c# pdf to image free : How to fill pdf form in reader SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn Head_First_HTML_CSS_XHTML67-part809

leftovers
you are here 
645
#5 Client-side Scripting
HTML pages don’t have to be passive documents; they can also have content that is executable. 
Executable content gives your pages behavior. You create executable content by writing 
programs or scripts using a scripting language. While there are a quite a few scripting 
languages that work with browsers, JavaScript is the reigning king. Here’s a little taste of what it 
means to put executable content into your pages.
<script type=”text/javascript”>
function validBid(form) { 
if (form.bid.value > 0) return true;
else return false;
}
</script>
Here’s a new HTML element, 
<script>, which allows you to write 
code right inside of HTML. Notice 
we’ve set the type to JavaScript.
And here’s a bit of JavaScript script 
that checks a user’s bid to make sure 
it’s not zero dollars or less.
Then in XHTML, you can create a form that uses this script to check the bid before the 
form is submitted. If the bid is more than zero, the form gets submitted.
<form onsubmit=”return validBid(this);” method=”post” action=”contest.php”>
Here’s a new attribute in the form 
called onsubmit that invokes a script 
when the submit button is pressed.
What else can scripting do?
As you see above, form input validation is a common and useful task that is often done with 
JavaScript (and the types of validation you can do go far beyond this example). But that’s just 
the beginning of what you can do with JavaScript. JavaScript actually has access to the entire 
document tree of elements (the same element tree you worked with in Chapter 3) and can 
programatically change values and elements in the tree. What does that mean? It means you 
can have a script change various aspects of your Web page based on a user’s actions. Here 
are a few things you might do with JavaScript:
Create an interactive game, like a crossword puzzle.
n
Dynamically change images as the user passes their 
n
mouse over the image.
Set local information in the user’s browser so you can 
n
remember them next time they visit.
Let users choose between different stylings of a page.
n
Display a random quote from a set of quotes.
n
Display the number of shopping days before Christmas.
n
How to fill pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
extract data from pdf file to excel; html form output to pdf
How to fill pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
how to fill pdf form in reader; how to save a filled out pdf form in reader
646
Appendix
#6 Server-side Scripting
Many Web pages aren’t created by hand, but are generated by Web applications running on 
a server. For example, think about an online order system where a server is generating pages 
as you step through the order process. Or, an online forum, where there’s a server generating 
pages based on forum messages that are stored in a database somewhere.  We used a Web 
application to process the form you created in Chapter 14 for the Starbuzz Bean Machine.
Many hosting companies will let you create your own Web applications by writing server-side 
scripts and programs. Here’s a few things server-side scripting will allow you to do:
Build an online store complete with products, a shopping cart, and an order system.
n
Personalize your pages for each user based on their preferences.
n
Deliver up to date news, events, and information.
n
Allow users to search your site directly.
n
Allow your users to help build the content of your site.
n
To create Web applications, you’ll need to know a server-side scripting or programming 
language. There are a lot of competing languages for Web development and you’re likely to get 
differing opinions on which language is best depending on who you ask. In fact, Web languages 
are a little like automobiles: you can drive anything from a Yugo to a Hummer, and each has its 
own strengths and weaknesses (cost, ease of use, size, economy, and so on).
Web languages are constantly evolving; PHP, Python, Perl, Ruby on Rails, and JavaServer 
Pages (JSPs) are all commonly used. If you’re new to programming, PHP may be the 
easiest language to start with, and there are millions of PHP-driven Web pages, so you’d 
be in good company. If you have some programming experience, you may want to try 
JSPs. If you’re more aligned with the Microsoft technologies, then you’ll want to look at 
VB.NET and ASP.NET as a server-side solution. 
Here are a few books that can get you started:
Lynn Beighley & Michael Morrison
A Brain-Friendly Guide
Head First
PHP & MySQL
Load all the key  
syntax directly  
into your brain
Avoid  
embarrassing
mishaps with  
web forms
Flex your scripting
knowledge with dozens  
of exercises
Discover the secrets 
behind dynamic,  
database-driven sites
Hook up your  
PHP and
MySQL code
A Brain-Friendly Guide
Bryan Basham, Kathy Sierra & Bert Bates
Updated to cover  
the latest version of  
the SCWCD exam  
for J2EE 1.4
Fool around 
 in the Custom  
Tag Library
Use c:out to get your  
message to the world
Head First
Servlets & JSP
Passing the Sun Certified Web Component Developer ExamTM
Learn how Ted improved his 
appeal with dynamic attributes
Avoid deadly 
traps & gotchas 
on the 1.4 exam
Test yourself  
with more than  
200 realistic  
exam questions 
2nd 
Edition
New Mock Exam 
Included
generating pages
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
extract data from pdf form; extract table data from pdf to excel
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
A professional PDF form filler control able to be integrated in Visual Studio .NET WinForm and fill in PDF form use C# language.
save data in pdf form reader; extract pdf data into excel
leftovers
you are here 
647
#7 Tuning for Search Engines
Many users will find your site through search engines (like Google and Yahoo!). In some cases you 
may not want your site to be listed in the search engine rankings, and you can use XHTML to 
request that they not be listed. But, in other cases, you’ll want to do everything you can to tune your 
site so it appears high in the rankings when particular terms are searched for. Here are some general 
tips for improving the search engine results for your pages.  But keep in mind that every search 
engine works differently and each considers different factors when deciding the order of its rankings.
Improving your rankings
Search engines use a combination of the words and phrases in your pages in their search rankings. 
To improve your rankings and help search engines determine what your page is about, start with two 
<meta>
tags in your 
<head>
element: one to list keywords and the other to provide a description 
of your content.  A keyword is a simple word or two that describes your site, like “coffee” or “travel 
journal”.
<meta name=”description” content=”This would be your description of what 
is on your page. Your most important keyword phrases should appear in this 
description.” />
<meta name=”keywords” content=”keyword phrase 1, keyword phrase 2, keyword 
phrase 3, etc.” />
Many search engines treat the words in your headings and the 
alt
and 
title
attributes with more 
weight than the rest of your text, so be sure to write concise and meaningful text in these elements 
and attributes.
Finally, many search engines factor in the number of links to your site from other sites; the more sites 
that link to you, the more important your site must be. So, anything you can do to encourage others 
to link to your site can improve your search engine rankings.
How do I keep my site from being listed?
You can request that search engines ignore your pages, but there is no guarantee that all of them will. 
The only way to truly prevent others from finding your site is to make it private (discuss that with your 
hosting company). But if you want to request that your site not be listed, which works with most of the 
major search engines, just put a 
<meta>
tag in the head of your XHTML, like this:
<meta name=”robots” content=”noindex,nofollow” />
This meta tag tells search engines 
to ignore this page, and any other 
pages on the same site that this 
page happens to link to.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; online form pdf output
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
change font size pdf form reader; pdf data extraction
648
Appendix
#8 More about Style Sheets for Printing
As you saw in Chapter 10, you can use the 
media
attribute of the 
<link>
element 
to specify an alternative media type. If you specify a value of “print” in the 
media
attribute of a style sheet, then that style sheet is used when your page is printed. 
Here’s how you use the 
<link>
element to do that:
<link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” media=”print” href=”forprint.css” />
The media attribute on the link 
element tells the browser that it 
should use this style sheet when it 
prints the Web page.
Here’s the link to the print 
stylesheet.  This won’t be used 
when your Web page is viewed on 
a monitor; it will only be used 
when you use the browser to 
print your Web page.
Then, as you’ve already seen, when a user visits your page and selects the browser’s 
print function, the browser applies the “forprint.css” style sheet before the page is 
printed. This allows you to style your pages so they are more appropriate for the 
printed page. Here are a few considerations to keep in mind when developing styles 
for print:
Change your background color to white for areas of printed text to make the 
n
text easier to read on the printed page.
You can specify font sizes in points rather than pixels, percentages, or ems 
n
in your print style sheet.  Points are designed specifically for printed text.  A 
typical point size for most fonts is 12pt.
While sans-serif fonts are easier to read on the screen, serif fonts are 
n
considered easier to read on the printed page.  You can use your print style 
sheet to change the font-family too.
If you have navigation menus, sidebars, or other content around the main 
n
content of the page, you can hide those elements for the printed version of the 
page if they are not essential for understanding the main content. This can be 
done by setting the display property on any element to “none”.
If you have positioned elements in your Web page, you may want to consider 
n
removing the positioning properties so your page prints the content in a top-
down manner that makes the most sense when reading the content.
If you have set specific widths for elements in your Web page, you might have 
n
to change those to flexible widths using margins or other methods.  If your 
Web page has a specific width, then it may not fit properly on the printed page. 
The key to making good print style sheets is to look at the primary content of the page, 
and make sure that this content prints clearly, fits on the printed page, and is easy to 
read.  The best way to know if your Web page will look good when it’s printed out is to 
test your print style sheet by printing the page.
better printing with css
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
extract data from pdf to excel; how to fill pdf form in reader
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
make pdf form editable in reader; extracting data from pdf files
leftovers
you are here 
649
#9 Pages for Mobile Devices
Do you want your Web pages to be usable on mobile devices, like cell phones and personal 
digital assistants (PDAs)?  If you do, then you need to keep some things in mind when creating 
your pages.  While mobile devices are getting more sophisticated, their support for XHTML 
and CSS still varies widely among the various devices.  Some support CSS, some don’t; some 
display XHTML really well, others make a mess of it.  The best thing you can do is anticipate 
potential problems and plan for the future when support will be better.
First, remember that you can write a “handheld” specific style sheet by using the 
media
attribute of the 
<link>
element.
<link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” media=”handheld” href=”formobile.css” />
And while support may currently be limited, if you get in the habit now of writing 
alternative style sheets for the “handheld” media type, you’ll be well prepared for the 
future when there’s more support for them. 
Remember that many mobile services still charge by the amount of data 
n
transmitted to the device.  This is a good reason to write simple, correct 
XHTML and use CSS to style your Web pages.  
Keep navigation simple and obvious.  That means you should use text links 
n
and avoid special scripting effects that require a mouse and keyboard to use.
Scale down your page as much as you can.  If you have a handheld style sheet, 
n
use it to reduce your font sizes, margins and padding as much as possible.  
Keep in mind that your multi-column layouts will often be ignored on small 
n
devices, so pay careful attention to the ordering of elements in your XHTML.
Many mobile devices lack support for frames and pop-up windows, so avoid 
n
these.
Finally, the best solution is always to test your Web pages on as many devices 
n
as you can to know how they truly perform on small devices.
Unfortunately, support for the “handheld” style sheet media type is still limited, so 
even if you’ve got a handheld style sheet link in your Web page, that doesn’t mean 
the browser on your phone will actually use it.  So, you need to keep some general 
design techniques in mind so your Web page looks good on both computer 
monitors and small devices:
To create a style 
sheet for mobile 
devices, use the media 
attribute with a 
value of “handheld”.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
flatten pdf form in reader; how to extract data from pdf to excel
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
pdf data extraction open source; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
650
Appendix
#10 Blogs
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN” 
“http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd”>
<html xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml” xml:lang=”en” lang=”en”>
<head>
<title><$BlogPageTitle$></title>
<$BlogMetaData$>
<style type=”text/css”>
body {
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
text-align: center;
color: #554;
background: #689C54 url(http://www.blogblog.com/dots_dark/bg_minidots.gif) top center repeat;
font-family: “Lucida Grande”, lucida, helvetica, sans-serif;
font-size: small;
}
.
.
.
</style>
</head>
<body>
.
.
.
</body>
</html>
Weblogs –  or “blogs” as they are commonly known – are like personal Web pages, except 
they are written in journal style, like Tony’s Web journal.  Many people who create blogs 
use online services that take care of the details of managing the blog entries. These services 
also provide pre-made templates that allow you to pick from a variety of looks for your blog.  
They offer different background colors, font styles, and even background images you can use.  
But they also allow you to customize your blog template and create your own unique look for 
your blog, with, you guessed it – XHTML and CSS.  
Here’s a snippet of XHTML and CSS from the blog template of a popular online blogging 
service, Blogger.com.  As you can see, they’re using all the same elements and properties 
you’ve learned about in this book.  And they’re even on top of the new standards: their 
templates use XHTML 1.0 Strict, so it’s a good thing you’ve learned how to write strict 
XHTML, right?  Let’s take a closer look...
This blogging service uses XHTML 1.0 
Strict, so here’s the DOCTYPE and 
<html> attributes you’ve seen before.
These <$...$>s are template variables; they are filled in with 
the name of your blog and other content when you create 
your blog, and whenever you add a new post.  You should 
leave these variables like they are, as they’re needed to 
correctly display your blog content.
Here’s the top of the style sheet that gives your blog its look.  
This template is removing the margins and padding from the 
body, giving the text a default color, putting an image in the 
background of the page, and setting font properties.
There are lots more style rules here.  Each style 
rule controls things like the font used for your 
blog entries, the headings, the colors,... in other 
words, all the same stuff you’re used to styling now.
The XHTML contains all the parts you need for 
your blog: headings, entries, dates, etc.  Each 
content area will also have a <$...$> variable for 
plugging in the content from your post.
better looking blogs
this is the index
651
Index
g
h
g
Symbols
!important  477
#d2b48c (color in hex code)  32
&amp; entity  114, 272
& character  114, 272
&gt; entity  114
&lt; entity  114
.. (dot dot) notation  64, 65
/* and */  315
:8000 port  147
<!-- and --> (see comments)
< character  114
> character  114
[ ] (square brackets)  617
{ } braces  331
A
absolute layout  526
versus floating layout  530–531
absolute paths  138–139
versus relative paths  139
absolute positioning  519–526, 532, 542
accessibility
alt attribute  176, 255
forms  632, 634
linking  149, 161
scaling fonts using pixels  355
table summaries  557
action attribute  596, 597
<a> element  47–49
destination anchors  151–155
frames  642
href attribute (see href attribute)
new window  157–159
rendering in browser  49–50
state  468–470
strict HTML 4.01  254
target attribute  158–159
title attribute  149
(see also linking)
alt attribute  176, 237
images  255
anchors  151–155
finding  153
name  154
anti-aliasing  213
ASP  646
attributes  51–52
Attributes Exposed  53
order  155
required  255
selectors  640
supported  52
Attributes Exposed  53
B
background-color property  289, 367–368, 399
tables  566
background-image property  404–408, 447
background-position property  406, 407
background-repeat property  406, 407, 447
background property  459
backups  127
backwards compatibility of XHTML with HTML  276
Behind the Scenes
browsers and images  167–168
default pages  141
HTML links  48–50
blink decoration  377
the index
652
index
block elements
flow  488–489, 493–494, 542
strict HTML 4.01  253–254
versus inline elements  94–97
<blockquote> element  89–92, 94
multiple paragraphs  92
nested  362
nesting <q> inside  92
strict HTML 4.01  254
Blogger.com  650
blogs  650
body  23, 32
<body> element  23, 82–83
font size  358
strict HTML 4.01  253
border-bottom-color property  411
border-bottom-style property  411
border-bottom-width property  411
border-bottom property  295, 296
border-collapse property  564
border-color property  399, 411, 412
border-left-color property  411
border-left-style property  411
border-left-width property  411
border-right-color property  411
border-right-style property  411
border-right-width property  411
border-spacing property  562–563
Internet Explorer  563
border-style property  399, 410, 412
border-top-color property  411
border-top-style property  411
border-top-width property  411
border-width property  399, 411
border property  459, 560
borders  391–396, 400–401, 410–412
default sizes for keywords thin, medium,  
and thick  412
<div> element  440
boxes, flow  488–497
box model  391–396
borders (see borders)
content area (see content area)
margins (see margins)
padding (see padding)
<br> element  98–101, 145
XHTML 1.0 Strict  275
Browser Exposed  228
browsers
automatically resizing images  182
choices  16
default sizes for keywords thin, medium, and  
thick  412
determining good design across various  358
directories versus files  140
display  6
<form> element  595
forms
GET  620–621
POST  620–621
text limitations  607
headings, default sizes  358
how forms work  593
images  166–168
<img> element  166–168
imperfect HTML  225
links (see <a> element)
opening HTML files  19
pixel dimensions  182
quick overview  2–3
resizing fonts  358
standards compliant code  229
tables  553
URLs  135–136 
Bullet Points
<a> element  69
block elements  117
borders  424
content area  424
CSS properties  331
<div> element  482
fonts
color  379
families  379
size  379
style  379
forms  634
FTP  161
the index
you are here 
653
hex codes  379
HTML 4.01  261
<img> element  214
inline elements  117
JPEG versus GIF  214
layouts  542
linking  69, 161
lists  117, 581
margins  424
padding  424
positioning  542
pseudo-classes  482
relative paths  69
<span> element  482
style sheets  424
tables  581
tags  36
URLs  161
W3C validator  261
C
caption-side property  560
cascading style sheets (see CSS)
cd command (FTP)  132
cell phones  649
cells
border-collapse property  564
border-spacing property  562–563
characters (see special characters)
checkboxes  599, 607, 615
child elements  454
classes  317–321, 331
adding elements to  317
adding style  399–415
Class Exposed  414–415
creating  399
creating selectors for  318, 320
elements of multiple classes  321
pseudo-classes  468–471, 482
Class Exposed  414–415
.classname  331
clear property  511, 542
closing tag  25, 26
color  363–376
background-color property  367–368
hex codes  369–371
shorthand  373
online color chart  373
Photoshop Elements, Color Picker  372
selecting good font color  373
specifying  366–368
by hex value  369, 372
by name  367
by rgb values  368, 372
specifying in CSS  32
text  341
Web-safe colors  373
Web colors
finding  372–373
how they work  364–365
color property  292, 294, 343
colspan attribute  571
columns, spanning  568–571
comments  6
CSS comments  315
compliance  251
compliant HTML  229–230
conflicting properties  322–323
Content-Type  240
content area
<div> element, width  442–446
content attribute  240
content versus style  34–35
copyright symbol  114
CSS  285–340, 473–482
adding into XHTML  291
body  32
box model  391–396
classes  317–321, 331
.classname  331
color  32
comments  315
font families  347
how name came about  480
id attribute  417
laying out forms
tables versus CSS  624–625
precedence  479
properties (see properties (CSS))
the index
654
index
CSS (continued)
using with XHTML  289, 290
validating  328–329
versus HTML  32, 34–35
versus XHTML  324–325
.css file  303
lounge.css file
creating  304
linking  305
CSS Up Close
background-image property  406–407
background-position property  406
background-repeat property  406
Cursive font family  345
Cyberduck  134
D
data transfer  127
default font  388
default pages  140–141
descendants  452–454
design
determining good design across various  
browsers  358
Tony’s Journal  79–83
destination anchors  151–155
finding  153
name  154
dir command (FTP)  133
directories versus files in browsers  140
<div> element  432–457, 482
borders  440
descendants  452–454
float property  504–505
heading color  455
height  446
id attribute  434
labelling  434
line-height property  456
logical sections  433
marking sections  434
nested  436
structure  436
style  435, 441, 447–449 
text-align property  447–449
width  442–446
dividing pages into logical sections (see <div> element)
DOCTYPE  231, 240
moving from transitional to strict  243–251
Transitional HTML 4.01  235–237
tentatively valid HTML 4.01 Transitional  238
Transitional XHTML  272
XHTML 1.0 Strict  268
domain name
hosting  127
obtaining  128
registration services  129
versus Web site name  129
why it’s called  129
dot dot (..) notation  64, 65
double quotes  86
Dreamweaver  16, 644
E
elements  25, 36
adding to classes  317
attributes  29
block (see block elements)
capitalization  251
empty  101
strict HTML 4.01  254
floated  542
inline  117
strict HTML 4.01  253–254
members of multiple classes  321
multiple selectors matching element  322
nesting  109–111
pseudo-elements  640
state  468–470
em, font size scaling factor  353
versus percentage (%)  358
Emacs  644
<embed> element  643
<em> element  315
empty elements  101
<img> element  175
strict HTML 4.01  254
XHTML 1.0 Strict  275
example files  xxxiii
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested