convert pdf byte array to image byte array c# : Convert pdf fill form software application dll winforms html web page web forms USAID_eBook15-part1182

º ɼ`9ʐÕʌʐÜ\ʐLɼʃi-Ì>ÌÃvʐÀ vÀɼV>Ó䣣]»Ûɼ`iʐ«Àʐ`ÕVÌɼʐʌ
ʐvÌɹi*À>iʂiʃÌ ʐÕʌ`>Ìɼʐʌ]«ʐÃÌi`-i«ÌiʇLiÀ£x]Ó䣣]
A Kenyan man in Nairobi sends money through a pioneering mobile phone service called M-PESA, which 
has sky-rocketed in popularity for its low costs, convenience, and ability to link rural, underserved users 
with nancial services, many for the rst time. | AFP Photo: Tony Karumba 
and the Internet 7 years to meet this mark. The 
mobile phone…took only three. Today, there are 
nearly 6 billion mobile phone subscriptions world
wide. In Africa there were 49 million mobile phones 
in 2002. Fast-forward 9 years to today: There are 
xää
ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ°
 Þ
Óä£È]
ÌɹiÀi
Üɼʃʃ
Li
iÃÌɼʇ>Ìi`
1 billion mobile phones in Africa.
-
2
The mobile 
phone boom is, quite simply, without parallel in its 
scale. Mobile phones can fundamentally change our 
approach to service delivery and transform USAID’s 
role in the world. It shifts the question from “How 
can we effectively deliver services?” to “How can we 
enable others to run us out of the service delivery 
business?” And it all begins with mMoney. 
Ó
ɹÌÌ«\ÉÉÜÜÜ°
mobileactive.org/blog/infovideo
Mobile Money at Scale 
mMoney accelerates financial inclusion for the 
1.8 billion people with access to a phone but not 
a bank. It allows people to safely store and seam
lessly send money to friends and family in need. 
Five years ago, only 6 million Kenyans had access 
Ìʐ
L>ÃɼV
wʌ>ʌVɼ>ʃ
ÃiÀÛɼVið
/ʐ`>Þ]
ʌi>ÀʃÞ
£x
ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ
Kenyans, or about 70% of the country’s adult popu
lation, use Safaricom’s mMoney product, M-PESA, 
to manage their money.
-
-
When sticking money in a 
mudjar or under a mattress is the norm, the ability 
to make secure payments and store money safely 
means financial inclusion. Payments also become 
the rails upon which other financial services—sav-
ings, remittances, credit, and insurance—ride. 
3 Safaricom, press release, “M-PESA Upgrade, Outage on Saturday Night,” 
iLÀÕ>ÀÞ
ʍ]
Óä£Ó]
ɹÌÌ«\ÉÉÜÜÜ°Ã>v>ÀɼVʐʇ°Vʐ°ʂiÉɼʌ`iÝ°«ɹ«¶ɼ`r£xÇä°
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  129 
Convert pdf fill form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
Convert pdf fill form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf with fields to fill in; add attachment to pdf form
The story of M-PESA is often told as a story 
of financial inclusion. But it is also a story of scale. 
From 2007 to March 2011, the value of M-PESA 
transactions topped 828 billion Kenyan shillings, 
or half of Kenya’s GDP. M-PESA has 33,000 stores 
across Kenya, which outnumbers bank branches 
by a factor of 20. This begs the question: What is 
possible when mMoney reaches scale and becomes 
networked infrastructure? 
By signicantly lowering transaction costs, 
mMoney unlocks the private sector to create 
sustainable fee-for-service models.
Already, in 
Kenya, 700 innovative businesses exist because 
they integrated with M-PESA to lower transaction 
costs enough to profitably extend critical services 
to people in remote areas. In agriculture, the insur-
ance industry offers farmers index-based products 
using M-PESA to collect small premiums and 
issue payouts. In health, M-PESA’s bill-pay func-
tion helps expectant mothers save for maternity 
health care. In water, rural communities access safe 
water and pay for it using M-PESA.
This is hap-
pening all across Kenya without formal develop-
ment assistance. 
mMoney at scale enables a responsive and 
accountable government. 
mMoney is already 
being used to collect fees and pay social transfers, 
which can be quickly disbursed and tracked, 
engendering accountability and responsiveness 
across government. But mobile phones can do 
still more than this; they can fundamentally alter 
the relationship between people and their govern-
ments. They can empower people to track and 
report human rights abuses, organize and amplify 
the voice of their community, report on the 
efficacy of government programs, and access and 
4 Jake Kendall, Bill Maurer, Phillip Machoka, and Clara Veniard, “An Emerg-
ing Platform: From Money Transfer System to Mobile Money Ecosystem” 
(UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2011-14, May 3, 2011), avail-
able at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1830704. 
share critical information, like where and when 
to vote. In Uganda, the Electoral Commission 
used SMS to remind voters to vote. In Kenya, 
BungeSMS empowers citizens to send a text mes-
sage to their Member of Parliament about their 
policy preferences. Put simply, the mobile phone 
begins to replace the elusive “social compact,” 
which depends on an expansive physical infra-
structure, with a “mobile compact” that depends 
on something sitting in your pocket right now. 
mMoney enables direct philanthropy. 
Imagine a world where money can move from 
your mobile phone to a recipient in Tanzania—in 
an instant. Imagine if you—not your govern-
ment or some large foundation unaccountable to 
you—could pick a project, small business, NGO, 
or entrepreneur you liked, and donate directly using 
your mobile phone. Imagine a world where people 
in developing countries determine for themselves 
what the donor community funds. It will not be 
long until something akin to mobile PayPal exists, 
facilitating payments, credit, loans, and donations 
across borders without an intermediary organiza-
tion. It will, of course, require someone on the 
other end to monitor the progress of the project you 
funded and evaluate the impact. But even that can 
be done using a mobile phone—using regular text 
messages to stay updated. This upends the current 
landscape—it democratizes the donor community. 
Instead of a few huge donor agencies determining 
development priorities and then contracting the 
work to a few huge private firms, people in develop-
ing countries determine their own priorities, and 
through the simple power of the mobile phone, 
people around the world support them. 
Galvanizing the Mobile Money 
Ecosystem 
Kenya allows us to glimpse this future. It paints a 
picture of what’s possible when mMoney reaches 
130  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
convert pdf forms to fillable; convert pdf to form fill
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
create a fillable pdf form in word; convert word document to fillable pdf form
scale. But Kenya is a unique case. Without a 
successful precedent to follow, Safaricom CEO 
Michael Joseph boldly bet on mMoney, invest-
ing $30 million up front. Kenya’s Central Bank 
Governor, Professor Njunguna Ndung’u, gave 
Safaricom room to run, allowing mMoney to pro-
ceed even when the requisite regulations did not 
exist. And with nearly 80% market share, an aber-
ration in the developing world, Safaricom could 
sprint. It was a perfect storm. And you cannot 
easily replicate a perfect storm. 
That Kenya is the only example of mass 
scale amid 120 mMoney deployments worldwide 
shows that the private sector cannot do this alone. 
Michael Joseph recently said, “For there to be 
another M-PESA type success with the scale both 
in terms of volumes of transactions and values, 
you would need the public sector, particularly the 
donor community, to get behind it to generate the 
volume of transactions and the acceptance of the 
system from the recipients.” Here’s why: 
Think back to the history of the credit card. It 
took half a century for the credit card to gain trac-
tion in the United States. Customers did not want 
to sign up for credit cards that merchants were not 
yet accepting, and merchants did not want to invest 
in a credit card system that had few customers. In 
£ʍxn]
 >ʌʂ
ʐv
ʇiÀɼV>
ʃ>ÕʌVɹi`
 >ʌʂ ʂ ʇiÀɼV>À`]
the first credit card issued by a third-party bank and 
accepted by many merchants. To ensure that these 
merchants would receive the business to make it 
worth their while, Bank of America mass-produced 
credit cards and mailed them unsolicited to bank 
customers. This same chicken-and-egg problem 
confronts mMoney today: Customers won’t sign up 
for the service unless there is a merchant conve-
niently nearby, and merchants won’t sign up unless 
there are customers to serve. 
USAID has an incredible opportunity to over-
come this challenge and scale mMoney platforms 
across the developing world. First, we must be 
intellectually engaged in how to best strengthen 
this sector. Second, we must be a courageous user 
and advocate of these systems. If we lever our 
political presence and financial footprint to get 
governments, corporations, and implementing 
partners—that represent big payment streams— 
to issue social transfers, collect fees, or pay their 
employees and beneficiaries through mobile 
phones, we can generate a customer base for 
mobile-network operators and allay the concern of 
merchants. Third, we must share our infrastructure 
to enable growth. This means ensuring that post 
offices and donor-supported agriculture depots 
can serve as cash-in and cash-out points. Fourth, 
we must support public goods such as financial 
switches and consumer education. Fifth, we must 
expand access to mobile phones to ensure that this 
future is for everyone, including women, as there 
are still 300 million fewer women than men in the 
developing world who own a mobile phone. 
USAID’s role will diminish as mMoney opens 
new markets, empowers responsive and account-
able governance, and enables direct philanthropy. 
This vision is no doubt going to take time. There 
will be false starts. But we wholeheartedly believe 
that the mobile phone brings into view that “ulti-
mate day,” when the fortune of each individual 
rests in his or her hands and USAID’s role is 
altogether transformed. 
Priya Jaisinghani heads the Mobile Solutions team 
for USAID. 
Charley Johnson is a Presidential Management Fellow 
on the Mobile Solutions team. 
The views expressed in this essay are their own, and do 
not necessarily represent the views of the United States 
Agency for International Development or the United 
States Government. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  131 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
attach image to pdf form; add fillable fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf; acrobat fill in pdf forms
Glen Scott Allen and Michael Joseph 
Global Tech + Local Trust: 
A Formula for Sustainable Development  
M
rs. Khan awakens at 4:00 a.m. on a cold 
morning in her modest house in a remote 
province of Pakistan. This is the day she 
makes her monthly trek to a distant market to 
spend her husband’s remittance check. It’s a dif
ficult journey with a long list of possible obstacles. 
Will the bus arrive on time? Will it break down on 
the road to the market? Will there be papers to fill 
out that she cannot read? If any of a dozen things 
go wrong, she will be struggling to survive until the 
next month, and the next journey. 
-
On her way to the bus stop, Mrs. Khan passes 
a concrete shell of a building. Originally intended to 
be a local market and exchange, a place where people 
like her could reliably receive remittance checks, its 
construction was halted years ago. Its demise was the 
result of a tangled web of shrinking budgets of for
eign aid agencies, the corruption and inertia of the 
national government, and the local innate distrust of 
projects created and managed by foreigners. 
-
In ways numerous but not always obvious, 
Mrs. Khan’s stressful journey and that unfinished 
building are two symptoms of the same problem. 
Mrs. Khan is just one of the millions of people in 
developing countries who depend for their very sur-
vival on remittances. The process of sending, receiv-
ing, and using these funds is fraught with difficulties. 
And while these remittance and diaspora networks 
have existed for hundreds of years, the technology 
supporting them really hasn’t changed. In most cases, 
a husband or brother or child still puts hard currency 
into a postal system and hopes for the best. 
There are alternatives. The hawala (“transfer of 
financial obligation”) networks that exist primarily 
in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia are more 
flexible but fraught with their own problems. The 
strength of hawala networks is that they don’t depend 
on the actual transfer of hard currency; rather, a 
remitter may simply establish an “obligation” with a 
local hawaladar (hawala broker), who then “trans-
fers” that obligation to another hawaladar in the 
remitters’ native country. The in-country representa-
tive can then “pay out” that obligation to the recipi-
ent through cash, goods, or services. These networks 
are especially dependent on trusted ties between 
families and neighbors, and can sidestep barriers 
132  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
create fill pdf form; convert pdf fill form
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free
adding a signature to a pdf form; fillable pdf forms
Pakistani shopkeepers count currency at their store in Islamabad on December 15, 2011. 
AFP Photo: Farooq Naeem 
such as governments, banks, and currency transfer 
fees. However, precisely because they sometimes 
operate outside the boundaries of governments and 
businesses, they are unregulated, and therefore come 
under suspicion of trafficking in illegal transactions— 
especially as funding for terrorist organizations. 
The advantages and challenges of diaspora/ 
remittance/hawala networks are deeply related to 
the issues faced by any international development 
agency that seeks to deliver basic health, education, 
sanitation, or other services to remote populations. 
However, new technologies could prove key to solv-
ing not only Mrs. Khan’s problems, but also those 
of development agencies working to improve the 
quality of life for her and millions of people like her. 
It is clear that diaspora networks play an 
important role in the support of their families 
and communities. According to recent World 
Bank studies, reported remittances from diaspora 
ʌiÌÜʐÀʂÃ
Ài>Vɹi`
fÎx£
Lɼʃʃɼʐʌ
ɼʌ
Ó䣣]
ÜɼÌɹ
untold additional billions in goods and services.
Recognizing the power of such networks, USAID 
recently established the Diaspora Networks 
Alliance, which it describes as a framework that 
enables partnerships—between USAID, other 
donor organizations, the private sector, and diaspo-
ras—built on “knowledge-generation, engagement, 
and operational work, with the purpose of promot-
ing economic and social growth in the countries 
1 Sanket Mohapatra, Dilip Ratha, and Ani Silwal, “Outlook for Remit-
tance Flows 2012–2014: Remittance Flows to Developing Countries 
ÝVii`
fÎxä
 ɼʃʃɼʐʌ
ɼʌ
Ó䣣]»
7ʐÀʃ`
 >ʌʂ
ɼ}À>Ìɼʐʌ
>ʌ`
iÛiʃʐ«-
ment Brief 17, http://siteresources.worldbank.org/TOPICS/Resourc
es/214970-1288877981391/MigrationandDevelopmentBrief17.pdf
-
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  133 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
create a pdf form to fill out; pdf signature field
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. NET component to convert adobe PDF file to html
convert pdf to fill in form; pdf fillable form
of origin.” USAID has explicitly recognized the 
potential of these financial networks to change the 
very nature of international development models: 
“Of all of the capital that flows abroad from the 
United States, an estimated twenty-five percent or 
more are recorded remittances, which makes them 
second only to private capital flows ….”
Currently, however, diaspora support programs 
are generally unorganized, informal, and discon-
nected from long-term, sustainable development 
strategies, and none suggest a link between family 
remittances and local development goals. Many of 
the diaspora engagement models rely on existing 
international financial infrastructures, such as brick-
and-mortar banks, national ministries of finance, 
and large international monetary agencies. Each of 
these enabling structures brings with it a set of limi-
tations and distrusts. Additional problems include 
lack of grass-roots engagement, discontinuity 
between micro- and macrodevelopment planning, 
insufficient knowledge of local needs, research data 
that is never shared with local professionals, and 
even local attempts to malign or undermine projects 
by forces hostile to “foreign intervention.” 
Recent innovations in communications 
technologies offer an excellent opportunity to 
effectively engage diaspora networks in these larger 
issues of development programs while maintain-
ing their local authenticity. The goal is creation 
of a self-sustaining, long-term model that can be 
replicated for different diaspora networks across 
the globe—a model that leverages pre-existing 
streams of money, information, technology, and, 
most important, trust. We call such a model 
the Facilitated Diaspora Network, enabled by 
the latest Internet and telecommunications 
2 USAID fact sheet, “Diaspora Networks Alliance: Framework 
for Leveraging Migrant Resources for Effective Development & 
Diplomacy,” http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PDACM860.pdf. 
technology, initiated by international development 
entities, but then handed off to members of the 
specific diaspora network to manage and maintain. 
The first step in creating a Facilitated Diaspora 
Network is the establishment of a web-based 
“hub”—a clearinghouse website to be used as a central 
point of entry and information for current remitters, 
including family, community, and third-party donors. 
Such a website would include background informa-
tion about a community, forums for discussions about 
local issues, a catalogue of local development needs, 
links to international development agency efforts and 
resources, and tools to enable contributions directly to 
specific family recipients and development projects. 
The second step involves utilizing the hub as 
a centralized link between remitters/donors and 
receivers/projects, and would draw on innovations in 
mobile communications that enable direct monetary 
transfers, bypassing many of the obstacles encoun-
tered not only by Mrs. Khan, but by the aid agencies 
Üiʃʃ°
ʌ
iÃÌɼʇ>Ìi`
x°x
Lɼʃʃɼʐʌ
«iʐ«ʃi
ɼʌ
Ìɹi
ÜʐÀʃ`
already have cell phones, and recent innovations in 
microcell technology, smartphone capabilities, and 
mobile-money support have demonstrated that 
mobile device-based approaches are effective even 
in some of the most remote areas of the world. The 
GlobalGiving and Aceh Besar “Midwives with Mobile 
Phones” programs are examples of this success. 
In its simplest form, such a network would 
allow a remitter to sign into an account at a “hub” 
website, make a payment to the network’s central 
fund, and designate a family recipient. The recipi-
ent would receive notice of the transfer, and his 
or her mobile device would store the information, 
which could then be used at a market or with 
a local agent to pay for goods and services. The 
facilitating entity would handle the actual transfer 
of funds. As an option, the family remitter could 
designate a portion of the donation to a particular 
local aid project which, depending on the project’s 
134  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
/ɹiÞ>ÀiʐvÌiʌ>ÃʐÕÀViʐv«Àɼ`i>ʇʐʌ}Ìɹi«iʐ«ʃi
from the village, town, or region they serve. 
scale, might be overseen by an international or 
local entity. For community-based remitters and 
third-party donors, the hub would serve as a con-
venient portal for making contributions (similar to 
GlobalGiving) and accessing real-time information 
about development progress. For the remitter and 
receiver, the process would be painless, efficient, 
and reliable. For donor and recipient countries, 
and the facilitating international entities, it would 
be centralized, accountable, and transparent. 
Still, even with such a streamlined remittance/ 
donor process in place, one might ask how the 
remitters can be convinced to divert even a small 
portion of their limited funds to local rather than 
family aid. The key will be making a clear case for 
how local development is aid to their families: a 
market that makes Mrs. Khan’s long trek unnec-
essary, a clinic that improves her health security, 
or a school that educates her children. For many 
remitters, such contributions will fulfill religious 
obligations for charitable giving. In other cases, the 
donations might go to local businesses, serving as 
investments offering future returns. Additionally, 
a portion of the facilitating entity’s revenue would 
be re-invested in the development projects, provid-
ing a sustainable base of funding. Taken together, 
these factors result in diaspora participants who 
are invested in aid efforts as their projects—to an 
extent they never have been for projects conceived 
and financed entirely by foreign donors. 
Admittedly, there are challenges to this 
approach, such as concerns about the diversion of 
funds, and the differing monetary-exchange and 
security policies of the donor and recipient coun-
tries involved. However, there are several reasons 
both types of nations would welcome and even 
actively support such networks. Diaspora “hubs” 
will allow for much greater oversight and trans-
parency than currently exists, particularly with 
the essentially invisible hawala networks. Money 
that enters the facilitated network is not available 
for the illegal networks. Perhaps most important, 
many nations have declared their desire to dra-
matically increase remittances and are fully aware 
that they receive no taxes or fees from the invisible 
transfers, suggesting they will be highly motivated 
to work with facilitating agencies to overcome 
these and other regulatory and security challenges. 
Ultimately, diaspora and hawala networks 
survive on the trust they engender among their 
constituencies: 
/ɹiÞVʐʇ«ÀɼÃiÀiʃ>ÌɼÛiÃ]ʌiɼ}ɹLʐÀÃ]>ʌ`
acquaintances. 
/ɹiÞ>Ài}À>ʌÌi`VÀi`ɼLɼʃɼÌÞLÞÜʐÀ`ʐvʇʐÕÌɹ
among networks of people who know one another. 
Therefore, any model that seeks to capture 
their dynamism and flexibility must recognize the 
importance of maintaining their specific and local 
authenticity. 
By tapping into the philanthropic potential 
of diaspora networks, enabling them with innova-
tive technologies, and coordinating their efforts 
with those of international aid entities, we believe 
it is possible to expand and strengthen commu-
nity relationships, engender local and sustainable 
development efforts, increase the funds available 
for such efforts, and create a new and stable model 
of international development. 
Glen Scott Allen is Director of International 
Development Projects at Leonie. 
Michael Joseph is Director of Strategic Development 
at Leonie. 
The views expressed in this essay are their own, and do 
not necessarily represent the views of the United States 
Agency for International Development or the United 
States Government. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  135 
Gregory Howell 
Six Degrees of Mobile Money  
in Afghanistan 
“In a spirit of leadership and cooperation, we must bring 
together the resources and competencies of our fellow 
agencies, the private sector, country leaders, and the 
people we serve—and in the process, build a broader 
community of development partners.” 
— USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah
T
raditionally, USAID Missions have man-
aged development programs by segment-
ing activities into technical offices such 
as democracy and governance, economic growth, 
health, education, and infrastructure. Cross-
fertilization takes place occasionally, when mutual 
interests are identified; but meaningful collaboration 
is rare. The focus on mobile money in Afghanistan 
breaks out of the usual stovepipes, demonstrating 
how dynamic teams bringing expertise from dif-
ferent disciplines in partnership with host-country 
counterparts can contribute to a collective goal— 
even in a difficult operating environment. 
1 Dr. Rajiv Shah, “Leadership Qualities Essential to Delivering Mean-
ɼʌ}vÕʃ
,iÃÕʃÌÃ]»
ÝiVÕÌɼÛi
iÃÃ>}i
Ìʐ
1- 
-Ì>vv]
Õʌi
£x]
Ó䣣°
Ten years after the introduction of mobile-
phone technology to the country, more than half 
of all Afghans have mobile phones, and more than 
80% have access to a mobile-phone network.
But only 7% of Afghans have a bank account.
3
By 
leveraging the mobile-phone network to provide 
financial services to the unbanked, key public- and 
private-sector services can be improved to serve 
hundreds of thousands of women and men across 
the country. With mobile money, a teacher can 
receive her salary in full and on time in a remote 
district; a police officer can transfer funds to his 
family back in his home village; and a business-
woman can repay her microloan without having 
to spend valuable time away from her business. 
Once customers have registered for the ser-
vice, they can visit a local mobile-money agent to 
2 “Afghanistan: Communications,” The World Factbook, Central 
Intelligence Agency, continually updated, www.cia.gov/library/
publications/the-world-factbook/
, accessed March 14, 2012. 
3 Eltaf Najafizada and James Rupert, “Afghan Police Paid by Phone 
to Cut Graft in Anti-Taliban War,” Bloomberg, April 14, 2011, www.
bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-13/afghan-police-now-paid-by-phone-
to-cut-graft-in-anti-taliban-war.html
136  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
An Afghan youth uses his mobile phone to take pictures of U.S. Marines from 1st Battalion, 8th Marines 
as they patrol the town of Musa Qala on January 18, 2011. | AFP Photo: Dmitry Kostyukov 
withdraw actual cash that had been deposited in 
their mobile wallet. The agent serves as the ATM, 
exchanging mobile money for cash once the cus-
tomer inputs a PIN number into the phone. Mobile-
money service provider bank accounts pool funds 
from all clients in at least four banks to diversify risk. 
Mobile money can fundamentally transform 
the lives of Afghans, just as it has in Kenya, the 
Philippines, and a growing list of countries around 
the world. USAID’s strategic approach focuses on 
three main areas of intervention: 
ʌ}>}ɼʌ}
ÜɼÌɹ
ʂiÞ
ÃÌ>ʂiɹʐʃ`iÀÃ]
ɼʌVʃÕ`ɼʌ}
}ʐÛ-
ernment ministries, private-sector companies, 
and international donors 
ʌÃÕÀɼʌ}>ʌ>««Àʐ«Àɼ>Ìiʃi}>ʃ>ʌ`Ài}Õʃ>ÌʐÀÞ
environment and support from relevant host 
country government agencies 
ʌVʐÕÀ>}ɼʌ}ɼʌʌʐÛ>ÌɼʐʌÌɹÀʐÕ}ɹ«ÕLʃɼVɻ«ÀɼÛ>Ìi
partnerships that could lead to greater financial 
inclusion and development results 
USAID/Afghanistan started engaging with 
key partners in the mobile-money initiative in 
early 2011. Because only one of the four mobile-
network operators—Roshan—had a mobile-
money service, USAID encouraged the other 
three operators to focus on mobile money as a 
corporate priority. In March 2011, USAID orga-
nized the Afghanistan Mobile Money Stakeholder 
-ÕʇʇɼÌ]
ÜɹiÀi
ʇʐÀi
Ìɹ>ʌ
£xä
Ài«ÀiÃiʌÌ>ÌɼÛiÃ
from government, donors, NGOs, and com-
panies interested in mobile money highlighted 
the challenges and opportunities facing this 
nascent financial service and created a network 
of interested stakeholders. A U.S. government 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  137 
A customer (left) signs up for mobile banking at a supermarket on March 3, 2011, in Port-au-Prince, 
Haiti. | Photo: Kendra Helmer/USAID 
interagency working group was subsequently 
established to address implementation issues, and 
the Association of Mobile Network Operators of 
Afghanistan was formed to encourage ongoing 
dialogue between the main partners. 
Stakeholder collaboration was important as 
Afghanistan’s Central Bank worked to provide 
robust supervision of mobile-money services to 
protect consumers and prevent fraud. USAID had 
previously helped the Central Bank to adopt a 
new regulation for electronic money institutions 
in 2009, incorporating international best practices 
for mobile-money oversight. In November 2011, 
with additional support from USAID, the Central 
Bank formally adopted revisions to the exist-
ing regulation, lowering barriers to market entry 
and strengthening mechanisms to fight money 
laundering and interdict terrorist financing. These 
important amendments incorporated the expertise 
of representatives from the U.S. Department of 
the Treasury, World Bank’s Consultative Group 
to Assist the Poor, the Bill & Melinda Gates 
Foundation, and the GSM Association, as well as 
local banks and telecommunications companies. 
Expanding the Application to 
Benet Development Priorities 
USAID has committed to partnering with Afghan 
public- and private-sector organizations to expand 
the use of mobile financial services through the 
fx
ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ
ʐLɼʃi
ʐʌiÞ
ʌʌʐÛ>Ìɼʐʌ
À>ʌÌ
Õʌ`]
launched in March 2011. By August, $2 million 
had been granted to three mobile-network 
operators working to initiate mobile-money 
banking for 100,000 Afghans by the end of 2012. 
One grant will focus on paying teacher sala-
ries through a cell phone—the result of a dynamic 
team formed to pioneer new ways of harnessing 
mobile-money technology in Afghanistan and 
improving the efficiency and transparency of 
138  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested