 
names.
Here are the properties that go into the 
font shorthand. Ordering matters here 
unless we say otherwise...
So let’s give this a try. Here are the font properties for the lounge body:
font-size: small;
font-family: Verdana, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
line-height: 1.6em;
Now let’s map those to the shorthand:
font: 
font-style font-variant font-weight font-size/line-height font-family
We’re not using any of these, but 
that’s okay, they’re all optional.
And now let’s write the shorthand:
font: small/1.6em Verdana, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
And here’s the shorthand version. Wow, that’s quite a 
shorthand, huh? You’re going to be able to double your time 
at the slopes (or on the beach) now.
Finally you need to add 
your font families. You only 
need to specify one font, 
but alternatives are highly 
encouraged.
shortcuts for fonts
divs and spans
you are here 
461
It’s time to put all your new knowledge to work. You’ll notice that at the bottom of the lounge, there’s a small 
section with copyright information that acts as a footer for the page. Add a <div> to make this into its own 
logical section. After you’ve done that style it with these properties:
Let’s make the text really small. 
You know, FINE PRINT.
And let’s center the text.
We’re also setting the line-height to be 
“normal”, which is a keyword you haven’t seen 
yet. “Normal” allows the browser to pick an 
appropriate size for the line-height, which is 
typically based on the font.
And let’s add some top margin to give the 
footer a little breathing room.
And while you’re at it, have a look over the entire “lounge.css” file. Is there anywhere you might want to 
simplify things with shorthands? If so, go ahead and make those changes.
Q: 
Should I always use shorthand?
A: 
Not necessarily. Some people find the long form more 
readable. Shorthands do have the advantage of reducing the size 
of your CSS files, and certainly they are more quickly entered 
because they require less typing. However, when there is a 
problem, they are a little more difficult to “debug” if you have 
incorrect values or the wrong order.  So, you should use whichever 
form is more comfortable because they are both perfectly valid.
Q: 
Shorthands are more complex because I have to 
remember the ordering and what is and isn’t optional. How do 
I memorize it all?
A: 
Well, you’ll be surprised how quickly it becomes second 
nature, but those of us in the “biz” have a little secret we like to call 
there are no
Dumb Questions
To remember the 
ordering of the padding 
and margin shorthand 
values, think of a 
clock labelled with top, 
right, bottom, and left.  
Then, always go in a 
clockwise direction: top 
to right to bottom to left.
Make it Stick
margin: 0px 20px 30px 10px;
top
right
bottom
left
a “reference manual.” Just pick one up, and should you need 
to quickly look up property names or the syntax of a property, 
just grab your handy reference manual and look it up. We’re 
particularly fond of the 
CSS Pocket Reference
 by Eric Meyer.  
It’s tiny and makes a great reference.
font-size: 50%;
text-align: center;
line-height: normal;
margin-top: 30px;
Exercise 
462
Chapter 11
I saw the nice job you 
did on the elixirs. Can you 
give us a hand with the music 
recommendations on the site? 
We don’t need much, just 
some simple styling.
The lounge’s 
resident DJ.
All the CD titles are 
in an italic font style.
And all the artists 
are in bold.
What do you think is the best way to style the CD and artists in the 
“What’s playing at the Lounge” section?
brain
power
?
another lounge assignment
divs and spans
you are here 
463
Frank:  Yeah, but that’s kind of like using a 
<blockquote>
just to 
indent text. What I mean is that we don’t really want to emphasize and 
strongly emphasize the CD and artists. We just want italic and bold. 
Plus, what if someone changes the style for 
<em>
and <strong>?  
That would show up on the CDs and artists too.
Jim:  Well, I actually thought about that, but I couldn’t think of any 
other way to do it. I mean this is just text in the same list item.  It’s not 
like we have any way to style it.
Frank:  What do you mean?
Jim:  We can only style elements, and here we just have a bit of text, 
like, “Music for Airports, Brian Eno”. We’d need an element around 
each piece of text to be able to style them differently.
Frank:  Oh, right, right. I see what you mean.
Jim: I suppose we could use something like 
<div class=”cd”>Music for Airports</div>
<div class=”artist”>Brian Eno</div>.
But that’s a block element, so that is going to cause linebreaks.
Frank:  Ahhh, I think you’re on to something, Jim. There’s another 
element like 
<div>
that is for inline elements.  It’s called a 
<span>
That could work out perfectly.
Jim:  I’m game. How does it work?
Frank:  Well, a 
<span>
gives you a way to create a grouping of inline 
characters and elements. Here, let’s just give it a try...
I was thinking we could just 
wrap <em> and <strong> elements 
around the CDs and artists. On 
most browsers that’s going to give 
us italic and bold.
Jim
Frank
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested