c# ghostscript pdf to image : Convert pdf to pdf form fillable software control project winforms azure .net UWP tutorial_English9-part1094

Digital Imaging Tutorial - Delivery
current generation of LCDs (called TFT or active matrix) can now outperform 
CRT monitors in many areas. For many routine uses not requiring pixel 
dimensions above 1024 x 768, the small price premium can be easily justified 
by other advantages.
However, the accurate display of digital images, especially continuous tone 
images with large pixel dimensions, remains one of the few areas where 
CRTs still offer superior performance. In deciding whether to deploy LCDs for 
the viewing of digital image collections, careful consideration should be given 
to whether image presentation will suffer from the loss of color fidelity and 
dynamic range, and whether that loss is of significance to users. Side-by-side 
comparisons may be the best way to judge. In addition, given that many end 
users are now purchasing LCDs for personal use, it is prudent to assess how 
your images will look to users employing them.
Whether a monitor is being used for image editing, quality control, or for end 
user delivery, the more complete the user controls provided, the greater the 
ability to optimize performance. Monitors used to come with only brightness 
and contrast controls. Modern monitors allow considerably more fine tuning. 
Check a monitor's specifications to determine if the settings critical to your 
intended use are user-controlled.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalD-07.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:12 PM]
Convert pdf to pdf form fillable - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create a writable pdf form; pdf fill form
Convert pdf to pdf form fillable - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create fillable pdf form from word; convert word form to fillable pdf form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Delivery
6D. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
DELIVERY
Key Concepts 
introduction
networks
concerns
speed
trends
monitors
evaluation
 image quality
printers
technologies
evaluation 
MONITORS: DETERMINANTS OF IMAGE QUALITY
l
Screen resolution
l
Screen size
l
Dot pitch
l
Refresh rate
l
Bit depth
l
Monitor performance
l
Video card performance 
Obviously, the best display device can't correct image problems resulting from 
the use of inadequate equipment or poor decision-making in the capture or 
processing steps. Limitations in the color handling of operating systems and 
image viewing software (particularly Web browsers) can also affect final 
image quality.
Assuming, however, that considerable effort has been invested in image 
capture, it makes sense to choose a display device that will show off your 
images to best effect. Not all displays are created equal. Amongst CRT 
monitors, for example, the shadow mask design excels for text, while the 
aperture grille design produces better images, though the thin horizontal lines 
near the top and bottom of the screen may be annoying.
LCDs can also vary substantially in quality. Look for displays that are 
uniformly bright, high-contrast and that are viewable across a wide angle 
without falloff of brightness or color distortion.
When purchasing monitors, 17" CRTs should now be considered the 
minimum for most viewing purposes, though 19" monitors have dropped so 
much in price that they should be preferred unless desk space is limited. 21" 
monitors supporting up to 1920 x 1440 pixels have also declined in price and 
might be considered, despite their size and weight, if image completeness 
and/or dimensional fidelity are critical concerns. On the production side of 
digital imaging, larger monitors reduce eyestrain for staff doing quality control 
work.
15" LCDs offer almost the same viewing area as 17" CRTs, and may serve 
well for images that can be displayed in full at 1024 x 768 pixel dimensions 
and do not have demanding color accuracy requirements.
Dot pitch refers to the distance between the phosphor dots that the CRT's 
electron beam excites to create an image. That distance determines the finest 
detail that the CRT can resolve. Better CRTs have dot pitch specifications in 
the .24-.25mm range.
Other aspects of image quality are determined by the video card that drives 
the monitor. Many monitor specifications reflect the assumption that a 
sufficiently capable video card is used. 
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalD-08.html (1 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:13 PM]
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Dim doc As PPTXDocument = New PPTXDocument(inputFilePath) ' Convert it to a PDF.
change pdf to fillable form; convert pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts
convert pdf forms to fillable; create fillable form from pdf
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Delivery
Most modern CRTs can support multiple resolutions, though one or two will 
be optimal, depending on the monitor's size. The "sweet spot" for 17" 
monitors is in the 800 x 600 to 1024 x 768 range. For 19" monitors, it's 1024 x 
768 to 1280 x 1024. Most monitors support higher resolutions, though the 
highest resolution usually sacrifices some image quality and often results in 
text that is too small to read comfortably. LCDs are much more limited in this 
area, producing a truly quality image at only one resolution.
Refresh rate refers to how frequently the entire image is updated. If the 
refresh rate is too low, the viewer detects a subtle flicker in the image. Flicker-
free images require a refresh rate of at least 75 Hz, though rates as high as 
85 Hz improve viewing on some monitors. Excessively high refresh rates can 
also compromise image quality. To check for flicker, use your peripheral 
vision to view an all white screen. Due to the way an image is created on an 
LCD, refresh rate isn't a factor in the viewability of still images.
Bit depth support determines the number of colors or grays a monitor can 
reproduce. Virtually all CRTs and video cards now support 24- or 32-bit 
display at the highest pixel dimensions. A few LCD monitors are still limited to 
18-bit display (rather than the typical 24-bit) and thus cannot produce as wide 
a range of colors.
Computer considerations 
Beyond what's already been discussed, other aspects of the computer related 
to display center around additional hardware enhancements. Specialty 
hardware can provide accelerated compression and decompression and/or 
file format conversion. A second video card can, on certain platforms, support 
a second monitor on the same computer. This can be useful in situations 
when even the largest monitors don't provide adequate screen real estate. 
For example, all the menus and palettes for an image-editing package can be 
displayed on one monitor, leaving the second one for just the image. Or 
metadata can be input on one screen, with the image occupying another.
Some LCD monitors will take either analog or digital input signals. Running 
with digital input avoids the need to convert digital to analog (and back again) 
and may result in a slightly better image. Be aware that in order to utilize an 
LCD with digital inputs, the computer driving it must have a video card with 
digital outputs (usually a DVI port) and the correct cable must be used.  
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalD-08.html (2 of 2) [4/28/2003 2:28:13 PM]
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
pdf fillable form; convert word to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in
create a fillable pdf form online; pdf form filler
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Delivery
6D. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
DELIVERY
Key Concepts 
introduction
networks
concerns
speed
trends
monitors
evaluation
image quality
printers
technologies
evaluation 
P
RINTERS
As long as computers are bulky, display devices low resolution and hard on 
the eyes, battery technology in its infancy, and the communications 
infrastructure bound by cables, the desire to create printouts from digital 
images will endure. However, the costs of actually making high-resolution 
images available online, in formats that can be printed via a number of 
platforms and a range of printers, should not be underestimated. Before 
making promises to deliver print-quality images in a networked environment, 
verify that the technical infrastructure is up to the task, and consider the 
additional storage costs associated with online access.  
P
RINTER 
T
ECHNOLOGIES
Today, black and white printing is dominated by two technologies: Inkjet 
printers, which squirt liquid ink through tiny nozzles onto the paper, and laser 
printers, which use a light source to create charges on a photoconductive 
drum, allowing it to attract dry ink particles (toner) that fuse onto paper. Inkjet 
printers have become quite inexpensive, but are slower than lasers and 
generally not designed for high volume printing. High end production laser 
printers can produce well over 100 pages per minute at 600 dpi. 
Both technologies have been adopted for color. Color inkjet printers come in 3- 
and 4-color models. Color lasers are much more expensive, both for initial 
purchase and for the cost of consumables. Color inkjets and lasers are both 
substantially slower than their black and white counterparts, color inkjets 
average about 5 pages per minute for text and 1 page per minute for full page 
graphics. Color lasers are faster, averaging 12 pages per minute for text, and 
2 pages per minute for full page graphics. 
Several other technologies are available for color printing. These include dye 
sublimation, solid ink, and thermal wax. Dye sublimation is especially 
significant in that it can produce true continuous tone color printouts, though it 
is extremely slow and requires special coated paper. 
For larger scale color printing, Electronics for Imaging makes the Fiery line of 
print servers, which enable digital color photocopiers and digital presses to be 
networked to serve as high volume, high quality color printers. The resulting 
combination is called a copier-printer. Resolution is generally 400 dpi 
maximum, but is supported for whatever paper sizes the copier normally 
uses. 
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalD-09.html [4/28/2003 2:28:14 PM]
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
convert word to pdf fillable form online; add fillable fields to pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
pdf form fill; c# fill out pdf form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Delivery
6D. Technical 
Infrastructure: 
DELIVERY
Key Concepts 
introduction
networks
concerns
speed
trends
monitors
evaluation
image quality
printers
technologies
evaluation 
P
RINTERS
: C
RITERIA FOR
E
VALUATION
l
Resolution and dot spacing
l
Color reproduction
l
Tonal representation
l
Image enhancement capabilities
l
Document size supported
l
Single versus double-sided printing (simplex/duplex)
l
Media supported (plain paper, coated paper, transparencies, 
envelopes)
l
Speed and capacity
l
Page description languages and raw image formats supported
l
Networking capabilities
l
Cost  
Computer Considerations
Not all printers are supported on all computing platforms, so check for 
compatibility. Also, make sure software drivers are available for the specific 
operating system version you are using. Check for availability of the correct 
networking or direct connection capability. Print accelerators can offload 
some of the burden of printing from the computer's CPU. 
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/technical/technicalD-10.html [4/28/2003 2:28:15 PM]
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
attach file to pdf form; add signature field to pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
converting pdf to fillable form; convert word to fillable pdf form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
I
NTRODUCTION
Using the Web to make retrospective resources accessible to a broad public 
raises issues of image quality, utility, and delivery at the user's end. User 
studies have concluded that researchers expect fast retrieval, acceptable 
quality, and complete display of digital images. This leads cultural institutions 
to confront a whole host of technical issues that do not exist in the analog 
world.
Technical Links Affecting Display·
l
File format and compression used 
l
Web browser capabilities 
l
Network connections 
l
Scaling routines and programs 
l
End user computer and display capabilities
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-01.html [4/28/2003 2:28:16 PM]
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. ' odt convert to pdf Dim odt As ODTDocument = New ODTDocument("C:\1.odt
create a pdf form to fill out; create a pdf form to fill out and save
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
convert pdf file to fillable form; change font size in fillable pdf form
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
F
ILE
F
ORMATS AND
C
OMPRESSION
Factors in choosing a file format for display include the following:
l
Bit depths supported
l
Compression techniques supported
l
Color management
l
Proprietary vs. standard file format
l
Technical support (Web browser, user computer and display 
capabilities)
l
Metadata capability
l
Fixed vs. multi-resolution capability
l
Additional features, e.g., interlacing, transparency
Although there is a multitude of file formats available, the 
Table on Common 
Image File formats summarizes important attributes for the eight most 
common image formats in use today. 
Despite interest in finding alternative formats for master files, TIFF remains 
the defacto standard. For access images, GIF and JPEG files are the most 
common. PDF, while not technically a raster format, is used extensively for 
printing and viewing multi-page documents containing image files. PDF also 
offers a zooming feature that supports variant views of an image. PNG has 
been approved by the 
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for Web use, and 
as browser support for the format becomes more complete, PNG may replace 
GIF for network access. (See an 
RLG DigiNews FAQ on the future of PNG.) 
As larger and more complex images are being intended for Web access, 
there is increasing interest in file formats and compression techniques that 
support multi-resolution capabilities, such as 
FlashPix
LuraWave
JTIP and 
wavelet compression, such as MrSID from 
LizardTech or Enhanced 
Compressed Wavelet from 
ER Mapper
JPEG 2000 also utilizes wavelet 
compression and supports multi-resolution capabilities. 
DjVu is a recently-
developed format optimized for scanned documents. It offers efficient 
compression of both bitonal images (using the JBIG2 variant, JB2), as well as 
of full color images, using wavelet compression. Unfortunately, all of these 
formats require users to download and install plug-ins in order to view them 
on the Web.
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-02.html (1 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:17 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Resolution on Demand: Several new file formats and compression 
techniques allow users to zoom in by clicking on a section to view at a higher 
resolution. Click on the image above to view an example of a Zoom Feature.
The compression technique used and level of compression applied can affect 
both speed of delivery and resulting image quality. The 
Table on 
Compression summarizes important attributes for common compression 
techniques. AIIM offers a questionnaire (
AIIM TR33-1998) to assist in 
choosing a compression method to match user requirements. 
The following Table compares file sizes resulting from using various 
compression programs on a 300 dpi, 24-bit image of an 8.45 x 12.75-inch 
color map. 
Table: File Size and Compression Comparison 
Compression Type File Size Compression Ratio
Uncompressed TIFF 28.4 MB             --
TIFF-LZW
21.2 MB          1:1.34
GIF (8 bit)
4.0 MB          1:6
JPEG-low
10.4 MB          1:2.7
JPEG-high
1.2 MB          1:24
PNG
20.8 MB          1:1.37
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-02.html (2 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:17 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
Effects of Lossy Compression on Text/Line Documents: Click on these 
images to view a close-up version. The left image is saved in GIF format, the 
one on the right as JPEG. The compression artifacts are most evident around 
the sharp-edged characters in the enlarged version of the right image.
Courtesy of Bob Rosenberg, The Edison Papers Project.  
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-02.html (3 of 3) [4/28/2003 2:28:17 PM]
Digital Imaging Tutorial - Presentation
7. Presentation
Key Concepts 
introduction
formats/compression
web browsers 
network
scaling
monitors
image quality 
guidelines 
additional reading 
W
EB
B
ROWSER
C
APABILITIES
The Web supports few raster file formats: JPEG, GIF, and incomplete support 
for PNG. Other formats require use of a specialized viewer, such as a plug-in, 
applet, or some other external application. This limitation tends to dampen 
use as it places more demand on the user's end. In some circumstances, the 
value of the format is sufficiently compelling to overcome user resistance, as 
is the case with PDF files. Adobe lessens user constraints by supplying a 
browser plug-in with its PDF reader. If the stand-alone Acrobat Reader is 
already available when the browser is installed, most will self-configure to 
launch it when a PDF file is encountered. Some institutions convert non-
supported formats or compression schemes on the fly to ones that are Web-
supported (e.g., wavelet to JPEG) in response to user request. 
N
ETWORK
C
ONNECTIONS
Users probably care most about speed of delivery, as noted 
earlier. Several 
variables control access speed, including the file size, network connections 
and traffic, and the time to read the file from storage and to open it on the 
desktop.
© 2000-2003 Cornell University Library/Research Department
http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/presentation/presentation-03.html [4/28/2003 2:28:18 PM]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested