convert pdf byte array to image byte array c# : Convert pdf forms to fillable SDK Library project winforms asp.net web page UWP USAID_eBook17-part1184

The Afghanistan Clean Energy Program has evaluated dozens of solar lanterns for use in rural 
Afghanistan, providing more than 7,000 to Wakhi, Kyrgyz, and Kuchi nomadic peoples in northern 
Afghanistan, as well as Hazar and Pashtun communities in Central and Southern Afghanistan. 
Photo: Robert Foster/Winrock International 
Nations Foundation that combats climate change 
and poverty through new cooking technologies for 
rural areas. 
The appeal of technology-based solutions 
for the bottom of the pyramid is understandable. 
Compared with the slow, invisible solutions of 
public policy and community mobilization, social-
impact technologies are tangible manifestations of 
hope that have an immediate social impact. 
The Perennial Problem of 
Dissemination 
Their promise aside, no one has painted the big 
picture of how to move social-impact technologies 
from the lab to the land. During E.F. Schumacher’s 
“small is beautiful” Appropriate Technology move-
ment of the 1970s and 1980s, philanthropic and 
government-funded initiatives failed because of 
limited funds, limited scale, low-quality products, 
and poor management. After management pro-
fessor C.K. Prahalad proclaimed that there was a 
“fortune at the bottom of the pyramid” in 2004, 
the paradigm shifted toward a market-centric view. 
Companies calling themselves “social enterprises” 
began manufacturing, marketing, selling, and 
distributing social-impact products to the poor. By 
using business models, social enterprises attempt to 
be accountable to customers, transparent to share-
holders, and financially self-sufficient to continue 
pursuing their social missions. 
Social entrepreneurial efforts are being 
recognized by international organizations as 
innovation-based, market-oriented solutions that 
hold the promise of scaled social impact. The 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  149 
Convert pdf forms to fillable - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
auto fill pdf form from excel; create a pdf form that can be filled out
Convert pdf forms to fillable - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert word form to pdf with fillable; convert pdf fillable form to word
World Economic Forum’s Technology Pioneers of 
2012 includes four start-ups that deliver a product 
or service for the bottom of the economic pyra-
mid. USAID’s Development Innovation Ventures 
awards grants to compelling new development 
solutions, many of which are based on new tech-
nologies for the poor. 
But social enterprises are no panacea to 
moving social-impact technologies into the hands 
of the people they were designed to benefit. 
The bottom-of-the-pyramid market is riddled 
with obstacles. For example, there are more 
than 627,000 Indian villages spread over 3.2 
million square miles. These villages face finan-
cial hardships, difficult living conditions, and 
limited access to new knowledge. In many cases, 
social-impact technologies are still too expensive 
for rural end users, and they require intensive, 
in-person marketing. The costs of acquiring new 
customers are sky-high. 
Problematic operating environments also pose 
obstacles to technology-based social ventures. It is 
difficult to find startup funding that does not require 
social enterprises to produce immediate results. In the 
Indian Social Enterprise Landscape Survey conducted 
by Intellecap, a social sector advisory firm, 44% of 
social enterprises named financing as their main 
challenge. Only 37% of social enterprises that sought 
funding received enough. Additionally, unsupport-
ive regulatory environments overburden small- and 
medium-sized enterprises with red tape. 
Technology-based social enterprises that engage 
customers through the market have potential, but 
they face numerous obstacles. What needs to be done? 
Innovating Entrepreneurial Efforts 
to Change the World through 
Technology 
Based on my experiences in rural India, I believe 
that technology-based social enterprises and others 
working at the bottom of the pyramid need to 
rethink doing business in these ways: 
Branding: These are NOT technologies 
for poor people 
Who wants to be told that they are poor? Nobody 
I’ve met. So why do so many social enterprises 
push their technologies as products for poor 
people? Social-impact products should be mar-
keted as desirable, aspirational products. End users 
should want to invest in them. This does not mean 
that social enterprises should use marketing gim-
micks. They should just pay attention to managing 
their brands differently. 
Pricing: $30 a month is too expensive, but 
$1 a day is affordable 
One of the greatest takeaways from microcredit 
and pay-per-use shampoo sachets is that pric-
ing innovations are required to sell anything at 
the bottom of the pyramid. If a social enterprise 
requires a poor customer to buy a solar lantern, in 
full, with cash, then solar lanterns may not sell. A 
rental or credit scheme is much more cost-effective 
and appropriate for such a customer’s income 
stream. Creating microentrepreneurs who rent out 
technologies is another way to generate income 
and improve livelihoods. This model has already 
been successful for solar lanterns and mobile-
phone chargers in India. 
After-sales Service: Prevent rural areas 
from becoming dumping sites for broken 
technologies 
Working technologies will inevitably fail. When 
a social-impact technology fails, there can be 
consequences. First, the technology ceases to bring 
social benefits. Second, it sucks money out of a 
population that is already poor. Third, it becomes 
garbage—thrown out onto the road. (I have seen 
150  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable
change font in pdf fillable form; create fillable forms in pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
c# fill out pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form
improved cooking stoves sit broken in the corners 
of rural Indian kitchens.) Fourth, it wrecks the 
social enterprise’s brand, shakes customer confi-
dence, skews perceptions around new technolo-
gies, and distorts the market for new entrants. For 
example, I learned that solar lanterns are gaining 
a bad reputation in Chennai’s peri-urban areas 
because too many low-quality, quick-to-break 
lanterns have been imported from China. Social 
enterprises selling higher-quality lanterns have 
difficulty convincing potential customers of their 
improvements. 
After-sales service is just as important as initial 
sales because it sustains the long-term impact and 
sales of social-impact technologies. It also gives 
social enterprises an opportunity to interact with 
their customers, creating a bidirectional learning 
experience that will improve product design and 
quality. This would be a huge improvement on 
the current situation, as thorough failure rates and 
failure analyses for a wide range of social-impact 
technologies are not available. 
Ecosystem: Put the “social” back into social 
entrepreneurship 
Moving social-impact technologies from the lab to 
the land requires building up an ecosystem that is 
bigger than one social enterprise. Social enterprises 
must partner with other businesses and organiza-
tions to share resources like local knowledge and 
community connections. Social enterprises should 
involve organizations from across sectors (private, 
public, and social) at all levels (from grassroots to 
international). They can be catalysts for building 
robust ecosystems around themselves, and these 
ecosystems can ultimately support rural customers. 
One example is SELCO, a company that installs 
solar home lighting systems in southern India 
and is famous for forging financial relationships. 
When the company began, rural banks were not 
financing any solar lighting technologies, especially 
for risky low-income customers. SELCO convinced 
a bank to offer the nation’s first solar-consumer 
loan program. This had a snowball effect on solar-
industry financing and helped rural farmers segue 
into formal banking. 
Private investment markets can play a key role 
in financing technology-based social enterprises. 
For example, India has a handful of social-impact 
investment firms, like Omidyar Network and 
Aavishkaar, which provide patient capital to 
social enterprises. Additionally, India’s National 
Innovation Council has proposed a new fund 
that will be supported by the government, private 
investors, philanthropists, and bilateral and multi-
national institutions. These are pioneers, and more 
financing is needed. 
Moving Beyond Technological 
Invention toward Business 
Innovation 
Worldwide, socially conscious engineers are creat-
ing technologies that improve the livelihoods of 
low-income households. However, technologi-
cal invention is not enough. Technologies must 
get into the hands of end users, or else they are 
designed in vain. If social entrepreneurs and 
bottom-of-the-pyramid organizations begin doing 
business differently, market mechanisms can 
widely disseminate these products. Only through 
these innovations can social-impact technologies 
impact millions of lives as intended. 
Diana Jue is a Master’s student in MIT’s Department 
of Urban Studies and Planning and Co-Founder of 
Essmart, a social impact technology distributor in India. 
The views expressed in this essay are her own, and do 
not necessarily represent the views of the United States 
Agency for International Development or the United 
States Government. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  151 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. including ASP.NET web services and Windows Forms application. After creating a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF
convert html form to pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF forms in C#.NET framework project. A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; create fill in pdf forms
Aniket Bhushan 
Big Data  
I
nternational development as a field of research 
and practice has been a laggard in using big data 
and powerful analytics. Much of the data are of 
poor quality, and there are huge gaps in the infor-
mation base we rely on. This situation is changing 
faster than anyone predicted, and the set of tools 
driving this evolution represent the single-most 
important trend in development. The proliferation 
of mobile technologies, computing power, and 
democratization of analytics within an open-
source, open-data environment will fundamentally 
change the way we think about and do develop-
ment. I provide a synopsis of the most impactful 
developments in three areas: the base (data) layer, 
the analysis layer, and the feedback (data) layer. 
The Base Layer: Open Data  
and Big Data  
How do we know what we know in the field of 
international development? What is the informa-
tion, or evidence base? Who generates it and how? 
There are at least three main collectors, sorters, 
and repositories of development information: 
international institutions (such as the United 
Nations (UN), World Bank, and International 
Monetary Fund), national and sub-national 
official public-sector institutions, and the private 
sector. Change is afoot in each. 
The open-data push by international insti-
tutions such as the World Bank and African 
Development Bank is making a huge amount of 
information available to a wide range of stakehold-
ers. Similarly, the UN’s Global Pulse initiative is 
creating a platform to harness new data streams 
and stimulate collaborative inquiry. 
Groups such as Development Gateway and 
AidData have pushed further to show what is pos-
sible by this opening. A good example is a tool like 
Development Loop,
1
which plots all World Bank 
and African Development Bank projects at precise 
geographic locations across Africa and overlays 
feedback sourced from the intended beneficia-
ries. This full circle or loop is a reminder of the 
1 “Development Loop App,” AidData, http://www.aiddata.org/content/
index/Maps/development-loop-app
, accessed December 21, 2011. 
152  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Batch create adobe PDF document from multiple forms in VB Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; convert word to pdf fillable form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF Since RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK is based on .NET framework ASP.NET web service and Windows Forms for any
change font size in fillable pdf form; change font size pdf fillable form
An Iraqi woman shows an SMS text message she received on her mobile phone from the Iraqi Ministry 
of Health asking people to take precautions by avoiding crowded places and using handkerchiefs to avoid 
catching the u. | AFP Photo: Ali Al-Saadi 
importance of data transparency and universal 
standards. Opening up aid data in a standardized 
format will make geocoding a potent tool for real 
transparency and accountability. 
To appreciate what a game-changer open data 
can be, consider the situation in Uganda. Research 
conducted there in 2006–2007 by the United 
ɼʌ}`ʐʇɻL>Ãi`
ɼʌɼÌɼ>ÌɼÛi
*ÕLʃɼÃɹ
7ɹ>Ì
9ʐÕ
Õʌ`
revealed that the government was unaware of the 
amount donors were planning to spend for devel-
opment that year. The planned expenditure was 
more than double what the government was aware 
of. Indeed, financial resources flowing into the 
country were far higher than had been estimated.
Ó
º ɼ`
 Õ`}iÌÃ
ɼʌ
1}>ʌ`>]»
*ÕLʃɼÃɹ
7ɹ>Ì
9ʐÕ
Õʌ`]
ÜÜÜ°«ÕLʃɼÃɹ
whatyoufund.org/resources/uganda/
-
, accessed December 21, 2011. 
The World Bank’s Chief Economist for Africa 
calls the next example a “statistical tragedy.” Most 
of Africa’s population lives in countries that still use 
an outdated (1960s) method of national income 
accounting to generate fundamental data, such as 
gross domestic product (GDP). Ghana only shifted 
to the 1993 UN system of national accounts last 
year. When they did so, they found their GDP was 
62% higher than previously thought, catapulting 
the country to “middle income” status.
If even the most basic information is riddled 
with problems then what do we really know? Data 
reliability is one issue, but time lag is another. Too 
3 Blogs.worldbank.org, “Africa’s Statistical Tragedy,” blog entry by Shan-
tayanan Devarajan, October 6, 2011, blogs.worldbank.org/africacan/
africa-s-statistical-tragedy
, accessed October 6, 2011. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  153 
>Ìɹ>ʌ
>}ʃi]
ºʐLɼʃi
ÀʐÜ`ÃʐÕÀVɼʌ}
ɼʌ
Ìɹi
iÛiʃʐ«ɼʌ}
7ʐÀʃ`]»
presentation for MIT University’s Entrepreneurial Programming and 
Research on Mobiles, 2008, 
often, the data used in international development 
decisions are stale. The information base we rely 
on needs to be bolstered by building bridges with 
new sources and data streams. 
Opening up proprietary private-sector data 
for use in international development will be 
a game-changer in the coming years. To date, 
public institutions have been leading on open 
data (for instance, under the purview of the Open 
Government Partnership). But it is the private 
sector, the main repository of “big data,” that is 
the holy grail. If you total all the data collected by 
the U.S. Library of Congress (one of the largest 
«ÕLʃɼVɻÃiVÌʐÀ
Ài«ʐÃɼÌʐÀɼiî]
ɼÌ
ÜʐÕʃ`
Li
>LʐÕÌ
ÓÎx
terabytes as of April 2011. Walmart processes and 
ÃÌʐÀiÃ
>LʐÕÌ
Ó]xää
ÌiÀ>LÞÌiÃ
«iÀ
ɹʐÕÀt
The Analytics Layer: 
Virtualization, Visualization 
Driving Democratization 
High-power analytics revolutionized the commer-
cial sector and can now do the same in the social 
sector. At its core, analytics is about understanding 
relationships and patterns. Analytics helped retailers 
profit from unlikely trends, and it can do the same 
for complex social systems. Bringing this capacity 
to bear on development challenges, such as food 
security and urbanization, is just the beginning. 
The explosion of mobile sensors—especially 
in the developing world—is facilitating a transfor-
mation. Mobile-phone subscriptions have grown 
vÀʐʇ
ʃiÃÃ
Ìɹ>ʌ
Çxä
ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ
­ʃiÃÃ
Ìɹ>ʌ
>
ÌɹɼÀ`
ɼʌ
developing countries) at the start of the 2000s to 
ʇʐÀi
Ìɹ>ʌ
x
Lɼʃʃɼʐʌ
­{
ÌɼʇiÃ
ʇ>ʌÞ
ɼʌ
`iÛiʃʐ«ɼʌ}
countries as in the developed world today). About 
ʐʌiɻwvÌɹ
ʐv
>ʃʃ
ÃÕLÃVÀɼLiÀÃ
ʃɼÛi
ʐʌ
ʃiÃÃ
Ìɹ>ʌ
fx
>
4 Abhishek Metha, “Big Data: Powering the Next Industrial Revolu
tion,” Tableau White Paper, 
-
www.tableausoftware.com/learn/whitepa-
pers/big-data-revolution, accessed March 29, 2012. 
day.
x
The developing world is the leading driver of 
mobile big data. Voice, text, transactional, loca-
tional, and positional information can be overlaid 
with the base data layer described earlier (income, 
health, education, and other indicators generated 
by official sources) to produce new insights into 
real behavior and complex incentive structures. 
Take the example of the Engineering Social 
Systems lab.
6
Coupling terabytes of mobile-phone 
data with Kenyan census information, the lab is 
modeling the growth of slums to inform urban 
planners about where to locate services such as 
water pumps and public toilets. In Uganda, the 
same group is developing causal structures of food 
security, and in Rwanda, they used big mobile-
phone data and a random survey to model how 
different people react to economic shocks. This con-
stitutes a fundamental shift from theoretical models 
to models informed and built on real networks. 
Development analysis has long been limited 
to correlations and inferences based on correla-
tions. For the first time, big data coupled with 
high-power analytics are opening up the possibility 
of, if not entirely causal dynamics, then at least 
more robust inferences. Our traditional methods 
of inquiry have conditioned us to think in terms 
of generalizing on the basis of random sampling. 
But for the first time, the proliferation of mobile 
sensors is making possible highly targeted yet 
nonintrusive inquiry. 
The rapid emergence of new data streams 
has kept pace with the development of analyti-
cal capacity to draw useful inference out of them. 
Twitter, for instance, generates information about 
x
assets.en.oreilly.com/1/event/20/txteagle_
%20Crowd-Sourcing%20on%20Mobile%20Phones%20in%20the%20
Developing%20World%20Presentation.pdf, accessed March 29, 2012. 
6 “Big Data for Social Good,” Engineering Social Systems collaboration, 
ess.santafe.edu/bigdata.html, accessed December 21, 2011. 
154  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
the size of the entire U.S. Library of Congress 
in two weeks and, together with Facebook, has 
already shown its efficacy during the Arab upris-
ings. At the heart of this evolution, open-source 
software systems and tools allow the simultaneous 
collection, categorization, and analysis of vari-
ous data types—from Twitter hashtags, to videos, 
to positional data and machine IDs. Swift River, 
developed by Ushahidi, is an example of a free 
open-source platform that enables rapid simulta-
neous filtering and verification of real-time data. It 
also visualizes the information in dashboards that 
the average user can understand. 
This is particularly powerful for monitor-
ing immediate post-crisis developments when the 
information flow suddenly increases, but it is also 
only useful if immediately analyzed. Similar appli-
cations were successfully implemented and yielded 
important insights on population movements both 
in the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti as well 
as flooding in Pakistan. 
Virtualization (of platforms) and visualiza-
tion (of large complex information to make it 
engaging for the average user) inspire the com-
munity- or crowd-driven problem solving that 
advances democratization of analytics. For example, 
Data Without Borders, a pro-bono data scientist 
exchange, organizes “data dives” to help leverage the 
potential of information that NGOs, civil-society 
organizations, and others possess but do not have 
the time, capacity, or inclination to process. 
We at The North-South Institute are playing 
our own small part in comprehensively visualizing 
Canada’s engagement with developing countries 
on aid, trade, investment, migration, and a range 
of other flows through the recently launched 
Canadian International Development Platform.
7 Canadian International Development Platform, hosted by The North-
South Institute, www.cidpnsi.ca. 
The Feedback Layer: Deep 
Context, Complex Microsystems, 
Real-time Loops 
The efficacy of the feedback layer is also new. 
Targeted crowdsourcing has already come a long 
way. The Ushahidi experience in Kenya, for 
instance, also worked for monitoring elections 
in Afghanistan. Mobile-phone SMS platforms 
have been adapted to make participatory budget-
ing more inclusive in hard-to-reach areas, such as 
conflict-affected South-Kivu in the Democratic 
Republic of the Congo—and results have been 
encouraging. The experience of the Development 
A “statistical tragedy”: Most 
of Africa’s countries still use 
a 1960s method of accounting 
to generate fundamental data, 
such as GDP. 
Loop initiative has already shown that, with cre-
ative use of available technologies and committed 
partners, it is possible to obtain direct feedback 
from intended recipients of interventions. 
To understand how powerful the feedback 
layer can be, consider the experience of the Mobile 
Accord. At the initiative of the World Bank’s 
World Development Report 2011, the Accord 
ran Geo Poll, an SMS-based targeted polling in 
the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The poll 
asked 10 questions that included sensitive topics, 
such as sexual violence against women. The survey 
produced 1.2 million text responses, and the 
outputs were turned into the video “DRC Speaks,” 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  155 
which captured people’s responses to questions 
about their experiences in their own words. This 
ended up being one of the largest surveys ever 
conducted in the country.
Some of the most valuable data in develop-
ment come from surveys, including household, labor 
market, living standard, and other social surveys. But 
there are two key problems with such surveys: time 
(they take time to implement and can only be done 
infrequently) and high costs. Mobile technology is 
helping get around these issues. The World Bank is 
piloting an interesting initiative in Latin America 
called “Listening to LAC” (L2L)
9
where several types 
of mobile technologies are being deployed to con-
duct real-time (higher frequency) self-administered 
surveys, to generate panel data on key questions 
pertaining to vulnerability and coping strategies. 
While still in a pilot phase, this is the first time such 
information is being collected near real-time and 
with lower costs than large national surveys. 
There is a pattern here. In the base layer, more 
and more data are opening every day. In the analyt-
ics layer, experimental ideas are leaving the lab for 
real-world application. Virtualization and visualiza-
tion are helping foster new communities geared 
toward collaborative problem solving. Similarly, 
in the feedback layer, tools are also democratizing. 
Ushahidi created an easy-to-use version of their 
implementation, called CrowdMap. Anyone who 
knows how to set up an email account can use 
the tool to set up their own incident mapping of 
whatever trend, alert, or issue on which they are 
interested in getting feedback from the crowd. 
8 The World Bank, “DRC Speaks,” World Development Report 2011 
multimedia library, wdr2011.worldbank.org/media-library, accessed 
March 29, 2012. 
9 “Getting the Numbers Right: Making Statistical Systems a Real Plus 
for Results,” The World Bank: IBRD Results, March 2010, siteresourc
es.worldbank.org/NEWS/Resources/Gettingthenumbersright4-19-10.
pdf
-
, accessed March 29, 2012. 
At sunset, a young girl tests out a new seesaw on 
a playground built by the Elizabeth Glaser 
Pediatric AIDS Foundation at the Mkhulamini 
Clinic in Swaziland. This year, the Foundation 
will launch a USAID-funded, ve-year program 
to expand services preventing mother-to-child 
transmission of HIV. | Photo: Jon Hrusa, Elizabeth 
Glaser/Pediatric AIDS Foundation 
Looking Ahead 
How we think about data and analysis in the field 
of international development is changing rapidly, 
and faster than many organizations that “do devel-
opment” are prepared for. 
The open-data movement has widened access 
to a broad range of basic contextual information. 
A similar push is needed to open private-sector 
big data in the service of social good. Powerful 
analytical tools and collaborative platforms are 
dramatically changing what is possible for even 
the most intractable challenges like understanding 
socioeconomic risks and responses, dealing with 
urban planning, and better preparing for emergen-
cies. For the first time, we have a feedback layer, 
which has made possible deep and near real-time 
awareness of what is working or not working, 
where, and why. Together, big data, democratized 
analytics, and the ability to tap deep contexts will 
change the way we think and do development in 
the coming years. 
Aniket Bhushan is a Senior Researcher at The North-
South Institute and leads the Canadian International 
Development Platform. The views expressed in this 
essay are his own, and do not necessarily represent 
the views of the United States Agency for International 
Development or the United States Government. 
156  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  157 
Cory O’Hara 
Developing-country Producers and  
the Challenge of Traceability 
A
t the opening of the last century the 
introduction of mass production tech-
niques (the assembly line, specialization, 
and replaceable parts) fostered unprecedented 
expansion of consumer goods through the produc-
tion and distribution of identical goods at increas-
ingly lower unit costs. In the early decades of the 
21st century, the basic concept of a commodity as 
a mass-produced unspecialized product is evolv-
ing with the growing recognition that every unit 
of product has uniquely identifiable traits that can 
be tracked from origin to consumption and that 
confer different market value. 
The implications of product traceability, or 
tracking products from origin to consumption 
(“farm to fork”), affects virtually all development 
sectors—agriculture (food safety), health (coun-
terfeit pharmaceuticals), security, the environ-
ment (carbon footprint), governance (diversion of 
commodities), and the application of technology. 
While the impact of traceability is most immedi-
ate for goods entering developed country mar-
kets, traceability will increasingly be adopted in 
developing countries, particularly given the rise of 
a growing consumer middle-class and the relatively 
higher levels of fraudulent or dangerous products 
entering those markets. 
Governments and donors are implementing 
numerous programs that seek to expand opportu-
nities for developing-country producers, particu-
larly in the agriculture sector, to export directly 
to developed country markets. The benefits are 
obvious—higher prices and improved quality 
standards. The costs related to implementation 
of traceability, however, will require substantial 
investment, and will be especially challenging for 
the small-scale agricultural producers targeted by 
assistance programs. The challenges for integrat-
ing women producers will require special atten-
tion, given that female smallholder farmers are 
generally both less capitalized and have less access 
to new technology. 
As developing countries seek to diversify 
their economies beyond exports of primary agri-
cultural commodities and integrate into global 
manufacturing supply chains, the challenges 
158  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested