c# ghostscript pdf to image : Allow users to attach to pdf form Library application class asp.net windows wpf ajax tutorial_English10-part1084

Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
S
CALING
R
OUTINES AND
P
ROGRAMS
Institutions have constrained file size by reducing resolution, bit depth, and/or 
by applying compression. The goal is to speed delivery to the desktop without 
compromising too much image quality. Scaling refers to the process of 
creating access versions from a digital master without having to rescan the 
source document. The program and scripts used for scaling will affect the 
quality of the presentation. For instance, scaling can introduce moiré in 
illustrations, such as halftones, when resolution is reduced without attention 
paid to screen interference. 
Effects of Scaling on Image Quality: The left image is scaled by using a 
blur filter, resizing, and reducing the bit depth. The right image is scaled 
without the use of blur filter, resulting in moiré.
Scaling programs are also used to reduce the bit-depth of an image and 
different processes result in substantially different quality. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-05.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:22 PM]
Allow users to attach to pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create a pdf form to fill out and save; create a writable pdf form
Allow users to attach to pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create fillable forms in pdf; create fillable form pdf online
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Effects of Scaling Programs: Note the image quality difference between 
these two derivatives created by different conversion software. 
Several Web sites listed at the end of this section provide helpful information 
on scaling programs, optimizing graphics, and choosing file formats to 
enhance image quality. Consider also whether the program offers batch 
processing and user-defined scripting capabilities, and get a sense of the total 
processing times. Minutes spent on one image quickly add up to days, weeks, 
and months, depending on the size of your image collection.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-05.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:22 PM]
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Rectangle Annotation Imaging Control
VB.NET solution is designed to help users create a Able to attach a user-defined shadow to created Allow VB.NET developers to add rectangle annotation to Word
c# fill out pdf form; create a fillable pdf form
VB.NET Image: Image Drawing SDK, Draw Text & Graphics on Image
Allow VB.NET developers to write text on source and graphics drawing function, we attach links to powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
auto fill pdf form from excel; convert pdf fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
M
ONITOR
C
APABILITIES
User satisfaction with on-screen images will depend on the capabilities of 
display systems. In addition to speed of delivery, users are interested in 
image quality (legibility and color fidelity adequate to a task); full display of 
images on screen; and to a lesser degree accurate representations of the 
dimensions of original documents. Unfortunately, given current monitor 
technology, meeting all these criteria at the same time is often not possible.
Screen size and pixel dimensions
In contrast to scanners and printers, current monitors offer relatively low 
resolution. Typical monitors support desktop settings from a low of 640 x 480 
to a high of 1,600 x 1,200, referring to the number of horizontal by vertical 
pixels painted on the screen when an image appears. 
The amount of an image that can be displayed at once depends on the 
relationship of the image's 
pixel dimensions (or dpi) to the 
monitor's desktop 
setting. The percentage of an image displayed can be increased several 
ways: by increasing  the screen resolution and/or by decreasing the image 
resolution. 
Increasing screen resolution. Think of the desktop setting as a camera 
viewfinder. As the monitor setting dimensions increase, more of an image 
may be viewed. The figure below illustrates the viewing area for an image at 
various monitor settings. 
Increasing Screen Resolution: Viewing area comparison for a 100 dpi 
(original document size 8"x10") image displayed at different monitor settings. 
The pixel dimension for the image is 800 x 1,000.
Decreasing image resolution. One can also increase the amount of an image 
displayed by reducing the resolution of the image through scaling. This figure 
illustrates the relationship of a monitor's desktop setting at 800 x 600 to an 
image scaled to various resolutions.
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-06.html (1 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:23 PM]
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Code to Scan Document into TIFF Image File
document is scanned by a physical scanner device, users need to TIFF file in VB.NET image application; Allow VB.NET Here we attach a link which can lead you to
convert pdf form fillable; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Balancing Legibility and Completeness: Displayed at 200 dpi on a 800 x 
600 monitor, one can only see a small portion of the page (left). At 60 dpi, the 
whole page is fully displayed, but at the expense of legibility (bottom-right). 
Scaling the image to 100 dpi offers a compromise by maintaining legibility and 
limiting scrolling to one dimension (top-right).
You can calculate the percent of display if you know the following variables: 
1) document dimensions and image dpi, or pixel dimensions of image, and 2) 
desktop setting.
Calculating percentage displayed
Enter document dimensions in inches: 
(width) and 
(height) and enter resolution of image: 
dpi 
OR
Enter image pixel dimensions 
horizontal 
vertical
Screen size % displayed % width displayed % height displayed
640 x 480
800 x 600
1024 x 768
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-06.html (2 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:23 PM]
Calculate!
Reset
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Dimensional Fidelity
At times, it may be important to represent an image on-screen at the actual 
size of the original scanned document. This can only be achieved when the 
digital image resolution equals the monitor's resolution (dpi). The Blake 
Archive Project has developed a Java applet, called the 
Image Sizer, for 
representing images at the actual size of the original. 
Reality Check 
If representation of dimensional fidelity on-screen is important, 
what is the likely impact on image quality? 
Image quality will not be affected, only the size of the 
image 
Image quality will often increase, as the document will be 
presented at its native size with details fully presented 
Image quality will often decline as the screen resolution is 
typically lower than the digital image resolution 
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-06.html (3 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:23 PM]
Check Answer
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
O
N-SCREEN
I
MAGE
Q
UALITY
We have noted the effects of various scaling programs and routines on image 
quality. Two other factors should be considered as well:
1.  
Is the resolution of the image sufficient to ensure legibility or support 
detailed study of an image? 
2.  
Can color and tone be conveyed effectively?
Legibility of Text
As we have seen, legibility and completeness often conflict. For instance, 
when an 8 x 10-inch text-page scanned at 200 dpi is scaled to fit on a monitor 
set to 800 x 600, over 90% of the pixels have been discarded. The image fits, 
but the text may no longer be readable. 
Cornell has developed a benchmarking formula for the display of text-based 
materials that correlates image quality, resolution, and the required level of 
detail:
Benchmarking On-Screen Legibility Formula 
dpi = QI/(.03h)
QI = dpi x .03h
h = QI/(.03dpi)
In the formula, dpi refers to the resolution of an image (not to be confused 
with the monitor's dpi); h refers to the height of the smallest character in the 
original (in mm); and QI refers to levels of legibility (Note: if h is measured in 
inches, multiply by 25.4 before using formula). This formula presumes that 
bitonal images are presented with 3 bits or more of gray and that filters and 
optimized scaling routines improve image presentation. Using this formula, 
establish your own levels of acceptable quality. Cornell benchmarks 
readability at a QI of 3.6, although 3.0 often suffices for cleanly produced text, 
particularly if it has been scanned in grayscale or color.
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-07.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:24 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Reality Check 
A 4 x 5-inch text page contains characters as small as 1mm in height 
and has been scanned at 600 dpi-1bit. At what resolution can you 
scale this image for on-screen presentation and still maintain 
character legibility (at a QI of 3.6)? 
dpi    
At that resolution, what percentage of your document could be 
displayed on a monitor set to 800 x 600?
    
Color and Tone 
Presenting 
color and tone depends on monitor and system capabilities. Color 
appearance is most problematic since it is affected by different browsers, 
monitor settings, and transfer between color spaces.
Several Web sites provide useful information on Web palettes for access (see 
additional reading). Some recommend using file formats such as PNG, which 
supports both a Web-safe palette and sRGB, designed to ensure color 
consistency across platforms. Others are including grayscale/color targets 
with the images to enable the end user to adjust the color. Still others, 
including the 
National Archives and the 
Denver Public Library, have 
developed monitor adjustment targets to help users calibrate their monitors. 
Monitor Adjustment: This portion of the
NARA Monitor Adjustment Target 
illustrates the full range of tones that a computer monitor can represent when 
set to 256 or more colors (8 bits or higher). The shades should be just 
distinguishable from one another. Courtesy of the National Archives and 
Records Administration.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-07.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:24 PM]
Check Answer
Check Answer
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
G
UIDELINES
To see what some institutions recommend for display, click on: 
Table: Representative Institutional Requirements for Access
A
DDITIONAL
R
EADING
Anne R. Kenney, "Digital Benchmarking for Preservation and Access," in 
Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives
Mountain View, CA : Research Libraries Group, 2000; pp. 24-60 
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html
John Price-Wilkin, "Enhancing Access to Digital Image Collections: System 
Building and Image Processing," in Moving Theory into Practice: Digital 
Imaging for Libraries and Archives, Mountain View, CA: Research Libraries 
Group, 2000; pp. 
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/mtip2000.html
Color and Tone 
Lynda Weinman, "The Browser Safe Color Palette," 
http://www.lynda.com/hex.html and 
http://the-light.com/netcol.html. Both of 
these have links to other useful sites on browser palettes and other Web 
graphics information.
Digital Images in Multimedia Presentation, "Image Manipulation and 
Preparation," 
http://www.tasi.ac.uk/advice/using/dimpmanipulation.html
The Bandwidth Conservation Society, 
http://www.tbcr.org/
Scaling Routines and Programs
Patrick J. Lynch and Sarah Horton, "Web Style Guide," 
http://info.med.yale.edu/caim/manual/contents.html
Wotsit's Graphic File Formats 
http://www.wotsit.org/search.asp?s=graphics
Anne R. Kenney and Louis H. Sharpe II, Illustrated Book Study: Digital 
Conversion Requirements of Printed Illustrations, 1999, 
http://lcweb.loc.gov/preserv/rt/illbk/ibs.htm
TASI, "DIMP WWW - Image Incorporation Case Study," 
http://www.tasi.ac.uk/advice/using/web_case.html
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-08.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:25 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Digital Preservation
8. Digital Preservation
Key Concepts 
definition
challenges
technical strategies 
organizational
strategies 
additional reading 
D
EFINITION
The goal of digital preservation is to maintain the ability to display, retrieve, 
and use digital collections in the face of rapidly changing technological and 
organizational infrastructures and elements. Issues to be addressed in digital 
preservation include: 
l
Retaining the physical reliability of the image files, accompanying 
metadata, scripts, and programs (e.g., make sure that the storage 
medium is reliable with back-ups, maintain the necessary hardware 
and software infrastructure to store and provide access to the 
collection)
l
Ensuring continued usability of the digital image collection (e.g., 
maintain an up-to-date user interface, enable users to retrieve and 
manipulate information to meet their information needs)
l
Maintaining collection security (e.g., implement strategies to control 
unauthorized alteration to the collection, develop and maintain a rights 
management program for fee-based services)
Although this section is one of the last of the tutorial, issues associated with 
longevity need to be discussed at the onset of any imaging initiative. Many of 
the issues that become impediments to long-term preservation are rooted in 
early decisions centering on selection and conversion. Digital preservation 
decisions and strategies should be developed as an integral part of a digital 
imaging initiative as many decisions will be closely coupled with an 
institution's long-term retention plans.  
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/preservation/preservation-01.html [4/28/2003 2:28:26 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Digital Preservation
8. Digital Preservation
Key Concepts 
definition
challenges
technical strategies 
organizational
strategies 
additional reading 
W
HY
I
S
D
IGITAL
P
RESERVATION
S
O
C
HALLENGING
?
Challenges are multi-faceted and can be grouped into two categories:
Technical Vulnerabilities 
l
Storage media, due to physical deterioration, mishandling, improper 
storage, and obsolescence. 
l
File formats and compression schemes, due to obsolescence or over-
reliance on proprietary and unsupported file and compression formats.
l
Integrity of the files, including safeguarding the content, context, fixity, 
references, and provenance.
l
Storage and processing devices, programs, operating systems, 
access interfaces, and protocols that change as technology evolves 
(often with limited backward compatibility).
l
Distributed retrieval and processing tools, such as embedded Java 
scripts and applets.
Organizational and Administrative Challenges 
l
Insufficient institutional commitment to long-term preservation
l
Lack of preservation policies and procedures
l
Scarcity of human and financial resources 
l
Varying (and asynchronous) stakeholder interests in the creation, 
maintenance, and distribution of digital image collections
l
Gaps in institutional memory due to staff turnover
l
Inadequate record keeping and administrative metadata 
l
Evolving nature of copyright and fair-use regulations that apply to 
digital collections  
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/preservation/preservation-02.html [4/28/2003 2:28:27 PM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested