c# pdf to image free : Extracting data from pdf to excel software application project winforms html asp.net UWP how-to-create-successful-html-email-newsletters4-part879

Offers – such as workshops, seminars, webinars, online courses, and discounts on 
products. 
Web links – to more useful information including partner web sites. 
Contests – to promote a product or to gather new email addresses. 
There is no secret success formula for an email newsletter outline. You will need to 
develop one that you are comfortable with.  The reality is that you will choose a 
structure and then fine tune it as time goes by. Check out the alternative outlines used in 
the email newsletters you receive in your inbox.  Here are some alternatives: 
ɸ
Opinion feature 
ɸ
Letter from the editor 
ɸ
Trends/analyses 
ɸ
Monthly spotlight feature 
ɸ
Product/industry news 
ɸ
How-to articles 
ɸ
Reader involvement columns 
ɸ
Book reviews 
ɸ
News flashes 
ɸ
Interviews 
ɸ
Revenue opportunities – Monthly specials 
And here’s another one to consider: 
ɸ
Featured Article 
ɸ
Useful Website Pick 
ɸ
Reader Q&A 
ɸ
Letter to the Editor 
ɸ
Surveys or Polls 
ɸ
Product Reviews 
ɸ
Tip of the Day 
ɸ
Inspirational Quote 
The format that you adopt and the type of material you include in your email newsletter 
is as endless as your imagination. The key is choosing a format that works for your 
subscribers as they are the final judges. 
Towards a Good Read 
41 
Extracting data from pdf to excel - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
how to save pdf form data in reader; how to fill out a pdf form with reader
Extracting data from pdf to excel - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
pdf data extraction open source; extracting data from pdf files
Go in Circles 
The cliché: going in circles, usually speaks to some kind of inefficiency.  But when it 
comes to writing, going in circles is a must. You can’t write effectively without using a 
recursive (circular) process. 
Before you prepare the final draft of your email newsletter, you will need to go in 
“circles” to make sure that your document is clear, logical, and compelling. The process 
of writing a newsletter is a circular one in that you write, edit, revise and re-write to the 
point where you may believe you’ll never finish. Other than spelling and grammar 
check, no software can really help you through this circular process. It is basically you 
and the words.  You must read and re-write and you must do good proofreading
9
(or 
have someone do it for you). 
You need to recognize up front that writing the newsletter is work but there are a few 
short cuts to writing a good one. You must put in the time and effort to produce a 
polished and effective email newsletter. It will take many hours of thinking, analyzing, 
researching, writing, revising, editing, and re-writing till you get it right.  
Hypertext Structure 
A number of successful email newsletters use the Hypertext structure. This is a format 
with short text sections that serve as introductions to longer text passages or articles. 
Although short text sections are used and initially displayed, there is no sacrificing 
depth of content. All that is done with hypertext structure is a splitting of the 
information into multiple nodes or sections, all connected by hypertext links.  
Each initial introductory text can be brief and yet the full hypertext version can contain 
much more information. Long and detailed background information can be linked to 
secondary sections – much like is done on retail web sites like Amazon.com where 
additional information links offer supplementary information. This makes it possible to 
allow readers to select those topics they care about and click to those sections where 
they want more information. 
42 
9
See the proofreading checklist in the Appendix. 
Towards a Good Read 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe PDF document in C#.NET class. Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats.
extract data from pdf file; using pdf forms to collect data
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# programming sample for extracting all images from PDF. // Open a document. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page.
how to fill out pdf forms in reader; extract data from pdf using java
Figure 6.1 shows the hyperlink structure used in the ACD email newsletter. It uses a 
form of the hypertext structure by giving only an introduction to its articles. The user 
can click “more” to read more text beyond the introduction. 
Figure 6.1 Hypertext Structure: ADC Digital Imaging Blast email newsletter 
Towards a Good Read 
43 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide. Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc. Free PDF document
extract data from pdf into excel; extract data from pdf forms
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
flatten pdf form in reader; extract data from pdf form
Figure 6.2 netREPORTER email newsletter 
Figure 6.2 shows another use of the hypertext structure with the netREPORTER email 
newsletter. This publication uses a slightly different hypertext format from the ACD 
example (Figure 6.1). Yet the netREPORTER hypertext structure is very effective with 
“noteworthy” headlines serving as links to the stories/articles. 
Towards a Good Read 
44 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Sample for extracting all images from PDF in VB.NET program. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
export pdf form data to excel; pdf data extraction to excel
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
pdf form save in reader; fill in pdf form reader
Make it Skimmable 
Studies show that people skim text (as oppose to reading every word) on the Web or in 
an email. The same holds true for email newsletters. To make your email newsletter a 
“good read” for your subscribers, you need to make it easy for them to skim it. The 
following techniques should help your subscribers be successful “skimmers”: 
ɸ
Highlight keywords that you want to emphasize. Bold or other typeface 
variations are helpful.  Underlining is probably a no-no because it will 
confuse readers.  They may think it is a hyperlink.  Hyperlinks can serve 
as one form of highlighting and are useful when used sparingly. 
ɸ
Give lots of thought to writing meaningful headings. It is better to be 
straightforward and clear than to be "clever" or cute. 
ɸ
Put a benefit-oriented “deck” under your article title. A deck is a 
journalistic term for a sub headline. For example, if your headline is 10 
Common Myths about Snow Tires, your deck might be Get the right 
advice now, and drive safely this winter. 
ɸ
Make use of bulleted lists.  Bulleted lists are popular with readers and 
make it very easy for readers to move quickly through your thoughts. 
More on the use of bulleted lists in the next section. 
ɸ
Package” your articles as lists tips, myths, tricks, stories, warnings… 
Readers can’t resist what I call “text tools” — lists of facts or actions or 
insider tips they can put to work right away, or pin to their corkboards to 
have handy when needed. 10 Dangerous Myths about Snow Tires, Five 
Real-Life Investment Mistakes You Can Avoid — these are article titles 
that say read me or suffer the consequences. 
ɸ
Use principles of good writing such as one idea per paragraph. Layout 
your idea early in the paragraph. Readers will skip over additional ideas 
if you don’t grab them early with the first sentence or two of a 
paragraph. 
ɸ
Keep the word count down.  Just as you would do when writing an 
editorial for your newspaper, keep the word count of your email 
newsletter down.  One rule of thumb for newsletter writing states that 
you should “half the word count”. In other words, write about 1/2 as 
much as you would write for a more conventional piece of writing, such 
as a business report. Some people like to adhere to a 500-to-1000-word 
limit. Articles of that size are perfect for the email medium. 
ɸ
When a reader first opens your email newsletter, they should be able to 
quickly "get" what the page is about. That means the information should 
be visible without having to scroll too much. 
Towards a Good Read 
45 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are to load a PDF document from file or query data and save the PDF document.
how to save editable pdf form in reader; exporting data from excel to pdf form
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
functions to PDF document imaging application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF, extracting text from PDF, and so on
pdf form field recognition; how to fill pdf form in reader
Reading from computer monitor is tiring for the eyes. Some experts say that reading 
from a computer screen is about 25 percent slower than reading from paper. It is true 
that some people will print out your email newsletter to read at a later time.  However, 
many people will choose to read it on their monitor the moment that they open it. 
Therefore, think of ways that you can write and design your email newsletter to make it 
easy to read – skimmable by your subscribers. 
Using Bulleted Lists of Information 
Readers like bulleted lists. Use lists for presenting groups of related information 
ɸ
Short lines  
ɸ
Easy to skim  
ɸ
Organize related hyperlinks well  
Lists are short lines, and easy to skim. Since they break up nicely into chunks (one 
chunk per list item) they work well for organizing links to web resources. For many 
situations, they will work better than links scattered in a paragraph that must be read in 
context. For example, if you wanted to mention three great online retailers, these might 
come to mind: 
ɸ
Amazon.com www.amazon.com
ɸ
Lands End  www.landsend.com
ɸ
Best Buy www. bestbuy.com
Keep the items short. To keep the list skimmable, try to keep the length of each item in 
the list short. No more than two or three sentences.  
Writing Good Copy
10
When you’re creating a newsletter that hundreds or even thousands of people will read, 
it’s easy to forget that you have to write your copy for just one person — your reader. 
Here are seven tips to help you connect with your reader through good newsletter copy. 
10
This section was adapted from a piece written by Mark Scapicchio. Mark has written advertising and 
marketing copy for some of the best-known companies and advertising agencies in the world, and for 
many successful smaller companies.  To learn more about his background, his clients, and how he can 
improve your copy visit his Web site at www.scapicchio.com
Towards a Good Read 
46 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
NET application. Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF pages in C#.NET console class. Support .NET WinForms
collect data from pdf forms; extract data from pdf form fields
Use “You” 
When your reader opens your email newsletter, it’s just you your reader, one-on-one — 
like a private presentation without anyone else in the room. And you just can’t give an 
effective private presentation without using the word you. Your copy should be 
crawling with the word you, with forms of the word you (you’ll, your, you’re), and with 
imperatives, in which you is understood (see below for more on imperatives). At the 
very least, find a way to work you into your headline, your first subhead, and the first 
sentence of your body copy. Replace weak generics such as one (as in: When one 
considers the options), businesses and the competition with you, your business and your 
competitors. Write as if no one else in the world matters but the one person reading at 
any given instant. 
Emphasize Benefits over Features  
Whatever you write should be organized around benefits — the ways your product or 
service or company will improve your reader’s life. The features behind the benefits are 
exactly that: behind the benefits, playing a supporting role.  Suppose you’re writing an 
ad for your new laser printer, which is twice as fast as any other printer on the market. 
Your headline should tout the benefit of the speed, and not the speed itself: 
Print any document in half the time. 
Leave the feature to your body copy:  
SuperPrint’s new 50-page-per minute print engine cranks out your documents at 
least twice as fast as any printer you’re using today.  
Notice, by the way, that the “feature” sentence repeats the benefit. You can never repeat 
your benefits often enough. In fact, if you have extra space in your layout and have a 
choice between mentioning adding a lower-level feature or repeating an important 
benefit, repeat the benefit. Even on the back sides of your data sheets — where people 
expect to see bullet lists of features — group those features under benefits, repeated or 
otherwise. You’ll be giving your reader what he or she really wants. 
Towards a Good Read 
47 
Write Imperative Headlines and Subheads 
An imperative is a sentence in the form of a direct command, and in which the word 
you doesn’t appear but is “understood.” Get me a cup of coffee, Take off your shoes 
before you come in here, and Don’t forget to call me — these are all examples of 
imperatives. 
Imperatives are extremely powerful sentences — not because they’re the way we give 
orders (who are you to boss around your customers?) but because they’re the language 
of confident, expert, indispensable advice. We were raised on so much good advice 
given in the form of imperatives — Look both ways, Don’t talk to strangers, Buckle 
your seatbelt — that we’re practically hardwired to read them. That’s why mass-market 
ads are full of imperatives like Ask your doctor, Compare, and Just Do It. 
It’s easy to write irresistible imperative headlines and subheads: Just write sentences 
that tell your reader to take advantage of what you have to offer. Surf the Web up to 100 
times faster. Save thousands each year in maintenance costs. Email us TODAY for your 
free white paper. They don’t have to be fancy or clever; in fact, the more direct and 
more specific, the better.  
Replace Lone Nouns with Real Subheads. 
Single nouns — like Overview, Background, Features, Benefits, Challenge, and 
Summary — don’t cut it as subheads. These are the kinds of vague, emotionless words 
you’d expect from a court stenographer, not a copywriter. They may have helped your 
writer organize his or her thoughts, but they do absolutely nothing for your reader.  
In any copy — and particularly in longer copy — your subheads are as important as 
your headline. They should be active and compelling (and ideally, imperative) 
sentences — complete thoughts — that make the body copy beneath them seem much 
too important to skip. And subheads should also be specific enough that a skimming 
reader can read only your headline and your subheads and still get a basic understanding 
of your primary benefits and your call to action. 
Single, vague nouns can’t do all this work; in fact they can’t do anything but take up 
space. Never accept them from a copywriter. 
Towards a Good Read 
48 
Replace Can with Will and If with When 
If you’re not absolutely sure about your product or your offer, why should your reader 
believe you? In ad and marketing copy words like can and if signal doubt or 
qualifications or extenuating circumstances to your reader — and these are the last 
feelings you want to convey. 
You’ll make your copy confident and reassuring when you replace can with will and if 
with when. Consider the difference: We can install your new tires in one hour or less is 
a mere possibility; We will install your new tires in one hour or less is a promise (in 
fact, you almost expect it to be followed by a guarantee).  Get a free gift if you call 
today implies that you have another option; Get a free gift when you call today assumes 
you’ve already decided to make the call. 
Making these two simple replacements will take the doubt out of your copy — and the 
hesitation out of your reader’s mind. 
Avoid Jargon 
For years businesspeople used the word access as a verb — even as writers complained 
(not entirely correctly) that the dictionary listed it as a noun only. Today most 
dictionaries, including the latest Webster’s, list access as a verb. 
But that doesn’t mean you should use it in your copy. Like most bits of tech jargon that 
earn their way into accepted usage, access is about as colorful and emotional and 
inspiring as a wet gym towel. Most readers can’t picture themselves accessing 
something; those that can don’t see a very exciting or memorable picture. 
Instead of access, why not write instantly find and use, or locate precisely, or put your 
finger on? These are things people actually want to do, activities that imply a reward or 
some success. That’s why they make better copy. 
Access is just one example, no worse than populate or format or support. Each has at 
least one emotional, evocative and specific alternative, like enrich or transform or work 
perfectly with. Use the alternative in your copy whenever you can.   
Towards a Good Read 
49 
Replace the word Leading  
Want to torture a coworker? Tell her she can’t go home until she finds ten corporate 
Web sites — including your own — that don’t use the word leader or leading in its 
company description. (To be nice, have take-out delivered to her desk — she’ll be 
hungry later on.) 
Even before it became so completely overused, leader was a vague word that demanded 
qualification — and the equally overused qualifiers that emerged (market leader, 
industry-leader, value leader) aren’t much more specific.  
Now that practically everyone uses the word, calling yourself a leader makes you a 
follower; worse, it bores your reader to tears. Your copy needs to tell your reader why 
your company and products are different and better, and it can’t do this using the same 
words everyone else uses. Try to describe your company in a truly original way, using 
the word “you” if possible. Then you’ll be leading in the truest sense of the word.  
Write a Complete Call to Action 
There’s a rumor out there that your call to action can be as simple as your phone 
number and Web address placed under your logo.  The rumor is false. To get any 
response at all from your copy, your call to action must accomplish three things: 
ɸ
It has to recapitulate the primary benefit of your product or your offer. 
See for yourself how MultiLube can add years to the life of your car. 
ɸ
It has to tell your reader exactly how and when to respond. Call 1-800-
123-4567 TODAY for more information. 
ɸ
It should offer your reader an incentive for responding. An expert 
mechanic will answer all your questions. Or even better, The first 30 
callers will get a FREE one-quart sample — a $79.95 value. 
Omit one of these components and your response potential drops dramatically. Leave 
just a phone number, and you’ll be lucky to get a single call. 
Next time, write it right, right from the start.  Making any of these changes will improve 
your copy — the more of them you make, the more dramatic the improvement. 
But last-day fixes are no substitute for doing it right the first time. When you start with 
a solid command of the basics — and the preceding ten tips represent the very basics — 
Towards a Good Read 
50 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested