Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
Binary calculations for the number of tones represented by common bit 
depths:
1 bit (2
1)
= 2 tones
2 bits (2
2
) = 4 tones
3 bits (2
3)
= 8 tones
4 bits (2
4)
= 16 tones
8 bits (2
8
) = 256 tones
16 bits (2
16)
= 65,536 tones
24 bits (2
24)
= 16.7 million tones
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-04.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:23 PM]
Change font size pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
asp.net fill pdf form; convert pdf fill form
Change font size pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf with fields to fill in; create pdf fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
1. Basic Terminology
Key Concepts 
digital images
resolution
pixel dimensions
bit depth
dynamic range
file size
compression
file formats
additional reading 
D
YNAMIC
R
ANGE
is the range of tonal difference between the lightest light and 
darkest dark of an image. The higher the dynamic range, the more potential 
shades can be represented, although the dynamic range does not 
automatically correlate to the number of tones reproduced. For instance, high-
contrast microfilm exhibits a broad dynamic range, but renders few tones. 
Dynamic range also describes a digital system's ability to reproduce tonal 
information. This capability is most important for continuous-tone documents 
that exhibit smoothly varying tones, and for photographs it may be the single 
most important aspect of image quality.
Dynamic Range: The image on top has a broader dynamic range, but a 
limited number of tones represented. The lower image has a narrower 
dynamic range, but a greater number of tones represented. Note the lack of 
detail in shadows and highlights in the top frame. Courtesy of Don Brown. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-05.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:24 PM]
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
add attachment to pdf form; attach file to pdf form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
add fillable fields to pdf; convert word form to pdf fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
Reality Check
Which of the these images has the more limited tonal 
representation? 
Answer (check one):
The image on the left
The image on the right
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-05.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:24 PM]
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
pdf form fill; converting a word document to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
create fill pdf form; change font pdf fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
1. Basic Terminology
Key Concepts 
digital images
resolution
pixel dimensions
bit depth
dynamic range
file size
compression
file formats
additional reading 
F
ILE
S
IZE
is calculated by multiplying the surface area of a document (height x 
width) to be scanned by the bit depth and the dpi
2
. Because image file size is 
represented in bytes, which are made up of 8 bits, divide this figure by 8. 
Formula 1 for File Size
File Size = (height x width x bit depth x dpi
2
) / 8
If the pixel dimensions are given, multiply them by each other and the bit 
depth to determine the number of bits in an image file. For instance, if a 24-bit 
image is captured with a digital camera with pixel dimensions of 2,048 x 
3,072, then the file size equals (2048 x 3072 x 24)/8, or 18,874,368 bytes.
Formula 2 for File Size
File Size = (pixel dimensions x bit depth) / 8
File size naming convention: Because digital images often result in very large 
files, the number of bytes is usually represented in increments of 2
10
(1,024) 
or more:
1 Kilobyte (KB) = 1,024 bytes
1 Megabyte (MB) = 1,024 KB
1 Gigabyte (GB) = 1,024 MB
1 Terabyte (TB) = 1,024 GB
Reality Check 
What is the file size for a 
US letter-size page captured bitonally at 100 dpi? 
bytes     
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-06.html [4/28/2003 2:27:25 PM]
Check Answer
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
change pdf to fillable form; convert pdf to form fillable
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
convert excel to fillable pdf form; pdf create fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
1. Basic Terminology
Key Concepts 
digital images
resolution
pixel dimensions
bit depth
dynamic range
file size
compression
file formats
additional reading 
C
OMPRESSION
is used to reduce image file size for storage, processing, and 
transmission. The file size for digital images can be quite large, taxing the 
computing and networking capabilities of many systems. All compression 
techniques abbreviate the string of binary code in an uncompressed image to 
a form of mathematical shorthand, based on complex algorithms. There are 
standard and proprietary compression techniques available. In general it is 
better to utilize a standard and broadly supported one than a proprietary one 
that may offer more efficient compression and/or better quality, but which may 
not lend itself to long-term use or digital preservation strategies. There is 
considerable debate in the library and archival community over the use of 
compression in master image files. 
Compression schemes can be further characterized as either lossless or 
lossy. Lossless schemes, such as ITU-T.6, abbreviate the binary code without 
discarding any information, so that when the image is "decompressed" it is bit 
for bit identical to the original. Lossy schemes, such as JPEG, utilize a means 
for averaging or discarding the least significant information, based on an 
understanding of visual perception. However, it may be extremely difficult to 
detect the effects of lossy compression, and the image may be considered 
"visually lossless." Lossless compression is most often used with bitonal 
scanning of textual material. Lossy compression is typically used with tonal 
images, and in particular continuous tone images where merely abbreviating 
the information will not result in any appreciable file savings.
Lossy Compression: Note the effects of JPEG lossy compression on the 
zoomed image (left). In the bottom image, artifacts are visible in the form of
8 x 8 pixel squares, and fine details such as eyelashes have disappeared.
Emerging compression schemes offer the capability of providing multi-
resolution images from a single file, providing flexibility in the delivery and 
presentation of images to end users. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-07.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:26 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
To review a table summarizing important attributes for common 
compression techniques, 
click here.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-07.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:26 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
1. Basic Terminology
Key Concepts 
digital images
resolution
pixel dimensions
bit depth
dynamic range
file size
compression
file formats 
additional reading 
F
ILE
F
ORMATS
consist of both the bits that comprise the image and header 
information on how to read and interpret the file. File formats vary in terms of 
resolution, bit-depth, color capabilities, and support for compression and 
metadata. 
To review a table summarizing important attributes for eight common 
image formats in use today, 
click here
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-08.html [4/28/2003 2:27:27 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Basic Terminology
1. Basic  Terminology
Key Concepts 
digital images
resolution
pixel dimensions
bit depth
dynamic range
file size
compression
file formats 
additional reading 
A
DDITIONAL
R
EADING
Glossaries of Digital Imaging Terms: 
Glossaries, PADI: Preserving Access to Digital Information, 
http://www.nla.gov.au/padi/format/gloss.html
"Glossary" in Digital Toolbox (Colorado Digitization Project), 
http://coloradodigital.coalliance.org/glossary.html
Anne R. Kenney and Oya Y. Rieger, Moving Theory into Practice: Digital 
Imaging for Libraries and Archives, Mountain View, CA : Research Libraries 
Group, 2000. 
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html
Franziska Frey, File Formats for Digital Masters, Guide 5 to Quality in Visual 
Resource Imaging
http://www.rlg.org/visguides/visguide5.html
RLG DigiNews contains various features on file formats and compression 
techniques. Use the browse option to find articles, highlighted Web sites, and 
other information, 
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/browse.html.
Technical Advisory Service for Images, New Digital Image File Formats, 
http://www.tasi.ac.uk/advice/creating/newfile.html
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/intro/intro-09.html [4/28/2003 2:27:28 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Selection
2. Selection
Key Concepts
introduction
legal restrictions 
other criteria
selection policies
additional reading 
I
NTRODUCTION
Libraries and archives initiate imaging programs to meet real or perceived 
needs. The utility of digital images is most likely ensured when the needs of 
users are clearly defined, the attributes of the documents are known, and the 
technical infrastructure to support conversion, management, and delivery of 
content is appropriate to the needs of the project.
L
EGAL
R
ESTRICTIONS
Begin your selection process by considering legal restrictions. Is the material 
restricted because of privacy, content, or donor concerns? Is it copyright 
protected? If so, do you have the right to create and disseminate digital 
reproductions? Laura N. Gasaway, Professor of Law and Director of the Law 
Library at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, maintains an updated 
chart summarizing the terms of protection for published and unpublished 
works. Peter Hirtle of the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections has 
developed a 
chart specifically geared to archival and manuscript curators. 
Additional information on copyright in the digital world is available from the 
Copyright Management Center at Indiana University-Purdue University 
Indianapolis, and from the 
Copyright Crash Course at the University of Texas. 
For copyright laws pertaining to the UK, TASI provides the "
Copyright FAQ
co-developed with the Arts and Humanities Data Service.
The Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) offers several 
publications via subscription or sale on 
managing intellectual property
Note: we'd like to include good sources on copyright for other countries; if you 
know of any, please 
drop us a line. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/selection/selection-01.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:29 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Selection
Reality Check
My institution is interested in digitizing and making network 
accessible brittle books published in the United States from 1880-
1920. Do we have the legal right to do so? Answer (check one):
Yes   No   
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/selection/selection-01.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:27:29 PM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested