c# ghostscript pdf to image : Create pdf fillable form application software utility azure html .net visual studio tot-09110-part1020

Highlights
November 2009
Larger­Sized Aggregates
SAS Disk Storage
Top 5 Hyper­V Best Practices
Connect with Your Fellow Readers
Tech OnTap Archive
Top 5 Hyper­V Best Practices
 
Chaffie McKenna, Microsoft Reference Architect
 
The second release of Microsoft® Hyper­V™ is shipping with 
many new features and capabilities. NetApp best practices 
cover important new features as well as lessons learned from 
numerous deployments.
Learn how to configure networks, set appropriate iGroups and 
LUN types, avoid alignment problems, and configure CSVs.
More
Tips from the Trenches
Blogging with Dave
Q&A: Taking Disk Storage to the
Next Level with SAS
Doug Coatney, Storage Software Engineer
Chris Lueth, Technical Marketing Engineer
NetApp recently released its first 
SAS­based disk shelf with Storage 
Bridge Bay and out­of­band 
management. Find out why SAS 
disk technology is replacing FC. 
More
Dave Hitz
NetApp 
Founder 
and EVP
Cloud/Grid/Utility
At first, cloud computing 
was about how to not 
build a data center, but it 
quickly morphed into an 
architectural description 
of how you should build 
a data center.
Dave’s Blog 
Engineering Talk
Community Spotlight
An Introduction to Larger­Sized Aggregates 
Uday Boppana, Technical Marketing Engineer
Data ONTAP® 8.0 7­Mode supports 
bigger aggregates, called 64­bit 
aggregates. Read this technical 
report to learn about creating and 
managing them.
More
Connect With Your Fellow Readers
See what other Tech OnTap readers 
are talking about. Join our group in 
the NetApp Community and share 
your ideas and storage expertise.
Multimode VIF Survival Guide
Our resident network expert talks all 
about deploying high­performance 
Ethernet storage infrastructures, 
such as multimode VIFs.
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 1 of 10
Create pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
form pdf fillable; convert fillable pdf to html form
Create pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
acrobat fill in pdf forms; change font size in pdf fillable form
 
 
 
Top Five Hyper­V Best Practices 
By Chaffie McKenna, NetApp
Microsoft® Hyper­V™ virtualization technology has been shipping for more than a year. Tech OnTap 
profiled the use of Hyper­V with NetApp® technology in several past articles, including an overview 
article and a detailed case study of one customers experiences. 
NetApp has been involved with hundreds of Hyper­V deployments and has developed a detailed body 
of best practices for Hyper­V deployments on NetApp. Tech OnTap asked me to highlight the top five 
best practices for Hyper­V on NetApp, with special attention to the recently released Hyper­V Server 
2008 R2.
l
Network configuration 
l
Setting the correct iGroup and LUN protocol type 
l
Virtual machine disk alignment 
l
Using cluster shared volumes (CSVs) 
l
Getting the most from NetApp storage software and tools 
You can find full details on these items and much more in NetApp Storage Best Practices for 
Microsoft Virtualization which has been updated to include Hyper­V R2.
BP #1: Network Configuration in Hyper­V Environments
There are two important best practices to mention when it comes to network configuration:
l
Be sure to provide the right number of physical network adapters on Hyper­V servers. 
l
Take advantage of the new network features that Hyper­V R2 supports if at all possible. 
Physical network adapters. Failure to configure enough network connections can make it appear as 
though you have a storage problem, particularly when using iSCSI. Smaller environments require a 
minimum of two or three network adapters, while larger environments require at least four or five. You 
may require far more. Here’s why: 
l
Management. Microsoft recommends a dedicated network adapter for Hyper­V server 
management. 
l
Virtual machines. Virtual network configurations of the external type require a minimum of one 
network adapter. 
l
IP storage. Microsoft recommends that IP storage communication have a dedicated network, 
so one adapter is required and two or more are necessary to support multipathing. 
l
Windows failover cluster. Windows® failover cluster requires a private network. 
l
Live migration. This new Hyper­V R2 feature supports the migration of running virtual 
machines between Hyper­V servers. Microsoft recommends configuring a dedicated physical 
network adapter for live migration traffic. 
l
Cluster shared volumes. Microsoft recommends a dedicated network to support the 
communications traffic created by this new Hyper­V R2 feature. 
The following tables will help you choose the right number of physical adapters.
Table 1) Standalone Hyper­V servers.
Table 2) Clustered Hyper­V servers.
Read the Latest on Hyper­V and NetApp
Chaffie McKenna blogs regularly about all things 
Hyper­V and other topics related to Microsoft 
environments on her Microsoft Environments 
blog. 
Recent posts include: 
l
Is Hyper­V data center ready? 
l
Networking best practices 
l
Provisioning best practices 
  More 
Complete Hyper­V Best Practices
If you’re deploying Hyper­V with NetApp storage, 
access to the latest best practices information is 
indispensible. 
Download the latest detailed guides:
 NetApp Storage Best Practices for Microsoft 
Virtualization 
 NetApp Implementation Guide for Microsoft 
Virtualization  
New Windows Server 2008 R2 Networking 
Features 
Windows Server 2008 R2 adds important new 
capabilities that you should use in your Hyper­V 
environment if your servers and network 
hardware support them:
• Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum 
Offload (CSO). LSO and CSO are supported by 
the virtual networks in Hyper­V. In addition, if your 
physical network adapters support these 
capabilities, the virtual traffic is offloaded to the 
physical network as necessary. Most network 
adapters support LSO and CSO.
• Jumbo frames. With Windows 2008 R2, jumbo 
frame enhancements converge to support up to 
6 times the payload per packet. This makes a 
huge difference in overall throughput and 
reduces CPU utilization for large file transfers. 
Jumbo frames are supported on physical 
networks and virtual networks, including 
switches and adapters. For physical networks, 
all intervening network hardware (switches and 
so on) must have jumbo frame support enabled 
as well.
• TCP chimney. This allows virtual NICs in child 
partitions to offload TCP connections to physical 
adapters that support it, reducing CPU utilization 
and other overhead.
• Virtual machine queue. VMQ improves network 
throughput by distributing network traffic for 
multiple VMs across multiple processors, while 
reducing processor utilization by offloading 
Quick Links
netapp.com
Tech OnTap Archive
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 2 of 10
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
fillable pdf forms; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
create a fillable pdf form; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form
Table 2) Clustered Hyper­V servers.
Table 3) Clustered Hyper­V servers using live migration. 
Table 4) Clustered Hyper­V servers using live migration and CSV. 
New network features. Windows Server® 2008 R2 supports a number of new networking features. 
NetApp recommends configuring these features on your Hyper­V servers and taking advantage of 
them whenever possible. Be aware that some or all of them may not be supported by your server and 
network hardware. (See sidebar for details.)
BP #2: Selecting the Correct iGroup and LUN Protocol Type
When provisioning a NetApp LUN for use with Hyper­V, you must specify specific initiator groups 
(iGroups) and the correct LUN type. Incorrect settings can make deployment difficult and performance 
can suffer.
Initiator groups. FCP and iSCSI storage must be masked so that the appropriate Hyper­V server and 
virtual machines (VMs) can connect to them. With NetApp storage, LUN masking is handled by 
iGroups.
l
When dealing with individual Hyper­V servers or VMs, you should create an iGroup for each 
system and for each protocol (FC and iSCSI) that system uses to connect to the NetApp 
storage system. 
l
When dealing with a cluster of Hyper­V servers or VMs, you should create an individual iGroup 
for each protocol that the cluster of systems uses to connect to the NetApp storage system. 
It’s easier to manage iGroups by using NetApp SnapDrive®. SnapDrive cuts down on the confusion 
because it knows which OS you are using and automatically configures that setting for your iGroups.
LUN types. The LUN Protocol Type setting determines the on­disk layout of the LUN. It is important to 
specify the correct LUN type to make sure that the LUN aligns properly with the file system it contains. 
(See the following tip for an explanation.) This issue is not unique to NetApp storage. Any storage 
vendor or host platform may exhibit this problem.
Tip: The LUN type you specify depends on your OS, OS version, disk type, and Data ONTAP® version. 
For complete information on LUN types for different operating systems, refer to the Block Access 
Management Guide for your version of Data ONTAP.
The following tables will help you choose the correct LUN type.
Table 5) LUN types for use with Data ONTAP 7.3.1 and later.
reducing processor utilization by offloading 
packet classification to the hardware and 
avoiding both network data copy and route 
lookup on transmit paths. VMQ is compatible 
with most other task offloads, and therefore it 
can coexist with large send offload and jumbo 
frames. However, where TCP chimney is 
supported by the NIC, VMQ takes precedence. 
 
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 3 of 10
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
create fill in pdf forms; create fill pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Table 6) LUN types for use with Data ONTAP 7.2.5 through 7.3.0. 
BP #3: Virtual Machine Disk Alignment
Tip: This tip is closely tied to the previous one, since failure to follow the previous tip will result in 
misalignment. The problem of virtual machine disk alignment is not unique to Hyper­V, nor is it 
unique to NetApp storage. This problem exists in any virtual environment on any storage platform.
This problem occurs because, by default, many guest operating systems, including Windows 2000 
and 2003 and various Linux® distributions, start the first primary partition at sector (logical block) 63. 
This behavior leads to misaligned file systems because the partition does not begin at a block 
boundary. As a result, every time the virtual machine wants to read a block, two blocks have to be read 
from the underlying LUN, doubling the I/O burden.
Figure 1) Virtual disk misalignment. 
The situation becomes even more complicated when virtual machines are managed as files within 
the Hyper­V server’s file system, because it introduces another layer that must be properly aligned. 
This is why selecting the LUN type is so critical.
l
NetApp strongly recommends correcting the offset for all VM templates, as well as any existing 
VMs that are misaligned and are experiencing an I/O performance issue. (Misaligned VMs with 
low I/O requirements may not benefit from the effort to correct the misalignment.) 
l
When using virtual hard disks (VHDs), NetApp recommends using fixed­size VHDs in your 
Microsoft Hyper­V virtual environment wherever possible, especially in production 
environments, because proper file system alignment can be reliably achieved only on fixed­
size VHDs. Avoid the use of dynamically expanding and differencing VHDs where possible, 
because file system alignment can never be reliably achieved with these VHD types. 
The best practices guide provides complete procedures for identifying and correcting alignment 
problems.
BP #4: Using Cluster Shared Volumes
Cluster shared volumes are a completely new feature in Hyper­V R2. If you’re familiar with VMware®, 
you can think of a CSV as being somewhat akin to VMFS (although there are significant differences).
A CSV is a “disk” that is connected to the Hyper­V parent partition and shared between multiple Hyper­
V server nodes configured as part of a Windows failover cluster. A CSV can be created only from 
shared storage, such as a LUN provisioned on a NetApp storage system. All Hyper­V server nodes in 
the failover cluster must be connected to the shared storage system.
 
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 4 of 10
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert pdf to form fillable; pdf create fillable form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
add signature field to pdf; convert word form to pdf with fillable
CSVs have many advantages, including:
l
Shared namespace. CSVs do not need to be assigned a drive letter, reducing restrictions and 
eliminating the need to manage GUIDs and mount points. 
l
Simplified storage management. More VMs share fewer LUNs. 
l
Storage efficiency. Pooling VMs on the same LUN simplifies capacity planning and reduces 
the amount of space reserved for future growth, because it is no longer set aside on a per­VM 
basis. 
CSV Dynamic I/O Redirection allows storage and network I/O to be redirected within a failover cluster 
if a primary pathway is interrupted. The following recommendations apply specifically to the use of 
CSVs and are intended to minimize the impact of I/O redirection:
l
In addition to the NICs installed in the Hyper­V server for management, VMs, IP storage, and 
more (see Best Practice #1), NetApp recommends that you dedicate a physical network 
adapter to CSV traffic only. The physical network adapter should be a gigabit Ethernet (GbE) 
adapter at a minimum. If you are running large servers (16 LCPUs+, 64GB+), planning to use 
CSVs extensively, planning to dynamically balance VMs across the cluster by using SCVMM, 
and/or planning to use live migration extensively; you should consider 10 Gigabit Ethernet for 
CSV traffic. 
l
NetApp strongly recommends that you configure MPIO on all Hyper­V cluster nodes, to 
minimize the opportunity for CSV I/O redirection to occur. CSV I/O Redirection is not a 
substitute for multipathing or for proper planning of storage layout and networking, which will 
minimize single points of failure in production environments. 
l
Once you recognize that I/O redirection is occurring on a CSV, you may want to live migrate all 
affected VMs on the affected cluster node to another Hyper­V cluster node to restore optimal 
performance until any I/O pathway problems are diagnosed and repaired. 
The best practices guide describes additional best practices that pertain specifically to backup and 
VM provisioning with CSVs.
BP #5: NetApp Storage Software and Tools
NetApp provides a variety of storage software and tools that can simplify operations in a Hyper­V 
environment. With the release of Hyper­V R2, minimum requirements have changed for many 
software elements:
l
As a minimum, NetApp recommends using Data ONTAP 7.3 or later with Hyper­V virtual 
environments. 
l
The Windows Host Utilities Kit modifies system settings so that the Hyper­V parent or child OS 
operates with the highest reliability possible when connected to NetApp storage. NetApp 
strongly recommends that the Windows Host Utilities Kit be installed on all Hyper­V servers. 
Windows Server 2008 requires Windows Host Utilities Kit 5.1 or later. Windows Server 2008 
R2 (Hyper­V R2) requires Windows Host Utilities Kit 5.2 or later. 
l
Highly available storage configurations require the appropriate version of the Data ONTAP 
DSM for Windows MPIO. Windows Server 2008 requires Data ONTAP DSM 3.2R1 or later. 
Windows Server 2008 R2 requires Data ONTAP DSM 3.3.1 or later. You should set the least 
queue depth policy when using MPIO. (This is the default setting.) 
l
NetApp recommends NetApp SnapDrive on all Hyper­V and SCVMM servers to enable 
maximum functionality and support of key features. For Microsoft Windows Server 2008 
installations where the Hyper­V role is enabled and for Microsoft Hyper­V Server 2008, install 
NetApp SnapDrive for Windows 6.0 or later. For Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 
installations where the Hyper­V role is enabled and for Microsoft Hyper­V Server 2008 R2 to 
support: 
¡
Existing features (no new R2 features), install NetApp SnapDrive for Windows 6.1P2 
or later. 
¡
New features (all new R2 features), install NetApp SnapDrive for Windows 6.2 or later. 
l
NetApp SnapDrive for Windows 6.0 or later can also be installed in supported child operating 
systems that include Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Windows Server 2008, and 
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2. 
For the latest information on supported software versions, refer to the NetApp Interoperability Matrix
(You must have a NOW™ (NetApp on the Web) account to access this resource.)
Conclusion
If you pay attention to the best practices I’ve outlined here, you can avoid most of the pitfalls of 
configuring your Hyper­V environment. For complete details on these procedures and much more, 
refer to the Hyper­V best practices guide and Hyper­V implementation guide
 Got opinions about Hyper­V? 
 
Ask questions, exchange ideas, and share your thoughts online in NetApp Communities.
Chaffie McKenna 
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 5 of 10
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert html form to pdf fillable form; convert word document to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with embedded Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; pdf fillable form
 
Chaffie McKenna 
Reference Architect
NetApp
Chaffie joined NetApp in early 2008 as part of NetApp’s Microsoft Alliance 
Engineering team based in Seattle, WA. She focuses heavily on virtualization, 
especially Microsoft Hyper­V and SCVMM. Her experience with virtualization 
goes back 10 years, when virtualization was in its infancy.
 
Privacy Policy    
Contact Us    
Careers    
RSS & Subscriptions
   
How to Buy     Feedback  
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 6 of 10
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
change font size pdf fillable form; c# fill out pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; converting a word document to pdf fillable form
 
 
 
Take Disk Storage to the Next Level with SAS 
By Doug Coatney and Chris Lueth, NetApp
Over the next several years, the serial­attached SCSI (SAS) interconnect is expected to replace Fibre 
Channel (FC) as the high­performance, primary storage drive interconnect of choice in enterprise 
storage systems.
NetApp started shipping SAS drives as an option in the FAS2000 family a few years ago and recently 
announced its first SAS­based storage enclosure: the DS4243. This new disk shelf offers the density, 
flexibility, and reliability necessary for the enterprise with frame array class resiliency.
Tech OnTap asked Chris Lueth of Technical Marketing to sit down with Doug Coatney of the Core 
Systems’ Storage Engineering team to find out more. We’ve broken their Q&A session into three 
broad topics:
l
SAS technology versus Fibre Channel 
l
New disk shelf technology 
l
Out­of­band management capabilities 
SAS Technology
Chris Lueth: Why is NetApp transitioning storage infrastructures from FC to SAS? 
Doug Coatney: As most Tech OnTap readers are probably aware, the storage industry is already 
transitioning from Fibre Channel to SAS storage to fill high­performance storage needs. In 2008, 
almost twice as many SAS disks shipped as FC disks. By 2013, SAS shipments are forecast to be 
almost 60% of the HDD market, while FC shipments are expected to be concluded altogether. 
Figure 1) Actual HDD shipments (2008) and forecast shipments (2013). SAS essentially cannibalizes 
the market for both Fibre Channel and parallel SCSI disk, while ATA remains relatively stable.
Chris: Does SAS offer technology advantages that are driving this transition?
Doug: Yes, there are three major factors that favor SAS:
l
Point­to­point isolation 
l
Increased bandwidth 
l
Greatly improved connectivity 
These capabilities offer significant advantages for anyone deploying SAS.
Keep on Top of NetApp Technology
Want to keep up with what’s happening with SAS 
and other new technologies at NetApp? 
Read the NetApp Insights blog for the latest from 
NetApp product marketing on SAS, FCoE, Flash, 
virtualization, and more. 
  More 
The Private Lives of Disk Drives
NetApp builds resiliency into its storage systems 
at every level so that critical data is always 
protected.
This classic Tech OnTap article explains how 
NetApp protects you from five common drive 
failure modes. 
  More  
What’s in a Name?  
NetApp DS4243 
NetApp has modified the way we name our disk 
shelves. Given our strategic direction and the 
technology used in our disk shelves, this 
approach is the most intuitive.
l
DS
xxxx – Disk shelf  
l
DS4
xxx – 4U  
l
DSx24
x – 24 drive bays  
l
DSxxx3
 – 3Gbp/s SAS backbone  
 
Quick Links
netapp.com
Tech OnTap Archive
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 7 of 10
Figure 2) FC versus SAS topology.
Point­to­point. SAS uses a point­to point approach with nonblocking switches (expanders) similar to 
an Ethernet switch. These expanders provide complete isolation for each attached device, thereby 
avoiding many of the problems that can affect resiliency in loop­based topologies like Fibre Channel­
Arbitrated Loop (FC­AL, the protocol used to connect to FC disks). SAS expanders provide path 
switching, arbitration and central management, and they also serve as traffic cops to make sure that 
all devices share bandwidth fairly.
Bandwidth. Current FC disk bandwidth is 4Gb/s per port. We have quad port PCIe adapters, so the 
aggregate FC­AL bandwidth per PCIe slot is 16Gb/s. 
The NetApp® DS4243 product supports 3Gb/s SAS links. Looking at the same PCIe slot, a SAS quad 
adapter has four ports with 12Gb/s aggregate bandwidth each, for a total of 48Gb/s.  
A storage­controller­to­disk­subsystem connection is made through a SAS “wide port.” The standard 
wide port is a set of four SAS lanes working together to provide maximum throughput. With SAS 
bandwidth of 3Gb/s, grouping four ports together yields a maximum bandwidth of 12Gb/s. This 
provides a wide pipe for storage systems to move data to and from disk subsystems. These lanes 
provide greater bandwidth from storage controllers to disk enclosures, plus bandwidth balancing, 
path redundancy, and improved error recovery, making it possible to safely scale a SAS connection to 
large numbers of disk drives.
Connectivity. With FC­AL, the theoretical maximum number of drives supported on a loop is 126. 
For SAS, the number of drives that can be connected to a single SAS port is limited primarily by 
performance considerations. In a SAS domain, the use of expanders yields up to 16,384 uniquely 
addressed devices. A “fan­out” expander can connect to 128 edge expanders, each capable of 
connecting to 128 disk drives: 128 x 128 = 16,384. (These are theoretical maximums. See the 
following section for numbers of drives supported with the DS4243.)
Chris: What’s the difference between an FC disk and a SAS disk? 
Doug: The main difference between a SAS disk and an equivalent FC disk is in the interface 
electronics. SAS disk drives do not introduce new technology risks because they are mechanically 
equivalent to existing FC disk drives, use the same SCSI command set, and have the same 
performance and reliability characteristics. SAS disk drives simply use a different serial 
communication protocol.
The NetApp DS4243 Disk Shelf
Figure 3) Front and rear views of the DS4243.
Chris: Can you give our readers an overview of the features of the new NetApp disk shelf? 
Doug: The key thing that users should understand about the NetApp DS4243 disk drive expansion 
shelf is that it was designed by NetApp and optimized for use with NetApp storage systems. The new 
shelf uses 3Gb/s SAS; SAS wide ports (four lanes of 3Gb/s each) are used to connect the storage 
 
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 8 of 10
shelf uses 3Gb/s SAS; SAS wide ports (four lanes of 3Gb/s each) are used to connect the storage 
controller to the shelf. Up to 24 disk drives (all SAS or all SATA) are supported in a 4U­high rack­
mount chassis, improving density by 22% over the previous generation disk subsystem. The shelf 
uses SAS technology (between the disk shelf and controller as well as within the shelf) and features 
new out­of­band management functionality, called alternate control path (ACP—more about this in the 
final section). 
Power for the shelf is fully redundant: four power supplies are required for a disk shelf populated with 
SAS drives, two supplies are required for a disk shelf with SATA. The shelf also contains four 1U bays 
for electronics modules. Two are occupied by SAS I/O modules (IOM3). The remaining two bays are 
not currently used.
The mechanical and electrical design is based on the industry­standard Storage Bridge Bay (SBB) 
specification. SBB offers flexibility and standardization of enclosure interfaces that can help you 
streamline technology transitions. For example, current DS4243 components can be reused  in future 
SAS­based storage technology. 
Chris: What is a SAS “stack”? 
Doug: NetApp uses the term “stack” to refer to a collection of correctly wired and interconnected SAS 
shelves and adapters. Up to 10 shelves are supported per stack for a total of 240 drives, except in the 
FAS2040 and FAS2050, which support only 4 shelves per stack. SAS and SATA drives can be mixed 
in the same stack but not in the same shelf. 
Chris: How are SATA disk drives accommodated in the new shelf?
Doug:  Another potential advantage of SAS over FC is that SAS provides native support for SATA drives 
through serial tunneling. Any SAS disk subsystem can easily support both SAS and SATA. However, 
serial tunneling does not support multiple paths to SATA disks, making high­availability (HA) 
configurations impossible. 
To get around this limitation, the SATA drive carriers used in the DS4243 shelves contain a SATA­to­
SAS bridge. This means that the native SAS protocol (with multipath capability) is used between the 
storage controller and every disk, regardless of type.
Chris: What do I need to take advantage of the new disk shelf?
Doug: All you need is a NetApp storage system with an available PCI Express (PCIe) slot, a SAS 
adapter, the correct version of Data ONTAP®, and the disk shelf hardware and cabling.
The DS4243 is supported on all currently shipping NetApp FAS, V­Series, and SA storage systems 
except the FAS 2020. If you want to install the new shelf on an existing storage system, you’ll need at 
least one available PCIe slot (to accommodate a SAS HBA), or you can use the embedded SAS port 
on a FAS2040. You’ll also need Data ONTAP 7.3.2 or later. Your existing disk drives from the DS14 
family of products and the FAS2000 line cannot be used in the DS4243 because the drive carrier 
configuration is different.
Chris: Are enhanced resiliency features built into the new disk shelf?
Doug: The DS4243 is designed to provide greater resiliency, fault isolation, and recovery than any 
previous NetApp disk subsystem. In addition to the SAS capabilities already mentioned, it features 
redundant components and busses, nonvolatile event logs, and nondisruptive firmware updates.  
All supported configurations provide either dual­path connections or multipath HA (MPHA) except for 
the FAS2040, which has limited SAS ports. In addition, the DS4243 features out­of­band 
management capabilities that provide frame array class resiliency, the first of its kind in a modular 
storage enclosure. The features complement the in­band resiliency capabilities of the SAS protocol. 
(See the following section for details.)
Out­of­Band Management with ACP
Chris: Can you talk more about the out­of­band management capabilities that NetApp added to the 
DS4243?
Doug: For out­of­band management on the DS4243, NetApp has created its Alternate Control Path 
(ACP) technology. ACP gives you a back door into your disk shelves. It is completely separate from the 
SAS data path and provides new options for nondisruptive recovery of shelf modules, including the 
ability to reset or power cycle an individual I/O module (IOM) or an entire domain (that is, all IOMs on 
the A domain). We designed in the ability to power cycle the entire shelf as well. Each IOM contains an 
ACP and each shelf contains two IOMs. The new ACP technology enhances the ability of Data ONTAP 
to automatically reset a misbehaving component in order to return it to a fully operational mode 
without disruption. 
Although NetApp highly recommends it, ACP is not required. Because ACP is completely separate 
from the data path, the data path continues to function when ACP is not connected or not operational.
Chris: What type of network does ACP use?
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 9 of 10
Doug: ACP uses a dedicated Ethernet network. Storage shelves are connected by using a daisy­chain 
topology with a flyback connection for added resilience. IP addresses are automatically assigned by 
Data ONTAP. (The default ranges can be changed.) 
Chris: What are the advantages of configuring ACP?
Doug: ACP enhances data availability by giving a storage controller the ability to reset a storage 
channel without having to communicate over that channel. If a channel is down or misbehaving, a 
quick reset can bring it back online without external intervention. ACP allows a storage system to 
recover from faults that might otherwise require it to reboot, and that’s a big advantage. Other vendors 
provide this level of capability only in their highest end tier 1 storage, while NetApp enables this 
feature regardless of the storage platform or tier.
Conclusion
With the release of the DS4243 disk shelf, NetApp has taken another step toward simplifying your 
storage environment. With the DS4243, you need only one type of disk shelf to accommodate all tiers 
of storage. You can choose performance­optimized SAS disks or capacity­optimized SATA (or both), 
and the industry­standard Storage Bridge Bay–based architecture provides flexibility for future 
expansion.
 Got opinions about SAS or SAS storage subsystems? 
 
Ask questions, exchange ideas, and share your thoughts online in NetApp Communities.
 
Doug Coatney 
Principal Storage Software Engineer
NetApp
Doug has 23 years of experience in the storage industry, the last 10 of which 
have been at NetApp. He has played key roles in the development of every disk 
subsystem NetApp has released during that time. NetApp holds over a dozen 
patents based on Doug’s work.  
Chris Lueth 
Technical Marketing Engineer
NetApp
Chris has over 17 years of industry experience. Since joining NetApp more than 
6 years ago, he has gained incredible technical breadth, including work on 
NearStore® deployments, RAID­DP®, SnapLock®, entry, midrange, and high­
end platforms, and storage resiliency. He was previously a chip design 
engineer and worked on the first multiprocessor motherboard chipset before 
switching to UNIX® system administration and then to storage.
 
Privacy Policy    
Contact Us    
Careers    
RSS & Subscriptions
   
How to Buy     Feedback  
Tech OnTap November 2009 | Page 10 of 10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested