c# ghostscript pdf to image : Change font size in fillable pdf form control Library system azure asp.net winforms console tutorial_English6-part1091

Digital Imaging Tutorial - Digitization Chain
6A. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
DIGITIZATION CHAIN
Key Concepts 
introduction
components
system integration
T
HREE
M
AJOR
C
OMPONENTS
For the purposes of this tutorial, the digitization chain and the technical 
infrastructure that supports it is divided into three major components: creation, 
management, and delivery. 
Image creation deals with the initial capture or conversion of a document or 
object into digital form, typically with a scanner or digital camera. There may 
then be one or more file or image processing steps applied to the initial 
image, which may alter, add, or extract data. Broad classes of processing 
include image editing (scaling, compression, sharpening, etc.) and metadata 
creation. 
File management refers to the organization, storage, and maintenance of 
images and related metadata. 
Image delivery incorporates the process of getting images to the user and 
encompasses networks, display devices, and printers. Issues associated with 
creating derivative images are covered in 
Presentation
Computers and their network interconnections are integral components of the 
digitization chain. Each link in the chain involves one or more computers and 
their various components (RAM, CPU, internal bus, expansion cards, 
peripheral support, storage devices, and networking support). Depending on 
the specific computing demands of each component, configuration 
requirements will change. Therefore we will revisit computer needs each step 
of the way. 
As we review each step, consider whether you'll conduct it yourself or rely on 
a vendor. (See 
Management, for more information on the advantages and 
disadvantages of outsourcing). Those steps performed in-house require the 
most attention, though outsourcing doesn't reduce the need for a well thought 
out 
quality control program. However, in order to successfully evaluate and 
negotiate for contracted services, and to clearly communicate to vendors 
exactly what is expected, develop a baseline understanding of the concepts 
and procedures involved.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalA-02.html [4/28/2003 2:27:54 PM]
Change font size in fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf forms to fillable; pdf add signature field
Change font size in fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf form fill; convert word form to pdf with fillable
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Digitization Chain
6A. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
DIGITIZATION CHAIN
Key Concepts 
introduction
components
system integration
S
YSTEM
I
NTEGRATION
C
ONNECTING THE 
C
HAIN
Keep a few overarching policy recommendations and caveats in mind as we 
discuss the technical infrastructure: 
1) Consider using a systems integrator who can guarantee that all 
components interoperate without difficulty. If you decide to do all component 
selection yourself, keep the number of devices to a minimum. 
2) Choose products that adhere to standards and have wide market 
acceptance and strong vendor support.
3) Despite all your best efforts, some things will go wrong, so be prepared for 
headaches. Claims to the contrary, plug 'n play doesn't always work. Digital 
imaging components must sometimes be adapted for library/archives use in 
creative ways. 
4) Don't skimp—you'll pay more in the long run. If you're serious about 
making a commitment to digital imaging, buy quality and budget for upgrades 
and replacements at regular intervals. Waiting until you're stuck with obsolete, 
unsupported equipment or file formats can lead to time-wasting and 
expensive problems. 
5) Involve technical staff early and often in planning discussions. As much as 
we'd like to think of it as linear, the digitization chain is really a complex shape 
that folds back on itself in several places. Technical staff can help identify the 
weak links resulting from the interdependencies of various steps in the 
process.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalA-03.html [4/28/2003 2:27:55 PM]
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf; add fillable fields to pdf online
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
create a fillable pdf form in word; converting pdf to fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
6B. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
IMAGE 
CREATION
Key Concepts 
introduction
how scanners work
scanner types
image processing
I
NTRODUCTION
A dazzling array of devices that start the digitization chain now beckon the 
prospective digital imaging initiative. Note: We use the term scanner to refer 
to all image capture devices, including digital cameras.
Ask some key questions about any scanner you might consider. 
l
Is this scanner compatible with my documents? Can it handle the 
range of sizes, document types (single leaf, bound volume), media 
(reflective, transparent), and the condition of the originals? For 
additional details on matching a scanner to a particular set of 
document specifications, see Appendix A "Assessing Document 
Attributes and Scanning Requirements" of 
The RLG Worksheet for 
Estimating Digital Reformatting Costs and Don Williams, 
Selecting a 
Scanner.
l
Can this scanner produce the requisite quality to meet my needs? It is 
always possible to derive a lower quality image from a higher quality 
one, but no amount of digital magic can accurately restore detail that 
was never captured to begin with. Factors to consider include optical 
(as opposed to interpolated) resolution, bit depth, dynamic range, and 
signal-to-noise ratio.
l
Can this scanner support my production schedule and conversion 
budget? (Pay attention to throughput claims—often a major factor in 
scanner cost.) What are its document handling capabilities? Its duty 
cycle, MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure), and lifetime capacity? 
What kind of maintenance contracts are available (on-site, 24-hour 
replacement, depot service)? 
Scanner specifications can be difficult to interpret and often lack 
standardization, making meaningful comparisons impossible. The RLG/DLF 
guide, 
Selecting a Scanner examines scanner specifications related to image 
quality and can help the reader see past the marketing hype that is 
commonplace in the industry. 
As you read through the details of available scanners, keep in mind that most 
scanners were designed for large markets such as the business and graphic 
arts segments. Few were designed to accommodate the specific needs of 
libraries and archives. Your goal will be to find one that best fits your needs 
with the fewest compromises.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-01.html [4/28/2003 2:27:56 PM]
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
create fill in pdf forms; pdf signature field
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
.net fill pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
6B. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
IMAGE 
CREATION
Key Concepts 
introduction
how scanners work
scanner types
image processing
H
OW
S
CANNERS
W
ORK
Scanners operate by shining light at the object or document being digitized 
and directing the reflected light (usually through a series of mirrors and 
lenses) onto a photosensitive element. In most scanners, the sensing medium 
is an electronic, light-sensing integrated circuit known as a charged coupled 
device (CCD). Light-sensitive photosites arrayed along the CCD convert 
levels of brightness into electronic signals that are then processed into a 
digital image. 
CCD is by far the most common light-sensing technology used in modern 
scanners. Two other technologies, CIS (Contact Image Sensor), and PMT 
(photomultiplier tube) are found in the low and high ends of the scanner 
market, respectively. CIS is a newer technology that allows scanners to be 
smaller and lighter, but sacrifices dynamic range, depth-of-field, and 
resolution. PMT-based drum scanners produce very high-quality images, but 
have limited application in library and archives scanning for reasons we'll 
discuss shortly.
Another sensing technology, CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide 
Semiconductor), appears primarily in low-end, hand-held digital cameras 
where its low cost, low power consumption and easier component integration 
permits smaller, less expensive designs. Traditionally, high-end and 
professional digital cameras employ CCD sensors, despite their expense and 
the complexity of their design, because they exhibit much superior noise 
characteristics. Although some innovative designs that render low-noise 
CMOS-based images are emerging, CCD still dominates the high end of the 
market. Click 
here for more details on scanner operation. Further technical 
details on digital cameras can be found 
here 
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-02.html [4/28/2003 2:27:57 PM]
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page
convert fillable pdf to html form; convert word form to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET RasterEdge.Imaging. Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
best pdf form filler; create a pdf with fields to fill in
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
6B. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
IMAGE 
CREATION
Key Concepts 
introduction
how scanners work
scanner types
image processing
S
CANNER
T
YPES 
Flatbeds
Flatbed scanners are the best-known and largest selling scanner type, and 
with good reason. They're versatile, easy to operate, and widely available. 
Their popularity for Web publishing has opened up a huge market, pushing 
prices for entry level units below $100. At the other end, professional units for 
the color graphics market now rival drum scanners in quality. All use the 
same basic technology, in which a light sensor (generally a CCD) and a light 
source, both mounted on a moving arm, sweep past the stationary document 
on a glass platen. Automatic document handlers (ADH) are available on some 
models, and can increase throughput and lessen operator fatigue for sets of 
uniform documents in reasonably good condition. A specialized variant of the 
flatbed scanner is the overhead book scanner, in which the scanner's light 
source, sensor array and optics are moved to an overhead arm assembly 
under which a bound volume can be placed face up for scanning.
Flatbed Scanner
Overhead Scanner
Sheetfeed Scanners
Sheetfeed scanners use the same basic technology as flatbeds, but maximize 
throughput, usually at the expense of quality. Generally designed for high-
volume business environments, they typically scan in black and white or gray 
scale at relatively low resolutions. Documents are expected to be of uniform 
size and sturdy enough to endure fairly rough handling, although the transport 
mechanisms on some newer models reduces the stress. Using roller, belt, 
drum, or vacuum transport, the light sensor and light source remain stationary 
while the document is moved past. An important subclass of sheetfeed 
scanners are upright models specifically designed for oversize documents 
such as maps and architectural drawings. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-03.html (1 of 5) [4/28/2003 2:27:59 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
Sheetfeed Scanner
Drum Scanners 
Drum scanners produce the highest resolution, highest quality scans of any 
scanner type, but at a price. Besides their expense, drum scanners are slow, 
not suitable for brittle documents and require a high level of operator skill. 
Thus they are typically found in service bureaus that cater to the color pre-
press market. 
Drum Scanner
Microfilm Scanners 
Microfilm scanners are highly specialized devices for digitizing roll film, fiche, 
and aperture cards. Getting good, consistent quality from a microfilm scanner 
can be difficult because they can be operationally complex, film quality and 
condition may vary, and because they offer minimal enhancement capability. 
Only a few companies make microfilm scanners, and the lack of competition 
contributes to the high cost of these devices. Specifications for some 
microfilm scanners are available at 
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews5-3.html#faq.
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-03.html (2 of 5) [4/28/2003 2:27:59 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
Microfilm Scanner
Slide Scanners 
Slide scanners are used to digitize existing slide libraries as well as photo 
intermediates of 3-dimensional objects and documents that are not well-
suited for direct scanning, though more and more such objects will be 
captured directly by digital camera. The use of transparent media generally 
delivers an image with good dynamic range, but depending on the size of the 
original, the resolution may be insufficient for some needs. Throughput can be 
slow. 
Slide Scanners
Digital Cameras 
Digital cameras combine a scanner with camera optics to form a versatile tool 
that can produce superior quality images. Though slower and more difficult to 
use than flatbed scanners, digital cameras are adaptable to a wide array of 
documents and objects. Most fragile materials can be safely captured, though 
the need to provide external lighting means that light damage may be a 
concern. Digital camera technology continues to improve, helped along by the 
growing consumer market. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-03.html (3 of 5) [4/28/2003 2:27:59 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
Digital Camera
To compare attributes of various capture devices, click on 
Table: Comparison of Scanners
Computer Considerations 
A computer used as a scanning workstation must avoid becoming a 
bottleneck in the production process. Here are some characteristics to seek in 
a scanning workstation:
l
Adequate RAM—512 MB recommended. More if the machine will also 
be used for image processing.
l
A fast CPU—minimum 1.8 Ghz Pentium IV (or compatible) or 800 
Mhz G4. 
l
Fast, capacious mass storage—enough space for at least temporary 
needs (40-60 GB), even if files are ultimately moved to other storage 
devices. (Methods for estimating storage needs are covered in 
File 
Management). 
l
Peripheral bus—Most low- and mid-range scanners now come with 
USB ports, commonly available on both Wintel and Mac computers. 
First generation USB (v.1.0/1.1) is quite slow and not suitable for large-
scale production work. USB 2.0 is (theoretically) 40 times faster but is 
only just becoming widely available on Wintel machines in 2002, and 
scanners that support it are not yet common. Scanners offering 
Firewire connections (about the same speed as USB 2.0) are fairly 
widely available and Firewire is standard on Macintoshes, though it 
may have to be added to some Wintel machines. High-end scanners, 
including both high-speed monochrome and color scanners and low-
speed (but very high quality) color scanners tend to offer only SCSI 
connectivity. SCSI has fallen out of favor on desktop systems, but can 
be installed on most systems with the addition of a peripheral card.
l
High-bandwidth networking (10/100/1000 Base-T) to allow fast access 
to and transfer of scanned files. 
l
Platform/operating system—Most scanners offering USB connectivity 
work equally well on Wintel and Macintosh computers, though some 
manufacturers do not supply software drivers for Macs (third party 
products can sometimes solve this problem). Some scanners are 
platform specific, with high-end color graphics scanners more likely to 
support only Macintoshes, and high-speed production scanners more 
likely to support only Wintel machines. Be sure to check specifications 
to insure the scanner you want is compatible with your existing 
infrastructure.  
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-03.html (4 of 5) [4/28/2003 2:27:59 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
Reality Check 
Which scanner(s) can be used to image a 3-dimensional object? 
Flatbed 
Sheetfeed 
Drum 
Slide/Film 
Microfilm 
Digital Camera 
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-03.html (5 of 5) [4/28/2003 2:27:59 PM]
Check Answer
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Image Creation
6B. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
IMAGE 
CREATION
Key Concepts 
introduction
how scanners work
scanner types
image processing
F
ILE
/I
MAGE
P
ROCESSING
A variety of processing steps follow scanning. Such procedures may occur at 
any point in the digitization chain, from immediately after scanning to just prior 
to delivery to end-users. These may be customized modifications that affect 
only certain files, or mass, automated processing of all files (batch 
processing). They may be one-time operations or done repeatedly on an as-
needed basis.
Examples of file/image processing operations: 
l
Editing, touch-up, enhancement—this includes steps such as 
descreening, despeckling, deskewing, sharpening, use of custom 
filters, and bit-depth adjustment. In some cases, the scanning 
software performs these steps. In others, separate image-editing tools 
(e.g., Adobe Photoshop, Corel Photo-Paint, ImageMagick) are 
utilized.
l
Compression—sometimes carried out by dedicated scanner firmware 
or dedicated hardware in the computer. Compression can also be a 
software-only operation though dedicated hardware is faster and 
should be considered when creating very large files or very large 
numbers of files. 
l
File format conversion—the original scan may not be in a format 
suitable for all intended uses, thus requiring conversion. See 
Presentation
l
Scaling—it's likely that scans captured at high resolution will not be 
suitable for on-screen display. Scaling (that is, resolution reduction 
through bit disposal) is often necessary in order to create images for 
Web delivery. See 
Presentation
l
OCR (optical character recognition)—conversion of scanned text to 
machine-readable text that can be searched or indexed.
l
Metadata creation—addition of text that helps describe, track, 
organize, or maintain an image. 
Computer Considerations 
In some cases, image processing can be accommodated in the scanning 
workstation, especially if each image is checked as it's created. In the case of 
"on-the-fly" operations such as image scaling done just prior to delivery, 
image processing usually takes place on the image server. 
Other operations may call for a separate computer. Image editing, especially 
for uncompressed 24-bit color images, requires large amounts of RAM and 
video memory. To work most efficiently, image editors require RAM several 
times the uncompressed size of the file being edited. A large, high-resolution 
monitor is also needed. 
Image processing steps that may be carried out on every file (e.g. OCR, 
format conversion, deskewing) can be extremely CPU intensive. Batch 
processing requires a fast processor, lots of RAM, fast storage subsystems, 
and rapid and efficient routing of data within the system. These characteristics 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalB-04.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:00 PM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested