itextsharp how to create pdf with a table design and embed image in c# : .Net fill pdf form Library application API .net html web page sharepoint Value-of-search0-part1371

Jacques Bughin
Laura Corb
James Manyika
Olivia Nottebohm
Michael Chui
Borja de Muller Barbat
Remi Said
July 2011
The impact of Internet 
technologies: Search
High Tech Practice
.Net fill pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
add attachment to pdf form; pdf fillable form creator
.Net fill pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; convert pdf forms to fillable
This report examines the value of the search technologies used to navigate the Internet and is part of a 
series that focuses on different, Internet-related technologies. 
Online search technology is barely 20years old, yet it has profoundly changed how we behave and get 
things done at work, at home, and increasingly while on the go. It empowers people and organizations in 
every corner of the world. A world without search technology has become unimaginable—so much so 
that we take it for granted and underestimate its value. Until now, attempts to indicate the worth of search 
technologies have relied on statistics such as thetrillions of online searches made annually worldwide, 
thebillions of dollars advertisers pay to appear on search pages, or the revenue earned by those that 
provide search capabilities and search marketing services. But these measures fail to fully capture the 
constant creation of economic value that the click of a search button enables through, for example, 
improved productivity, more transparency in the marketplace, the discovery of new information, and the 
ability to link up with the right people and companies. Such benefits are usually attributed to the Internet. 
But search technologies are a vital cornerstone of the Internet edifice.
The aim of this report is to better assess the far-reaching value of search technologies, looking at how they 
unlock value and identifying the major beneficiaries. We cast our research net wide, wanting to understand 
how search technologies affect businesses, individuals, and public service entities, so the report homes 
in on eleven constituencies—for example, advertisers and retailers in business, and health care and 
education in public services. It also looks at five countries to show how the use of search technology varies 
depending upon geography and economic circumstances: to date, much of the analysis has concentrated 
on the US market. Finally, it identifies nine ways—six more than are commonly acknowledged—in which 
search technologies create value.
1
Wherever possible, the value created is quantified.
The task is not easy, because a hallmark of search technology is that it is a perpetual work in progress. 
However, the findings of this report suggest that the value is already large—at the time of the research, 
some $780billion annually worldwide, with $540billion of that amount contributing directly to GDP. It 
must also be noted that these figures (and those throughout the report) are based on analysis at the time 
of research i.e. early 2011, using available data mostly 2009 and 2010 data. Still we believe that the $540 
billion estimate is conservative. But it is 25 times as great as the profits generated by the search industry 
alone. These are gross figures. We have not tried to deduct costs. Nor do we examine disruptions in other 
value chains caused by search technologies or privacy issues. Though these topics are important, they 
are not the focus of this report. In addition, given the pace at which the search environment develops, we 
know that the values calculated at the time of the research will already have been surpassed by the time of 
publication. Nevertheless, to the best of our knowledge, the report is the most comprehensive assessment 
of the benefits and value of search technologies conducted to date. This report is by no means the last work 
on the impact of search on the economy—but just the beginning. The technology itself is still relatively early 
in its evolution, and many more innovations are expected. In addition, the uses and applications of search 
technology are still emerging, and consequently the impact on business, the economy, and society is still 
relatively unknown.
This report is an independently authored McKinsey report that draws from research by McKinsey’s 
Technology, Media, and Telecom Practice, academic and public sources, research conducted with 
Google, as well as research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) to better understand the impact of 
technology on business and the economy. Other work on the impact of the Internet has been published 
 Some of the nine ways are potentially related but when we are quantifying totals, we are careful not to 
separate effects into mutually exclusive categories.
Preface
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file
convert word to pdf fillable form; attach image to pdf form
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Users can set graph annotation properties, such as fill color, line color and transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file. C#.NET WPF PDF
convert fillable pdf to html form; auto fill pdf form fields
by MGI, including an analysis of the Internet’s contribution to the global economy
1
and the value that Big 
Data—that is, the huge pools of information on which much modern economic activity depends—creates 
for organizations and the economy.
2
The authors of this report are grateful for the review and comments of Martin Baily, a senior adviser to 
McKinsey and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution; Erik Brynjollfson, Schussel Family Professor 
at the MIT Sloan School of Management and director of the MIT Center for Digital Business; and Hal 
Varian, chief economist at Google and emeritus professor in the School of Information, the Haas School of 
Business, and the Department of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley. We are grateful for 
the vital input and support of leaders in McKinsey’s technology, media and telecom practices, including 
Tarek Elmasry, Adam Bird, Jürgen Meffert, and Geoff Sands.
Jacques Bughin 
Director, McKinsey & Company 
Brussels
Laura Corb 
Director, McKinsey & Company 
New York
James Manyika 
Director, McKinsey & Company 
San Francisco
Olivia Nottebohm 
Principal, McKinsey & Company 
Silicon Valley
Michael Chui 
Senior Fellow, McKinsey Global Institute 
San Francisco
Borja de Muller Barbat 
McKinsey & Company 
New York
Remi Said 
McKinsey & Company 
Paris
July 2011
 Matthieu Pélissié du Rausas, James Manyika, Eric Hazan, Jacques Bughin, Michael Chui, and Rémi Said, 
Internet matters: The Net’s sweeping impact on growth, jobs, and prosperity, McKinsey Global Institute, May 
2011.
 James Manyika, Michael Chui, Brad Brown, Jacques Bughin, Richard Dobbs, Charles Roxburgh, and Angela 
Hung Byers, Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity, McKinsey Global Institute, 
May 2011.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting passwordSetting); C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; adding a signature to a pdf form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Users can set graph annotation properties, such as fill color, line color and transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project.
change font size pdf fillable form; adding signature to pdf form
Contents
Executive summary 
1
Search scale 
9
How search unlocks value 
15
The value of search: Whobenefits and how? 
22
The economic value of search 
38
The future of search 
41
Appendix: Methodology 
45
Bibliography 
49
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
allow users to attach to pdf form; convert pdf fillable form to word
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are
create a writable pdf form; pdf signature field
1
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Forbillions of people around the world, the Internet has become an essential component of their everyday 
social and business lives. And though they seldom give it a moment’s thought, the search engines that 
help them navigate through the plethora of pages, images, video clips, and audio recordings found on the 
World Wide Web have also become essential. Search technology—shortened simply to “search” in the IT 
world and referred to as such in the rest of this report—is only two decades old, but it is a cornerstone of the 
Internet economy.
1
The numbers prove its utility. In 2010, an average Internet user in the United States performed some 1,500 
searches, while some 1.6trillion searches a year are conducted globally.
2
Few attempts have been made to assess the value of all this activity. Various reports point to the large 
amount of money advertisers spend to appear prominently on search pages as an indication of its worth. 
The profits of those that provide search services—portals, search engines, and search platforms—are 
another indication. Yet no study has comprehensively assessed the benefits and value of search. This 
report aims to rectify that, showing how search creates value and who benefits. Where possible, it 
quantifies the value created. Among our key findings:
ƒ Most work to date has identified three sources of search value: time saved, price transparency, and the 
raised awareness harnessed by advertisers. Though these are important, they only partially capture 
the ways in which search creates value, and so underestimate its worth considerably. We identified six 
more sources of value, and there will undoubtedly be others as search continues to evolve.
ƒ A conservative estimate of the global gross value created by search was $780billion in 2009. Across the 
five countries studied, only 4percent of the gross value created by search was captured by the search 
industry.
ƒ Worldwide, some 65percent of search value flowed directly through to GDP in 2009, though the split 
between developed and developing countries was uneven. Seventypercent of total search value 
contributed to GDP in the developed countries in the study—the United States, France, and Germany. 
An average 40percent contributed toward GDP in the two developing countries in the study—Brazil 
and India. Put another way, search contributed to between 1.2 and 0.5percent of GDP in the five 
countries studied.
ƒ Between 30 and 65percent of the value of search accrued to individuals rather than companies. In 
emerging countries such as Brazil and India, people—that is, information seekers and consumers—
capture the biggest proportion of the value created by search relative to companies.
ƒ The return on investment (ROI) for those that deploy search are high. Advertisers do well, earning an 
average ROI of 7:1. Other constituencies fare better still. Based strictly on the value of time saved, 
individuals in our study—that is, individual information seekers and content creators, consumers, and 
entrepreneurs—earn an ROI of 10:1 on average. Enterprises earn still more, with an ROI of 17:1 as a 
result of time saved.
 Search Engine History: http://www.searchenginehistory.com/.
 ComScore qSearch.
Executive summary
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are
convert excel to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form online
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A professional PDF form reader control able to read PDF form field in C#.NET class. C#.NET Demo Code: Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in C#.NET.
convert html form to pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
2
ƒ Despite the clear, measurable benefits of search to the economy, it would be a mistake to think about 
search only in terms that are easy to quantify. For example, search helps people find information in times 
of emergencies and helps them seek out people with similar interests—perhaps a support group for 
those coping with disease. Search also shifts the balance to empower individuals or small organizations 
with something to share that would otherwise reach only a small audience. None of these types of 
benefits may be easy to measure, but they are powerful nevertheless.
ƒ There are, of course costs associated with search.  Though we do not examine them deeply in this 
report, we do recognize potential negative impacts, particularly for individual businesses - e.g., many of 
the gross benefits come at the expense of other companies, or potential losses where search facilitates 
piracy or undermines intellectual property protection.
ƒ Search continues to evolve rapidly as a result of changes in user behavior; the content that is 
searchable; search technology; where search occurs—for example, within social networks and on new 
devices; and the arrival of new participants in the search market.
Search size
The size of search can be hard to conceive. More than onetrillion unique, worldwide URLs were indexed 
by Google alone by 2010.
3
Some 90percent
4
of online users use search engines, and search represents 
10percent of the time spent by individuals on the Web, totaling about four hours per month.
5
Knowledge 
workers in enterprises spend on average five hours per week, or 12percent of their time, searching for 
content.
6
The list could go on. People and organizations are in love with the utility of search.
In retrospect, it was inevitable that search would become so big. The power of Moore’s and Metcalfe’s 
laws
7
meant that it became easy and cheap to capture, digitize, and store massive amounts of information; 
the explosive growth of Internet usage meant the creation of still more Web content; and the efficiency of 
online transactions lured commerce and business online. As a result, a mechanism for discovering and 
organizing Internet information became imperative, and search was born. Users could now find what they 
wanted, and providers of information, products, and services could locate the right audience at negligible 
cost, encouraging still more content.
But the way people search has since added another dimension to its utility. When people search online, 
they are signaling information about themselves: what they are looking for, when, and in what context—for 
example, the Web page they visited before and after the search. Such information can be harnessed by 
those seeking to deliver more relevant content or advertising, often a source of value to providers and 
search users alike, though it is this dimension that also raises debate about privacy.
How should one think about the value of all this search activity? Often, it is considered in terms of the 
profits made by the search industry—that is, those that provide search capabilities and search marketing 
services. A very rough estimate of the industry’s profit margins
8
would indicate that, in the United States, 
an average search is worth three cents in profit to these companies. Yet the figure comes nowhere near to 
capturing a sense of the real worth of search if you consider even for a moment the very different ways in 
 http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/07/we-knew-web-was-big.html [Retrieved April 29, 2011].
 ComScore qSearch.
 McKinsey & Company for IAB Europe, Consumers driving the digital uptake: The economic value of online 
advertising-based services for consumers, September 2010.
 The hidden costs of information work, IDC white paper, March 2005, corroborated by McKinsey primary 
research.
 Moore’s Law, first described by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore, states that the number of transistors that 
can be placed on an integrated circuit doubles approximately every twoyears. In other words, the amount 
of computing power that can be purchased for the same amount of money doubles about every twoyears. 
Metcalfe’s Law, attributed to Ethernet inventor Robert Metcalfe, states that the value of a telecommunications 
network is proportional to the square of the number of connected nodes in the system.
 Typically, Internet search engines and classified search generate profit margins in the range of 20 to 
40percent, and search engine optimization (SEO) companies generate 10 to 20percent profit margins (based 
on McKinsey analysis of returns from public companies in 2008).
3
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
which individuals and organizations use it. Much more value is being created in the “search value chain” and 
captured by market participants outside of the search industry.
9
How search unlocks value
Most literature to date has looked at and quantified only three ways in which search creates value: by saving 
time, increasing price transparency, and raising awareness.
Our research suggests this underestimates value creation from search, because there are additional 
sources of value. Some of these can be estimated in financial terms. Others cannot, either because they 
are difficult to measure or because they create value to society that may not have direct financial worth. For 
example, it is hard to gauge the value of search, financial or otherwise, to students in developing economies 
who find course materials made available online by world-class universities.
In all, we identified nine sources of search value:
ƒ Better matching. Search helps customers, individuals, and organizations find information that is more 
relevant to their needs.
ƒ Time saved. Search accelerates the process of finding information, which in turn can streamline 
processes such as decision making and purchasing.
ƒ Raised awareness. Search helps all manner of people and organizations raise awareness about 
themselves and their offerings, in addition to the value of raised awareness from an advertiser’s 
perspective that has been the focus of most studies.
ƒ Price transparency. This is similar to “better matching” in that it helps users find the information they 
need, but here, the focus is on getting the best price.
ƒ Long-tail offerings. These are niche items that relatively few customers might want. With the help of 
search, consumers can seek out such offerings, which now have greater profit potential for suppliers.
ƒ People matching. This again entails the matching of information but this time focusing on people, be it 
for social or work purposes.
ƒ Problem solving. Search tools facilitate all manner of problem solving, be it how to build a chair, identify 
whether the plant your one-year-old has just swallowed is poisonous, or advance scientific research.
ƒ New business models. New companies and business models are springing up to take advantage of 
search. Without search, many recently developed business models would not exist. Price comparison 
sites are a case in point.
ƒ Entertainment. Given the quantity of digital music and video available, search creates value by helping 
to navigate content. For a generation of teenagers who pass on TV to watch videos on YouTube instead, 
search has also enabled a completely different mode of entertainment.
This list is not exhaustive —and there are other sources of value  that result from the nine above, e.g., 
lowering production costs, and speeding innovation, through better matching,
The value of search: Who benefits and how?
Search affects the activities of individuals and all sorts of organizations, so we cast our research net wide 
when trying to assess its value. We wanted to look at its impact on businesses, individuals, and public 
service entities, and so we examined 11 constituencies within these main groups—for example, advertisers 
 Profits by search industry are BOTH an over and underestimate of search’s value: some profits come at 
expense of other media; much of value does not convert to profit, e.g., value that accrues to consumers and 
other businesses.
4
and retailers in business, and health care and education in public services—analyzing how the nine sources 
of value affected each.
The results should be regarded as case studies that demonstrate the value of search rather than as a 
fully exhaustive analysis. If the task of quantification was too uncertain for some sources of value—such 
as calculating the value of better matching for retailers—or if the value was likely to be minor, it was not 
included in our analysis.
The study showed that value accrues to all constituencies. The three most-studied sources of search 
value—time saved, raised awareness, and price transparency—are important. However, the study 
illustrated the additional impact of the other six sources of value, emphasizing the extent to which previous 
views of how search creates value have been too narrow. Exhibit1 describes the sources of value for each 
constituency.
Here are some examples of how the different constituencies benefit from search:
ƒ The value of search to retailers was estimated in 2009 at 2percent of total annual retail revenue in 
developed countries and 1percent in developing ones. That is equivalent to $57billion to $67billion in 
the United States and $2.1billion to $2.4billion in Brazil.
10
ƒ Search-enabled productivity gains enjoyed by knowledge workers in enterprise were worth up to 
$117billion in 2009 in the five countries studied. The figures ranged from $49billion to $73billion in the 
United States to $3billion to $4billion in Brazil.
11
10  Estimated based on three methods: the methodology in Hal R. Varian, “Online ad auctions,” American 
Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 2009, Volume99, Number2, pp.430–34; McKinsey primary research 
in its digital marketing survey in 2007; and comScore and Nielsen data on total searches with an applied 
conversion rate.
11  Estimated based on 10 to 15percent productivity gain for knowledge workers in each country; number of 
knowledge workers based on International Labor Organization figures for France and Germany and McKinsey 
estimates; hourly wages based on IDC data.
Exhibit1
Primary sources of value from search
SOURCE:McKinsey analysis
Advertisers
Retailers
Entrepreneurs
Content creators
Enterprise
Consumers
Individual content creators
Individual information seekers
Health care
Education
Government
Constituencies
Better matching
Time saved
Raised awareness
Price transparency
Long-tail offerings
People matching
Problem solving
New business models
Entertainment
Sources of value
5
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
ƒ We calculated that the value created for consumers was worth around $20 per consumer per month in 
France, Germany, and the United States in 2009, and $2 to $5 in India and Brazil.
ƒ Depending on geography, 30 to 60percent of all Internet users—that is, some 204million people in 
the five profiled countries—create their own content.
12
The shares are higher in developing countries 
than in developed countries. It is hard to measure the value of search to these people, to the extent it 
helps make their voices heard. However, the sheer number of those who create content to express 
themselves in one way or another helps explain the power of social networks to influence social 
dynamics around the globe.
The economic value of search
Just how much is search worth? To date, no one has looked at its economic contribution at a country level, 
let alone a global level.
The analysis showed that search activity had measurable impact approaching gross annual value of 
$780billion in 2009,
13
similar to the GDP of the Netherlands or Turkey,
14
and making each single search 
worth around $0.50.
15
It should be remembered that this is only a partial estimate of the gross value of 
search, limited as our research was in terms of the number of constituencies and sources of value analyzed. 
In addition, the speed at which the search environment grows makes it likely that this figure has already 
been surpassed. Exhibit2 shows how the value was divided among the five countries studied.
12  eMarketer.
13  Estimated in 2009 dollars, calculated by applying averagepercentage of GDP attributed to search of France, 
Germany, and the United States to all developed countries and averagepercentage of GDP attributed to 
search to all emerging countries; McKinsey analysis. Note that this gross annual value includes value that is 
not captured in GDP statistics (e.g., consumer surplus), and that the portion that is captured in GDP statistics 
includes both the direct contribution of Internet sales and the indirect contribution of offline sales influenced 
by the Internet. 
14  International Monetary Fund.
15  ComScore qSearch estimates 1.6trillion searches conducted per year.
Exhibit2
Gross value created by search across countries, 2009
242
33
42
Measured value2
Additional value
not quantified1
Global
780
India
19
Brazil
17
France
Germany
United 
States
SOURCE:McKinsey analysis
1 These are only estimates and should not be taken out of context of the accompanying text.
2 These values are conservative. They include only quantified estimates and do not include value that we did not quantify, such 
as the improvement in the quality of a consumer’s shopping experience from better matching.
USD billions
ESTIMATES
6
Not all of this value shows up in GDP
16
—e.g.,  many consumer benefits, such as lower prices or the time 
consumers save, are not captured in these numbers. Some of these are likely to have an indirect impact 
on GDP. Some sources of value in education and health care that we did not quantify also boost GDP 
indirectly. The estimate of GDP impact should therefore be taken as conservative. It is nevertheless 
significant. The research showed gross value of $540billion, or 69percent of the measurable value, flowing 
through to GDP. This is roughly the nominal size of the global publishing industry in 2010
17
or Switzerland’s 
GDP in 2010.
18
Exhibit3 shows that this represents between 0.5 and 1.2percent of GDP in each of the countries studied.
The difference in the extent to which search contributes to GDP in developed and developing countries—
around 70percent and 40percent, respectively—can be explained by the much largerpercentage of 
total value that is captured in developing countries as a consumer surplus, which is not included in GDP. 
This is reflected in Exhibit4, showing that in the developed countries studied, individuals capture around 
30percent of measurable search value. In developing countries, the figure is around 60percent. The exhibit 
also indicates the extent to which search value is underestimated if the gauge to profits earned by the 
search industry is narrowed. Only 4percent of the value measured is captured by that industry globally.
Despite the clear benefits of search to the economy, it would be a mistake to think about search only in 
monetary terms. Search assists people in myriad ways in their daily lives. It helps them to find information 
in times of emergencies, for example, and to seek out people with similar interests—perhaps a support 
group for those coping with disease. Importantly, it also shifts the balance to empower individuals or small 
organizations with something to share that would otherwise reach only a small audience. None of these 
may have economic value, but they affect people’s lives.
16  We estimated GDP impact using an income approach.
17  Global Insights, Q2 2011 forecast. Includes publishing of books, brochures, musical books, newspapers, 
journals and periodicals, recorded media, and other publishing.
18  International Monetary Fund.
Exhibit3
Value created by search across countries, 2009
Contribution to GDP1
%
1 Represents only the portion of value that is attributable to GDP(e.g., the 73% of $242 billion in the United States).
73
73
72
45
34
69
27
27
28
55
66
31
France
GDP
Beyond GDP
Germany
India
242
Brazil
17
United 
States
780
33
100% =
Global
19
42
Measured value
%; USD billions
SOURCE:McKinsey analysis
1.2%
0.9%
0.9%
0.5%
0.5%
ESTIMATES
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested