c# pdf to image free : Extract data from pdf form fields Library software component .net winforms azure mvc Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML65-part807

xhtml forms
you are here 
625
Table
CSS
Dude, you have no idea what you’re talking 
about.  Forms should match the look and 
feel of the rest of the Web site.  Users will be 
confused if they go to fill out a form and it 
doesn’t look like part of the site.
I guess.  But when it comes to laying out a table 
properly, I’m the way to go.  The last time I saw 
someone trying to lay out a form using CSS, there 
were <div>s and <span>s all over the place; it was 
a mess.  And all that positioning and messing with 
margins to get the widths just right... it gave me a 
headache just looking at it all.
Well, what about all your <tr>s and <td>s 
littering up the XHTML?  That’s no different.
At least with my table rows and data cells, it’s easier 
to figure out what’s going to end up where; with 
your positioning tricks, I never know where stuff is 
going to end up.
You obviously haven’t read Chapter 12.  And 
I just don’t buy that form elements are tabular 
data... they’re XHTML elements, not data.
But the users are entering data into the form 
controls, aren’t they?  A form is used for gathering 
data from the person using the form. How is that 
not tabular data?
Hmm... I suppose I can sort of see that... but it  
just seems so wrong to use a table to do layout.  
Layout is presentation, and presentation is my job.
Well, I say if I can do a job better than you, then, 
hey, use me to do it.  I’m happy to oblige.
Better than me?  Whoa now, that’s going too 
far... 
Tell you what, why don’t we just let the readers 
decide?
Extract data from pdf form fields - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
make pdf form editable in reader; online form pdf output
Extract data from pdf form fields - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to flatten a pdf form in reader; pdf data extraction tool
626
Chapter 14
To Table or Not to Table? That’s the question...
You’re going to find people on both sides of this issue. Should you use 
CSS to layout your forms? Or tables? The harsh reality is that laying out 
forms with CSS is difficult. And, if you’d like to bend space and time to lay 
out your forms with CSS, we’ll gladly get out of your way and look on in 
admiration. However, many forms are tabular in their layout, so why not use 
tables to do the layout of your forms and let CSS do the styling? That way, 
we get the best of both worlds.
Let’s start with the layout...
We’ll start by getting the form into a table.  Check out the sketch below 
and you’ll see the form fits pretty nicely in a table, and even better, it looks 
like a form rather than a ragged collection of input elements.  Also notice 
that we’ve used a nested table in the “Ship to:” section.
Here’s the sketch of the table.  
It’s a simple table, with two 
columns and six rows - one row 
for each main section of the form.
We’ve thrown all the input 
elements into the right-hand 
column.
The Ship to: section has five text 
<input> elements, so we’ve grouped 
them into a nested table.  The 
nested table has the same basic 
layout as the main table: two 
columns and five rows, with one 
row for each label / element pair.
The labels for 
each form 
element go 
in the left 
column.
The cell on 
the left of 
the submit 
button is 
empty. There’s 
no label to 
put here.
Notice that we’ve grouped each 
set of checkboxes and radio 
buttons into one table data cell.
deciding how to style forms
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste should be provided for filling in field data. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields
pdf data extraction open source; how to save filled out pdf form in reader
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK package provides PDF field processing features for learn how to fill-in field data to PDF
c# read pdf form fields; filling out pdf forms with reader
xhtml forms
you are here 
627
<form action=”http://www.starbuzzcoffee.com/processorder.php” method=”POST”>
<table>
<tr>
<th>Choose your beans:</th>
<td>
<select name=”beans”>
<option value=”House Blend”>House Blend</option>
<option value=”Bolivia”>Shade Grown Bolivia Supremo</option>
<option value=”Guatemala”>Organic Guatemala</option>
<option value=”Kenya”>Kenya</option>
</select>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Type:</th>
<td>
<input type=”radio” name=”beantype” value=”whole” /> 
Whole bean
<br />
<input type=”radio” name=”beantype” value=”ground” checked=”checked” /> 
Ground
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Extras:</th>
<td>
<input type=”checkbox” name=”extras[]” value=”giftwrap” />
Gift wrap
<br />
<input type=”checkbox” name=”extras[]” value=”catalog” checked=”checked” />
Include catalog with order
</td>
</tr>
Ready Bake 
XHTML
Getting the form elements 
into a table
Now that you know how to organize the form elements in a table, you need to put 
your XHTML table writing skills to the test.  So get typing! 
Just kidding.  We wouldn’t make you type all this... after all, this chapter is really about 
forms, not tables.  We already typed this in for you; it’s in the file “styledform.html” 
in the “chapter14/starbuzz” folder.   Even though it looks complicated, it’s really not 
that bad.  We’ve added a few annotations below to point out the main parts.
Here’s the <form> element; 
we don’t need to put this 
part into the table.
Here’s where the table begins.  
Each of the main table 
rows has two data cells: a 
<th> for the label, and a 
<td> for the form element.
Each section of the form goes 
into a separate row.
For the bean selection menu, the “beantype” radio 
buttons, and the “extras” checkbox, we put all the 
form elements for each menu in one data cell.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form.
extract data from pdf to excel; how to save a pdf form in reader
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Studio .NET. Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET WinForms
export pdf form data to excel spreadsheet; exporting data from pdf to excel
628
Chapter 14
<tr>
<th>Ship to:</th>
<td>
<table>
<tr>
<td>Name:</td>
<td>
<input type=”text” name=”name” value=”” />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>Address:</td>
<td>
<input type=”text” name=”address” value=”” />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>City:</td>
<td>
<input type=”text” name=”city” value=”” />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>State:</td>
<td>
<input type=”text” name=”state” value=”” />
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>Zip:</td>
<td>
<input type=”text” name=”zip” value=”” />
</td>
</tr>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th>Customer Comments:</th>
<td>
<textarea name=”comments” rows=”10” cols=”48”></textarea>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<th></th>
<td><input type=”submit” value=”Order Now” /></td>
</tr>
</table>
</form>
But for the shipping data, we are creating a nested table - a 
table in a data cell.  We did this so we could align the labels on 
each text <input> in the “Ship to” part of the form properly.
Here’s the end of the nested 
table for the shipping data.
And here are the rows in the 
main table with the <textarea> 
and submit <input> elements.
the xhtml, continued
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file.
flatten pdf form in reader; extracting data from pdf files
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET. Extract multiple types of image from PDF file in VB.NET, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. Support .NET
extract pdf data into excel; how to fill in a pdf form in reader
xhtml forms
you are here 
629
Test driving a very tabular form
Open “styledform.html” in your browser and take a look at the Starbuzz 
Bean Machine form in table format.  It looks better, doesn’t it?  All the labels 
and form elements are aligned, and it looks more professional.  
Now, we can use CSS to make it look even better, by tweaking some things 
here and there.  Let’s take a look at what you might want to change.
We’ll do some basic styling that you’re well 
familiar with by now, like changing the 
font, and adding a background color.
Notice how 
the rows are a 
little too close 
together?  We 
can add space 
between the cells 
in the rows so 
the form is easier 
to read.
A border around the 
table would look nice.
We can align all these 
labels to the right 
so they line up nicely 
against the form 
elements.
We can also align the 
labels and the form 
elements vertically 
so they both align 
to the top of the 
data cells.
Finally, we’ll add just 
a bit of space on the 
left side of the body.
VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form
VB.NET Demo Code: Add Form Fields to an Existing PDF File. The demo code below can help you to add form fields to PDF file in VB.NET class.
how to fill out pdf forms in reader; how to save pdf form data in reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Flatten form fields. JavaScript actions. Private data of other applications. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
exporting pdf data to excel; exporting data from excel to pdf form
630
Chapter 14
Styling the form and the table with CSS
body {
background: #efe5d0 url(images/background.gif) top left;
font-family: Verdana, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
margin: 20px;
}
table {
border: thin dotted #7e7e7e;
padding: 10px;
}
th {
text-align: right;
vertical-align: top;
padding-right: 10px;
padding-top: 2px;
}
td {
vertical-align: top;
padding-bottom: 15px;
}
table table {
border: none;
padding: 0px;
}
table table td {
text-align: right;
padding-bottom: 0px;
}
We just need to add a few styling rules to the XHTML, and we’ll be done.  
Because this form is part of the Starbuzz site, we’re going to reuse the style in the 
“starbuzz.css” style sheet, and create a new style sheet, “styledform.css”, to add 
new style rules for the Bean Machine form.  All of this CSS should be familiar to 
you now.  We’re not using any rules unique to tables or forms; it’s all just the same 
stuff you’ve been using in the last few chapters.
You’ll find this CSS in the file “styledform.css” in the folder “chapter14/starbuzz”. 
We’re going to rely on the Starbuzz CSS for some of our style, 
but we’re changing the body font to a sans-serif font, adding the 
Starbuzz background image, and adding a margin to the body.
These font properties 
will be inherited by all 
the elements on the page, 
including the text in the 
table and the form.
We’re adding a border around the table, 
and some padding between the table 
content and the border.
The form labels are in the table headings.  We want to align 
these to the top and right so they align nicely with the 
form elements in the right column. We’re also adding a bit 
of padding to give them a little bit more space.
The content of the data cells is already aligned 
to the left by default, which is what we want, 
but we have to align them vertically too, to 
match the table headings. We’re adding a bit of 
padding here too, to add space between the rows.
These two rules override some of the other properties we set 
in the rules for table and td above.  Why?  Because we don’t 
want the nested table to have a border, and we want the 
spacing to be tighter, so we’re removing the padding.  We also 
need to align the form labels in the nested data cells to the 
right (those aren’t in table headings, like the others are, so 
they’re not aligned with the th rule above).
Ready Bake 
CSS
styling the form
xhtml forms
you are here 
631
The final test drive
You’re going to add two 
<link>
elements to the 
<head>
of 
your XHTML in “styledform.html”, linking in the Starbuzz style 
sheet from Chapter 12, “starbuzz.css”, and your new style sheet, 
“styledform.css”. Make sure you get the order correct: link the 
“starbuzz.css” file first, then the “styledform.css”.  Once you’ve got the 
two style sheets linked, save and reload your page.  You should see the 
snazzy, styled version of the Starbuzz Bean Machine in your browser.
Wow, what a difference a little style makes!
The labels are 
aligned with the 
top of the form 
elements, and 
they’re aligned 
to the right as 
well.  This alignment 
makes it easier to 
see which labels 
belong with which 
controls.
The space between 
the rows makes a 
big difference and 
makes the form 
much easier to read. 
The bean machine form now matches 
the rest of the Starbuzz site.
Notice that the 
nested table 
doesn’t have a 
border, and the 
spacing is tighter; 
that’s because 
of those rules 
that override the 
properties set for 
the main table.
If you want to stretch your 
XHTML and CSS skills a bit, see if 
you can add the Starbuzz header 
and footer to the Bean Machine 
page and make the Bean Machine 
look really nice with those elements.  
632
Chapter 14
What more could possibly go into a form?
We’ve covered just about everything you’ll regularly use in your 
forms, but there’s a few more elements you might want to consider 
adding to your form répertoire; so, we’re including them here just in 
case you want to take your own form studies even further.
When your forms start getting large, it can be helpful to visually group 
elements together.  While you might use 
<div>
s and CSS to do this, 
XHTML also provides a <fieldset> element that can be used to 
group together common elements. <fieldset> makes use of a second 
element, called <legend>. Here’s how they work together:
Fieldsets and legends
So far you’ve been labeling your form elements with simple text, but 
XHTML also provides a 
<label>
element. This element provides 
further information about the structure of your page, allows you to 
style your labels using CSS more easily, and can even help screen 
readers for the visually impaired correctly identify form elements.  
Labels
Here’s how the fieldset 
and legend look in one 
browser. You’ll find 
that browsers display 
them differently.
<input type=”radio” name=”hotornot” value=”hot” id=”hot” />
<label for=”hot”>hot</label>
<input type=”radio” name=”hotornot” value=”not” id=”not” />
<label for=”not”>not</label>
<fieldset>
<legend>Condiments</legend>
<input type=”checkbox” name=”spice” value=”salt” />
Salt  <br />
<input type=”checkbox” name=”spice” value=”pepper” />
Pepper <br />
<input type=”checkbox” name=”spice” value=”garlic” />
Garlic
</fieldset>
The <fieldset> element surrounds a 
set of input elements.
The <legend> provides a 
label for the group.
Labels don’t look 
different from just 
plain text, by default. 
However, they can make 
a big difference when it 
comes to accessibility.
To use a <label> element, first add an 
id attribute to your form element.
Then add a <label> and set its “for” 
attribute to the corresponding id.
You can use a <label> 
element with any 
form element.
other form elements
xhtml forms
you are here 
633
Here’s a whole new input element we haven’t talked about.  If  
you need to send an entire file to a Web application, you’ll once 
again use the 
<input>
element, but this time set its type to 
“file”.  When you do that, the 
<input>
element creates a control 
that allows you to select a file and – when the form is submitted 
– the contents of the file are sent with the rest of your form data 
to the server.  Remember, your Web application will need to 
be expecting a file upload, and also note that you must use the 
POST method to use this element.
File input
The password 
<input>
element works just like the text 
<input>
element, except that the text you type is masked.  This 
is useful for forms that require you to type in a password, a secret 
code, or other sensitive information that you may not want other 
people to see as you type.  Keep in mind, however, that the 
form data is not sent from the browser to the Web application 
in a secure way, unless you make it secure. For more on security, 
contact your hosting company.
Passwords
This isn’t a new element, but a new way to use an element you 
already know.  If you add the attribute 
multiple
with a value 
of “multiple” to your 
<select>
element, you turn your single 
choice menu into a multiple choice menu.  Instead of a pop-
down menu, you’ll get a multiple choice menu that shows all 
the options on the screen (with a scrollbar if there are a lot of 
them); you can choose more than one by holding down the Ctrl 
(Windows) or Command (Mac) key as you select.
Multiple selection
<input 
type=”password” name=”secret” />
<select name=”characters” multiple=”multiple”>
<option value=”Buckaroo”>Buckaroo Banzai</option>
<option value=”Tommy”>Perfect Tommy</option>
<option value=”Penny Priddy”>Penny</option>
<option value=”New Jersey”>Jersey</option>
<option value=”John Parker”>John</option>
</select>
<input 
type=”file” name=”doc” />
The password <input> element works 
exactly like the text <input> element, 
except the text you type is masked.
Here’s what the file input 
element looks like in a couple 
of different browsers.
To create a file input element, just set the 
type of the <input> element to “file”.
Just add the attribute 
multiple with a value of 
“multiple” to turn a single 
selection menu into a multiple 
selection menu.
With multiple 
selection, you 
can choose more 
than one option 
at a time.
634
Chapter 14
The <form> element 
n
defines the form, and all 
form input elements are nested inside it.
The action attribute contains the URL of the 
n
Web Application.
The method attribute contains the method of 
n
sending the form data: either POST or GET.
A POST packages form data and sends it as 
n
part of the request.
A GET packages form data and appends it to 
n
the URL.
Use POST when the form data should be 
n
private, or when it is large, such as when a 
<textarea> or file <input> element is used.
Use GET for requests that might be 
n
bookmarked.
The <input> element can act as many different 
n
input controls on the Web page, depending on 
the value of its “type” attribute.
A type of “text” creates a single line text input.
n
A type of “submit” creates a submit button.
n
A type of “radio” creates one radio button. All 
n
radio buttons with the same name make up a 
group of mutually exclusive buttons.
A type of “checkbox” creates one checkbox 
n
control. You can create a set of choices by 
giving multiple checkboxes the same name.
A <textarea> element  creates a multi-line text 
n
input area.
A <select> element creates a menu, which 
n
contains one or more <option> elements. 
<option> elements define the items in the 
menu.
If you put text into the content of a <textarea> 
n
element, it will become the default text in a 
text area control on the Web page.
The value attribute in the text <input> element 
n
can be used to give a single-line text input an 
initial value.
Setting the value attribute on a submit button 
n
changes the text of the button.
When a Web form is submitted, the form data 
n
values are paired with their corresponding 
names, and all names and values are sent to 
the server.
Tables are often used to layout forms, given 
n
that forms have a tabular structure. Once laid 
out, CSS should be used to style forms to 
provide the presentation, including color, font 
styles, etc.
XHTML allows form elements to be organized 
n
with the <fieldset> element.
The <label> element can be used to attach 
n
labels to form elements in a way that aids 
accessibility.
BULLET POINTS
review of forms
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested