c# pdf to image free : Extract data from pdf c# software application cloud windows winforms web page class Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML63-part805

xhtml forms
you are here 
605
Adding the form element
Once you know the URL of the Web application that will process your form, all you 
need to do is plug it into the 
action
attribute of your <form> element, like this 
(follow along and type the changes into your XHTML):
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN” 
“http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd”>
<html xmlns=“http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml” lang=“en” xml:lang=“en” >
<head>
<meta http-equiv=“Content-Type” content=“text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1” />
<title>The Starbuzz Bean Machine</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>The Starbuzz Bean Machine</h1>
<h2>Fill out the form below and click submit to order</h2>
<form action=”http://www.starbuzzcoffee.com/processorder.php” method=”POST”>
</form>
</body>
</html>
Here’s the 
form element.
The action attribute contains the 
URL of the Web application.
And remember we’re using the 
“POST” method to deliver 
the form data to the server. 
More on this later.
Go ahead and add the 
form closing tag too.
So far so good, but an empty <form> element isn’t going to get you very far. 
Looking back at the sketch of the form, there’s a lot there to add, but we’re going 
to start simple and get the “Ship to:” part of the form done first, which consists of 
a bunch of text inputs. You already know a little about text inputs, but let’s take a 
closer look. Here’s what the text inputs for the Starbuzz form look like:
<input type=”text” name=”name” />
<input type=”text” name=”address” />
<input type=”text” name=”city” /> 
<input type=”text” name=”state” /> 
<input type=”text” name=”zip” /> 
We’ve got one 
text input for 
each input area in 
the form: Name, 
Address, City, 
State, and Zip.
We use the <input> 
element for a few 
different controls. 
The type attribute 
determines what kind 
of control it is.
Here the type is “text” because this 
is going to be a text input control. 
The name attribute acts as an identifier for the 
data the user types in. Notice how each one is set to 
a different value. Let’s see how this works...
Extract data from pdf c# - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract data from pdf to excel online; pdf form data extraction
Extract data from pdf c# - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to save pdf form data in reader; save pdf forms in reader
606
Chapter 14
How form element names work
Here’s the thing to know about the 
name
attribute: it acts as the glue between 
your form and the Web application that processes it. Here’s how this works:
<input type=”text” name=”name” />
<input type=”text” name=”address” />
<input type=”text” name=”city”  /> 
<input type=”text” name=”state”  /> 
<input type=”text” name=”zip”  /> 
processorder.php
www.starbuzzcoffee.com
When you type the elements for a form into your 
XHTML file, you give them unique names. You saw this 
with the text inputs:
Each input control in your form has a 
name attribute
Each <input> element 
gets its own name.
Say you type your name, address, city, state, and zip 
into the form and click submit. The browser takes 
each of these pieces of data and labels them with your 
unique name attribute values.  The browser then sends 
the names and values to the server. Like this:
When you submit a form, the browser 
packages up all the data using the 
unique names:
name = Buckaroo Banzai
address = Banzai Institute
city = Los Angeles
state = CA
zip = 90050
What you enter into 
the form.
What the browser packages 
up for the server.
The unique 
names for each 
form element.
The Web application needs the form data to 
be labelled so it can tell what is what.
form element names
Notice here we’ve got an element whose 
name is “name” (which is perfectly fine).
Each unique 
name gets a 
value from the 
data you type 
into the form.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to fill pdf form in reader; pdf data extractor
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references:
extract data from pdf form; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
xhtml forms
you are here 
607
there are no
Dumb Questions
Q:
What’s the difference between a 
text <input> and a <textarea>?
A: 
You want to use a text <input> for 
entering text that is just a single line, like 
a name or zip code, and a <textarea> for 
longer, multi-line text. 
Q:
Can I make the submit button say 
something other than “Submit”?
A: 
Yes, just put a value attribute in the 
element and give it a value like “Order Now”. 
You can also use the value attribute of text 
input to give that input some default text.
Q:
Is there a limit to how much 
text I can type into a text <input> or a 
<textarea>?
A: 
Browsers do place a limit on the 
amount of text you can type into either a 
text <input> or a <textarea>; however, it’s 
usually way more than you’d ever need to 
type.  If you’d like to limit how much your 
users can type into a text <input>, you can 
use the maxlength attribute and set it to a 
specific number of characters. For example, 
maxlength=”100” would limit users to typing 
at most 100 characters. However, for a 
<textarea>, there is no way with XHTML to 
limit how much your users can type.
Q:
I still don’t get how the names get 
matched up with the form data.
A: 
Okay, you know each form element 
has a unique name, and you also know 
that the element has a corresponding value.  
When you click the submit button the  
browser takes all the names along with 
their values and sends them to the server.  
For instance, when you type the zip code 
“90050” into a text <input> element with the 
name “zip”, the browser sends “zip = 90050” 
to the server when the form is submitted.  
Q:
How does the Web application 
know the names I’m going to use in my 
form?  In other words, how do I pick the 
names for my form elements?
A: 
Good question. It really works 
the other way around: you have to know 
what form names your Web application 
is expecting and write your form to match 
it.  If you’re using a Web application that 
someone else wrote, they’ll have to tell 
you what names to use, or provide that 
information in the documentation for the 
application. A good place to start is to ask 
your hosting company for help.
Q:
Why doesn’t the <option> 
element have a name attribute?  Every 
other form element does.
A: 
Good catch. All <option> elements 
are actually part of the menu that is created 
by the <select> element. So, we only really 
need one name for the entire menu, and 
that is already specified in the <select> 
element. In other words, <option> elements 
don’t need a name attribute because the 
<select> has already specified the name for 
the entire menu. Keep in mind that when 
the form is submitted, only the value of the 
currently selected option is sent along with 
this name to the server.
Q:
Didn’t you say that the name for 
each form element needs to be unique?  
But the radio <input> elements all have 
the same name.
A: 
Right. Radio buttons come as a set. 
Think about it: if you push one button in, the 
rest pop out. So, for the browser to know 
the radio buttons belong together, you use 
the same name. Say you have a set of radio 
buttons named “color” with values of “red”, 
“green”, and “blue”.  They’re all colors, and 
only one color can be selected at a time, so 
a single name for the set makes sense.
Q:
What about checkboxes? Do they 
work like radio buttons?
A: 
Yes; the only difference is that you 
are allowed to select more than one choice 
with a checkbox. 
When the browser sends the form data to 
the server, it combines all the checkbox 
values into one value and sends them 
along with the checkbox name. So, say 
you had “spice” checkboxes for “salt”, 
“pepper”, and “garlic”, and you checked them 
all; then the server would send “spice = 
salt&pepper&garlic” to the server.
Q:
Geez, do I really need to know 
all this stuff about how data gets to the 
server?
A: 
All you need to know is the names 
and types of the form elements your Web 
application is expecting. Beyond that, 
knowing how it all works sometimes helps, 
but, no, you don’t need to know all the gory-
behind-the-scenes details of what is being 
sent to the server.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
extract data from pdf file; save data in pdf form reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Furthermore, if you are a Visual C# .NET programmer, you can go to this Visual C# tutorial for PDF text extraction in .NET project. Extract Text Content from
exporting pdf form to excel; extract data from pdf using java
608
Chapter 14
<form action=”http://www.starbuzzcoffee.com/processorder.php” method=”POST”>
<p>Ship to: 
<br />
Name: 
<input type=”text” name=”name” /> <br />
Address: 
<input type=”text” name=”address” /> <br />
City: 
<input type=”text” name=”city” /> <br />
State: 
<input type=”text” name=”state” /> <br />
Zip: 
<input type=”text” name=”zip” /> <br />
</p>
<p>
<input type=”submit” value=”Order Now” /> 
</p>
</form>
Back to getting those <input> elements into your XHTML
Now we’ve got to get those 
<input>
elements inside the form. 
Check out the additions below, and then make the changes in 
your “form.html”.
Here’s JUST the form 
snippet from “form.html”. 
Hey, we’ve got to save a 
few trees here! 
We’re going to 
start by putting 
everything inside 
a <p> element.
You can only nest block elements 
directly inside a form.
Here are all 
the <input> 
elements: one 
for each text 
input in the 
“Ship to” section 
of the form.
We’ve added a label for each 
input so the user knows what 
goes in the text input.
And you should also know that <input> is an 
inline element, so if you want some linebreaks 
between the <input> elements, you have to 
add <br />s. That’s also why you need to 
nest them all inside a paragraph.
Finally, don’t forget that users need a submit button to 
submit the form. So add a submit button by inserting an 
<input> at the bottom with a type of “submit”. Also add 
a value of “Order Now”, which will change the text of the 
button from “Submit” to “Order Now”.
After you’ve made all these changes, save your “form.html” file 
and let’s give this a whirl.
Don’t forget to validate your 
XHTML. Forms elements need 
validation too!
adding input elements
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
how to make a pdf form fillable in reader; pdf form save with reader
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
extract table data from pdf to excel; extract data from pdf file
xhtml forms
you are here 
609
A form-al test drive
Here’s the Web application’s 
response. It looks like the 
application got what we 
submitted, but we haven’t given 
it everything it needs.
Reload the page, fill in the text inputs, and submit the form. 
When you do that, the browser will package up the data 
and send it to the URL in the 
action
attribute, which is at 
www.starbuzzcoffee.com.
You don’t think we’d give you a toy example 
that doesn’t really work, do you? Seriously, 
starbuzzcoffee.com is all ready to take your 
form submission. Go for it!
Adding some more input elements to your form
It looks like the Web application isn’t going to let us get very far without telling it 
the beans we want, as well as the bean type (ground or whole). Let’s add the bean 
selection first by adding a 
<select>
element to the form. Remember that the 
<select>
element contains a list of options, each of which becomes a choice in 
a drop-down menu. Also, associated with each choice is a value; when the form is 
submitted, the value of the chosen menu option is sent to the server. Turn the page 
and let’s add the 
<select>
element.
Here’s the form.
And here’s the response 
after submitting the form.
Notice the change in the 
URL of your address bar 
after you submit the form 
(you’ll see the URL in the 
action attribute in the 
address bar).
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Turn PDF form data to HTML form. NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage using simple C# code.
export excel to pdf form; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF Merge PDF without size limitation. RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is
how to save fillable pdf form in reader; extracting data from pdf forms
610
Chapter 14
Adding the <select> element
<form action=”http://www.starbuzzcoffee.com/processorder.php” method=”POST”>
<p> Choose your beans: 
<select name=”beans”>
<option value=”House Blend”>
House Blend</option>
<option value=”Bolivia”>
Shade Grown Bolivia Supremo</option>
<option value=”Guatemala”>
Organic Guatemala</option>
<option value=”Kenya”>
Kenya</option>
</select>
</p>
       <p>Ship to: <br />
Name: <input type=”text” name=”name” /> <br />
Address: <input type=”text” name=”address” /> <br />
City: <input type=”text” name=”city” /> <br />
State: <input type=”text” name=”state” /> <br />
Zip: <input type=”text” name=”zip” /> <br />
</p>
<p>
<input type=”submit” value=”Order Now” /> 
</p>
</form>
Here’s our brand new 
<select> element. It gets a 
unique name too.
Inside we put each <option> element, one per choice of coffee.
<option value=”House Blend”>
House Blend</option>
Each option has a value. 
When the browser packages up 
the names and values of the form 
elements, it uses the name of the 
<select> element along with the value 
of the chosen option.
In this case, the browser would send the server 
beans = “House Blend”.
The content of the 
element is used as the label 
in the drop down menu.
HTML Up Close
Let’s take a closer look at the 
<option>
element.
using a select
xhtml forms
you are here 
611
Test driving the <select> element
Let’s give the 
<select>
element a spin now. Reload your page 
and you should have a nice new menu waiting on you. Choose your 
favorite coffee, fill in the rest of the form, and submit your order.
We still haven’t given the 
Web application everything 
it needs, but it’s getting 
everything in the form so far.
Here’s the result of 
the <select> choice.
Here are all the 
text inputs.
Here’s the form, complete 
with a <select>. Notice all 
the options are there.
612
Chapter 14
Change the <select> element name attribute to “thembeans”. Reload the form and resubmit 
your order. How does this affect the results you get back from the Web application? 
brain
power
?
Give the customer a choice of whole or ground beans
The customer needs to be able to choose whole or ground beans 
for their order. For those, we’re going to use radio buttons. Radio 
buttons are like the buttons on old car radios – you can push only 
one in at a time. The way they work in XHTML is that you create 
one 
<input>
of type “radio” for each button; so, in this case you 
need two buttons: one for whole beans and one for ground. Here’s 
what that looks like:
<p>Type: <br />
<input type=”radio” name=”beantype” value=”whole”  /> Whole bean <br />
<input type=”radio” name=”beantype” value=”ground” /> Ground
</p>
There are two 
radio buttons here: 
one for whole beans, 
and one for ground.
We’re using the <input> 
element for this, with its 
type set to “radio”.
Here’s the unique name. 
All radio buttons in the 
same group share the 
same name.
And here’s the value that will be 
sent to the Web application. Only 
one of these will be sent (the 
one that is selected when the 
form is submitted).
Notice that we 
often label radio 
buttons on the 
right-hand side of 
the element.
Make sure you change the name back to “beans” when you’re done with this exercise.
providing choices
xhtml forms
you are here 
613
Punching the radio buttons
Take the radio button XHTML on the previous page and insert it into 
your XHTML just below the paragraph containing the 
<select>
element. Make sure you reload the page, and then submit it again.
Depending on your browser, 
you may have noticed that 
no radio button was pressed 
when you reloaded the page.
Wow! Starbuzz took our order, and 
we’re not even done with it yet. We’ve 
still got to add the gift options and 
an area for customer comments. 
How could the order work without all 
the elements being in the form? Well, it 
all depends on how the Web application is 
programmed.  In this case, it is programmed 
to process the order even if the gift 
wrap and catalog options and the customer 
comments are not submitted with the rest 
of the form data. The only way you can 
know if a Web application requires certain 
form elements is to talk to the person who 
developed it, or to read the documentation.
614
Chapter 14
Hey, 80% of our customers 
order “ground” beans.  Can you 
make it so the ground bean type 
is already selected when the 
user loads the page?
If you add an attribute called 
checked
with a value of “checked” 
into your radio input element, then that element will be selected by 
default when the form is displayed by the browser.  Add the checked 
attribute to the ground” radio <input> element and give the page a 
test.  You’ll find the solution in the back of this chapter.
S
t
a
r
b
u
z
z
C
o
f
f
e
e
S
t
a
r
b
u
z
z
House Blend
Shade Grown Bolivia 
Supremo
Organic Guatemala
Kenya
Order Now
Completing the form
You’re almost there.  You’ve just got two sections 
to add to the form: the “Extras” section with 
the two checkboxes and the customer comment 
section. Since you’re getting the hang of forms, 
we’re going to speed up a bit and add them both 
at the same time.
The extras section consists of two 
checkboxes, one for gift wrap and 
another to include a catalog.
It looks like the “include catalog” 
option should be checked by default.
The customer comment 
section is just a 
<textarea>.
Exercise 
adding checkboxes
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested