itextsharp how to create pdf with a table design and embed image in c# : Create pdf fill in form SDK control project winforms azure windows UWP Value-of-search1-part1372

7
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
The future of search
The future of search remains hard to predict given the pace of change, but the value of search will only grow 
as we come to rely upon it more and more.
Search is at an early stage of its evolution. Searches for video or photographic images still largely depend 
on text searches by file names or key words, not image searches, for example, and technologies capable 
of capturing an image or sign in one language and translating it into another remain rudimentary. All this is 
work in progress.
But search’s main challenge going forward will be to keep pace with what it has helped unleash, namely 
more and more online content: one study estimated that the amount of digital information will grow by a 
factor of 44 annually from 2009 to 2020.
19
Amid thetrillions of gigabytes, the task of search technology will 
be to make sure the search is still quick and the results relevant.
Accordingly, the use of vertical search engines is on the rise. Ten times as many product searches are now 
executed on Amazon and eBay, both vertical sites, as on Google Product Search,
20
for example. Interest in 
semantic search engines, which try to understand more accurately the underlying intent of a search, also is 
on the rise.
Importantly, relevant search results are increasingly deemed to be personalized. Autonomous search 
agents that make suggestions based on personal data, including the user’s location, metadata, and more 
advanced algorithms, are in sight, and key players in the search industry now use the data available on 
social networks to enhance search results. Some 30percent of US Internet users now use social networks 
to find content, and 21percent use them to find videos.
21
19  IDC Digital Universe Study, sponsored by EMC, May 2010,  
http://www.emc.com/about/news/press/2010/20100504-01.htm.
20  ComScore qSearch.
21  eMarketer 2009.
Exhibit4
Value created by search across countries, 2009
Measured value
%; USD billions
SOURCE: McKinsey analysis
1 Search industry includes enterprise search, classified and local search, and search marketing.
2 SMBs = Small and medium-sized businesses.
NOTE: Numbers may not sum due to rounding.
27
27
28
55
66
100% =
Advertisers
Companies 
(including SMBs)2
Search 
industry1
Individuals
India
19
7
26
1
Brazil
17
26
15
3
France
33
42
27
4
Germany
42
41
28
4
United States
242
49
20
4
ESTIMATES
Create pdf fill in form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; add signature field to pdf
Create pdf fill in form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf; acrobat fill in pdf forms
8
The advent of smartphones, tablets, and other Web-connected portable devices also increases the 
potential of more personalized searches. And as search continues to grow, new applications will emerge. 
Already, analysis of what people are searching for is being used to better understand current trends and 
future outcomes in society. Researchers have, for example, looked at how search activity can help predict 
epidemics, unemployment, consumer demand, or even stock prices.
So what does all this mean for all those who participate in the search market?
Both individuals and organizations have much to look forward to. They will be able to search more quickly 
and more easily than before, and they can expect increasingly relevant results. But participants in the 
search industry are in for a turbulent ride. The competition is fierce, and as technology change accelerates, 
incumbents will be constantly challenged and disruptive change will become the norm.
Policy makers will also find themselves challenged as search gives rise to a whole host of issues that 
are difficult to arbitrate, given the ease with which information can be accessed through search. Privacy 
often grabs attention. But other salient issues include copyright and trademark infringement as well as 
censorship,
22
making search one of the toughest issues confronting technology policy. Any attempt by 
policy makers to arbitrate the interests of the different parties in the fast-paced, virtual world will likely leave 
them playing catch-up.
Researchers, too, will lag behind, trying to make sense of it all. But amid all the uncertainty, one thing is sure: 
the full implications of search on economies and societies are only now beginning to be revealed.
22  Hannibal Travis, “The future according to Google: Technology policy from the standpoint of America’s fastest-
growing technology company,” Yale Journal of Law & Technology, Spring 2008–09, Volume11.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Document Protect. Apply password to protect PDF. Allow to create digital signature.
change font size in pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
3.pdf" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password setting passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form.
attach file to pdf form; convert word document to pdf fillable form
9
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Forbillions of people around the world, the Internet has become an essential component of their everyday 
social and business lives. And though they seldom give it a moment’s thought, the search engines that help 
them navigate through the plethora of pages, images, video clips, and audio recordings found on the Web 
have also become essential. Search technology—shortened simply to “search” in the IT world and referred 
to as such in the rest of this report—is only two decades old, but it has become a cornerstone of the Internet 
economy.
People and organizations are in love with its utility. In January 2011, 200million Americans, 40million 
French, and more than 50million Germans conducted online searches.
23
More than 1.6trillion searches a 
year are currently conducted globally.
24
And consider the following:
ƒ By July of 2008, more than onetrillion unique URLs were indexed by Google,
25
the number having 
grown by 44percent
26
annually during the preceding tenyears. The growth of other major search 
engines such as Bing and Yahoo! is similarly large.
ƒ Some 90percent
27
of online users use search engines—that means 1.7billion people.
28
ƒ Search represents 10percent of the time spent by individuals on the Web, totaling about four hours 
each a month.
29
ƒ Approximately 25 percent of the traffic to the Websites of mainstream content creators results is 
referred by search engines.
30
ƒ Knowledge workers in enterprises spend on average five hours per week, or 12percent of their time, 
searching for content.
31
ƒ Depending on the geography, 30 to 60percent of all Internet users post content online, in the 
knowledge that search will help ensure that their voices are heard. That is more than 200million people 
in the five profiled countries.
32
People use search in all aspects of their lives. (See Box 1, “Search scope,” for a definition of how search is 
defined for the purposes of this report.) Worldwide, by early 2011, some 38percent of searches were work-
related, up from 34percent the previous year.
33
To many workers, including lawyers, investors, managers, 
23  ComScore qSearch.
24  ComScore qSearch.
25  The Official Google Blog, July 26, 2008.
26  The Official Google Blog, July 26, 2008 (data from 1998 to 2008).
27  ComScore qSearch.
28  ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators database.
29  McKinsey & Company for IAB Europe, Consumers driving the digital uptake: The economic value of online 
advertising-based services for consumers, September 2010.
30  McKinsey US clickstream data, 2009.
31  The hidden costs of information work, IDC white paper, March 2005, corroborated by McKinsey primary 
research.
32  eMarketer.
33  ComScore qSearch.
Search scale
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; create fillable pdf form
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a password setting passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form.
convert pdf file to fillable form; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
10
entrepreneurs, doctors, educators, and journalists, search has become indispensible. A survey of biology 
teachers in the United States, for example, found that 90percent used search engines to find presentation 
materials such as photos, audio, and other curriculum content and that 80percent used them to plan daily 
lessons.
34
The use of search outside of work also continues to grow, though less quickly, and is the starting point for 
many Web activities. For example, 82percent of US Internet users start with a search engine when they 
look for public information or complete a transaction with a governmental entity, while 80percent use a 
search engine as a starting point for health queries.
35
All of this search activity takes place in a world where only around 30percent of the population has Internet 
access
36
—though lack of access is not always an impediment to be able to search. Justdial is an Indian 
company that enables users to phone and ask an operator to conduct a search on their behalf, overcoming 
access as well as literacy problems. Justdial receives some 250,000 phone calls and conducts more than 
210,000 Web searches each day.
In retrospect, it was inevitable that search would become so powerful, given the forces at work. First, the 
power of Moore’s and Metcalfe’s laws
37
meant it became easy and cheap to capture, digitize, and store 
information. Second, the explosive growth of the Internet in terms of reach and usage generated still more 
users and content. And third, the efficiency of online transactions and the exchange of information and 
content lured commerce and business onto the Internet.
As a result of these forces, users needed a mechanism for finding and discovering information on the 
Internet. Early attempts to impose some order on it all mimicked the physical world in the form of online 
directories and catalogs, though these were soon overwhelmed by the scale and dynamism of online 
information. And so online search was born. (See Box 2, “A history of search.”) Users could now find what 
they wanted, while providers of information, products, and services—be they individuals or organizations—
could locate the right audience at negligible cost.
But users’ online behavior has since added another dimension to its utility. When people search online, 
they are signaling information about themselves: what they are looking for, when they are looking, and in 
what context—for example, the Web page they visited before and after the search. Such information can 
be harnessed by those seeking to deliver more relevant content or advertising, often a source of value to 
providers and searchers alike. This dimension also raises concerns about privacy. Some research has 
been conducted into the value users put on their privacy—that is, how much they might pay to protect their 
online information.
38
(Given that privacy issues are extensively discussed elsewhere, they are not the focus 
of this report.)
How should one think about the value of all this search activity? Most often, it is considered in terms of its 
value to the search industry—that is, enterprise search, classified and local search, and search marketing. 
Together, these three segments earned estimated revenue in 2010 of some $20billion in the United States 
and $40billion worldwide.
39
(See Box 3, “The money in the search industry.”) A very rough estimate of 
their profit margins
40
would indicate profits of about $8billion for US search companies. Divide this by the 
34  Anne Marie Perrault, An exploratory study of biology teachers’ online information-seeking practices, American 
Association of School Librarians, 2009.
35  Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2010.
36  International Telecommunication Union data on Internet usage, http://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/statistics/; 
population data from the World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog.
37  Moore’s Law states that the number of transistors that can be placed on an integrated circuit doubles 
approximately every twoyears. Metcalfe’s Law states that the value of a telecommunications network is 
proportional to the square of the number of connected nodes in the system.
38  McKinsey & Company for IAB Europe, Consumers driving the digital uptake: The economic value of online 
advertising-based services for consumers, September 2010.
39  McKinsey analysis based on MAGNAGLOBAL, Global ad spend by channel, including mobile, 2000–2016, 
December 2010. 
40  Typically, Internet search engines and classified search generate profit margins in the range of 20 to 
40percent, and SEO companies generate 10 to 20percent profit margins (based on McKinsey analysis of 
returns from public companies in 2008).
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
convert pdf to fillable form online; convert pdf to fill in form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; convert pdf fillable form
11
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
number of search queries in the United States that same year (about 270billion), and the profit per query is 
worth about three cents to these companies.
Yet this comes nowhere near to capturing a sense of the real worth of search if you consider even for a 
moment the very different ways in which individuals and organizations use search and why they value 
its utility. Much more value is created in the “search value chain” and captured by many more market 
participants. Hence the need for a more thorough assessment of the value of search, which this report aims 
to help meet.
Box 1. Search scope
Search is defined broadly. It includes any online search activity using general, horizontal Web search 
engines, such as Google and Yahoo!, and specialized, vertical ones, such as Amazon or YouTube. 
It also includes consumer searches and those conducted by people in businesses. It covers 
searches of all types of media, including text, images, and video, and through any type of device, 
including personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Currently, about a third of 
all searches are done at work, while the daily number of vertical searches conducted in the United 
States already exceeds the daily number of searches performed on any single, major, horizontal Web 
search engine such as Google or Bing.
1
Thus the need to define search broadly. However, we do not 
include in our estimates of search the impact of pure recommendations from other users or simple 
browsing (i.e., following links not generated by entering search terms) through a Web site.
Most analysis of the value of search has concentrated on the US market. This report includes four 
more countries—Brazil, France, Germany, and India—to give a view of how search might vary 
depending on geography and economic circumstances. The United States, Germany, and France 
can be considered leading-edge countries in terms of Internet accessibility and usage. India and 
Brazil are examples of up-and-coming economic powers where a relatively small segment of the 
population is currently active online. Adding search activity in Brazil, France, Germany, and India to 
that in the United States more than doubles the sample size of searches.
The report also includes mobile phone searches and those conducted on other mobile devices such 
as tablets.
Finally, we have assessed the value of search for a relatively large set of constituencies, including 
individuals and organizations, and examined a wide range of sources of value. Much previous 
research has focused on providers of search services, particularly advertisers. Yet our analysis 
suggests that search advertising accounts for less than 40percent of the total value derived from 
search.
The research was conducted in the first quarter of 2011.
 ComScore qSearch.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
convert word form to pdf fillable form; create fill pdf form
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
create fillable pdf form from word; create a fillable pdf form
12
Box 2. A history of search
Search had its conceptual beginnings in the 19th century, when pioneers such as Belgian Paul Otlet 
pondered how to collect and organize the world’s knowledge. In 1895, Otlet began a classification system 
using index cards, a system that was to become ubiquitous in libraries around the world. He hired a staff 
whose job was to read books, write the facts on the index cards, and cross-reference them. The filing 
cabinets in his warehouse were stuffed with more than 15million index cards before many were destroyed 
in World War II, but he had a grander vision still that presaged today’s search capabilities. He sketched 
out plans for a system in which people would be able to search throughmillions of interlinked documents 
and images from a great distance through what he envisaged as “electric telescopes.” He described 
how people would use the devices to send messages to one another, share files, and even contribute to 
social networks—able to “participate, applaud, give ovations, and sing in the chorus.” He called the whole 
thing a “réseau,” or network, whereby “anyone in his armchair would be able to contemplate the whole of 
creation.”
1
Fast forward to 1969 and ARPANET, the network sponsored by the US military’s Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency for computers to communicate with each other, and the core of what became 
the global Internet. Over time, the nodes on the network became thousands of large computers. And as 
other, similar data networks emerged around the world, and as they were hooked up to a much larger, 
collective Internet, it became increasingly difficult for people to find information.
The problem got worse when the Internet went mainstream with the development of the “World Wide Web” 
in the early 1990s. Before then, the Internet was mainly the province of scientists and researchers who did 
not regard it as a mass medium. It made the transition when a set of standards was created and a new class 
of easy-to-use applications called “Web browsers” was developed. These included the ability to easily 
display images as well as text and to follow links between pieces of content.
To cope with the subsequent proliferation of content, many hierarchical directories of information were 
developed, such as Yahoo!, which debuted in 1995, in which information was maintained and edited 
manually. Computer scientists soon began to develop automated ways to locate specific information on the 
Web—the needle in a haystack of hundreds of thousands of institutional computers, and tens ofmillions of 
smaller servers and personal computers that had become part of this fast-growing network. Search tools 
became a necessity for such an enormous network to be usable.
Most algorithmic search engines work more or less the same way: they employ software robots that 
“crawl” through the text of Web pages and index where particular words or groups of words show up. Many 
engines based on this technology, including WebCrawler, Lycos, AltaVista, and Excite, emerged in the 
mid-1990s, often combined with directories. In addition, online companies such as Amazon and eBay built 
internal product search algorithms that focused on their own universe of items, sellers, and customers.
Google’s search engine had its origins in 1996, as a graduate student project at Stanford University. What 
made it different from other Web-indexing engines was that it also analyzed how many other Web pages 
linked directly to a page that included the search terms. The idea behind this analysis, dubbed PageRank,
2
is that the more a page is linked to by other pages, the more relevant other users find it. Thus, search 
engines aggregate and leverage the collective votes of millions of web page creators each time they provide 
a link to a particular page as a source of information on a particular topic. Consequently, it ranks higher in 
the search results.
 Alex Wright, “The Web time forgot,” New York Times, June 17, 2008,  
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/17/health/17iht-17mund.13760031.html 
 Sergey Brin and Lawrence Page, The anatomy of a large-scale hypertextual Web search engine, Proceedings 
of the Seventh International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW), Brisbane, Australia, 1998, pp.107–117, 
http://dbpubs.stanford.edu:8090/pub/1998-8.
13
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Box 2. A history of search (continued)
The term “social search” began to emerge around 2004. Results from a social search give more visibility 
to content created or touched by other people, especially those in a user’s network, perhaps because 
it has been bookmarked or tagged, for example. This means it is likely to be more relevant to the user. 
Services such as del.icio.us and Reddit aggregate the “social bookmarks” from large numbers of people 
to suggest content. Users are increasingly navigating to Web sites from links on social networks, a role that 
search engines had traditionally dominated (see Exhibit5). Algorithmic search engines are now starting 
to incorporate social cues—for example, information about content that users have tagged—into their 
relevance-ranking algorithms. 
Exhibit5
8
12
26
31
22
37
13
40
69
10
9
21
24
19
29
20
33
65
14
8
19
22
22
28
33
34
66
Search 
engines
Links from 
friends via 
e-mail
Other1
Portal 
Web sites
Directly 
enter 
address
Your home 
page
Book-
marks/ 
favorites
Social 
networks
Search 
toolbars
SOURCE: McKinsey iConsumer surveys 2008–2010, US 13- to 64-year-old Internet users
Social networks increasingly playing navigation role
that search engines have traditionally dominated
1 Other includes widgets on personal home page, social bookmarking tools, RSS feeds, and other.
Which of the following features/Web sites do you use to get to the content 
that you read/browse online? (Select up to 3)
% of respondents
2010
2009
2008
-15
+20
-24
-27
14
Box 3. The money in the search industry
The search industry comprises three main segments: enterprise search, classified and local search, 
and search marketing. Together they earned revenue of $40billion worldwide in 2010.
Enterprise search
Companies that rely heavily on knowledge workers often invest in their own enterprise search 
capabilities to enhance the productivity and competitiveness of their staff. Others use third-party 
providers such as Endeca, Autonomy, Microsoft, and Exalead. In the United States, the third-party 
enterprise information management market was estimated to be worth $1.2billion by 2010.
1
The 
global third-party enterprise search market is estimated to be worth $2.8billion.
Classified and local search
This segment includes those that provide search capabilities for sites that classify content into 
particular categories, such as yellow and white page directories that have moved online, and 
recruiting and travel Web sites. Online searches have become by far the most common way of 
consulting directories, and online classified advertisements account for 80percent of total listings.
The online classified market was worth about $2.6billion in the United States in 2010,
2
in a global 
market worth approximately $8billion. The United States accounted for 65percent of revenue in this 
segment of the five countries analyzed.
Fixed-price placement of advertising in the classified database is still the largest source of revenue for 
participants in this segment, though it is losing ground to a model in which advertisers pay per click 
on their ad and/or bid for a certain key word. About 20percent of revenue originated from the latter 
revenue model in the United States in 2008.
3
By 2010, the proportion had reached 40percent.
Search marketing
This segment includes search engine providers that earn advertising revenue and companies that 
provide search engine optimization (SEO) services. It is by far the largest segment of the three, 
accounting for about 70percent of total revenue.
In most advanced Internet markets such as North America and the United Kingdom, almost 
80percent of companies market their products and services online.
4
They allocate a significant 
portion of their online marketing budget either to paid searches, in which they pay to have their sites 
appear in a prominent place on the search results page, or SEO, which helps them figure out which 
key words will get them higher on a search list after what is known as a “natural” key word search.
Revenue from key word search spending has been growing at 20percent a year globally,
5
to become 
the largest form of online advertising spending—close to 50percent in Europe.
6
The market for paid searches and SEO was estimated at $15billion in the United States and 
$30billion worldwide in 2010.
7
US revenue accounted for some 80percent of total revenue in this 
segment in the five countries analyzed.
 Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Economic trends in enterprise search solutions, European 
Commission Joint Research Center,  
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/jrc/index.cfm?id=1410&obj_id=10930&dt_code=NWS&lang=en.
 MAGNAGLOBAL, US media advertising revenue forecast, January 18, 2011; Screen Digest data on global 
online classifieds and directories advertising revenue by country.
 Borrell Associates.
 Econsultancy, UK search engine marketing benchmark report, June 2010,  
http://econsultancy.com/us/reports/uk-search-engine-marketing-benchmark-report.
 Global ad spend by channel, including mobile, 2000–2016, MAGNAGLOBAL, December 2010.
 Internet Advertising Board Europe, The online ad market continues to grow despite the recession,  
http://www.iabeurope.eu/news/europe%27s-online-ad-market-continues-to-grow-despite-the-
recession.aspx.
 Econsultancy in association with SEMPO, State of search engine marketing report 2010, 2010,  
http://www.sempo.org/resource/resmgr/Docs/State-of-Search-Engine-Marke.pdf.
15
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
How does an online search create value? Most research to date has looked at and quantified only three 
main sources of value: time saved by the searchers, money saved by consumers through greater price 
transparency, and the return on investment (ROI) for advertisers.
A few studies have been conducted on the first of these, time saved. One study
41
found that a successful 
search for academic information online took, on average, one-third of the time of a similar search in an 
academic library, though this did not account for the time it might take someone to travel to a library. Other 
studies describe how shoppers regard time saving as one of the major benefits of searching for products 
online.
42
More research has examined the impact of search on product prices because of the increased 
transparency it enables, and several studies have researched the value derived by advertisers for paid 
searches—that is, paying to have their Web sites appear prominently in search results—looking at the value 
derived from raised awareness as well as sales.
There are several additional ways in which search can create value, some of which can be measured in 
financial terms, and others that cannot. In all, we identified nine sources of search value that together start 
to reveal its true scale. Here we define each in turn and give examples that indicate the breadth of ways in 
which each creates value.
Nine sources of value
Better matching
Search helps customers, individuals, and organizations find information, products, and services that are 
relevant to their needs, and it helps those with something to offer locate the right audience or customers.
The value that search creates by pushing prices lower is considered separately.
Examples of value creation through better matching include:
ƒ In the United States, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline reported a 9percent increase in legitimate 
calls to its hotline after links were displayed in search results pages in response to searches that 
included key words such as emergency, suicide, or poison.
ƒ In a study of 1,275 consumers in four retail categories—clothing and footwear, beauty and skin care, 
DIY hardware, and kitchen and bathroom renovations—consumers who used the Internet to search for 
product information prior to making a purchase in a physical store spent more money than those who 
did not.
43
41  Yan Chen, Grace YoungJoo Jeon, and Yong-Mi Kim, A day without a search engine: An experimental study of 
online and offline search, working paper, School of Information, University of Michigan, 2010,  
http://yanchen.people.si.umich.edu/papers/VOS_20101115.pdf.
42  Andrew J. Rohm and Vanitha Swaminathan, “A typology of online shoppers based on shopping motivations,” 
Journal of Business Research, July 2004, Volume57, Number7, pp.748–757. See also Pradeep Chintagunta, 
Junhong Chu, and Javier Cebollada, Quantifying transaction costs in online/offline grocery channel choice, 
Chicago Booth School of Business research paper 09-08, 2009.
43  Sean Sands, Carla Ferraro, and Sandra Luxton, “Does the online channel pay? A comparison of online 
versus offline information search on physical store spend,” The International Review of Retail, Distribution and 
Consumer Research, 2010, Volume20, Number4, pp.397–410.
How search unlocks value
16
Time saved
Search can make it quicker to find information, which in turn can make it quicker to make decisions and 
shop. As a result, it boosts productivity. The following are examples that suggest just how much time 
search can save:
ƒ A typical Internet search for academic information takes seven minutes. Relying on physical references 
takes 22 minutes.
44
ƒ A consumer generally finds time to perform ten searches online but only two searches offline for each 
purchase.
45
ƒ It takes the same amount of time to do three searches in an online business directory as it does to do 
one in a physical directory.
46
Analysis for this report suggests that knowledge workers in business each save 30 to 45 hours per year as a 
result of search.
Raised awareness
Search helps raise the profile of any brand, product, or service, and paid search is recognized as one of the 
most effective forms of advertising. Large amounts of advertising spend are therefore being reallocated 
from other media into paid search.
The benefit of paid search to advertisers tends to be inversely proportional to the size of the advertiser, as 
it gives the smallest of entities the ability to raise awareness of their offerings to a worldwide audience—an 
otherwise difficult proposition. But paid search advertising is not the only way in which search can raise 
awareness. Organizations and individuals benefit from natural searches—that is, when their names pop up 
in search results simply because of what was typed in the search field. The majority of advertisers still find 
that more visits to their Web sites arrive via natural searches than paid ones.
47
Here are some additional facts and examples that illustrate the value search can create by raising 
awareness:
ƒ Search is one of the most powerful influencers when a consumer is considering which brand or product 
to purchase. For personal computers, search is the most commonly used source of information 
(34percent of times) during the active evaluation phase of the consumer purchasing decision process.
48
ƒ Search accounts for 25percent of the traffic of mainstream content creators.
49
ƒ An analysis of some 400 small and medium-sized businesses in France showed that those that invested 
in paid search advertising reported around twice as many cross-border sales as apercentage of total 
revenue as those that did not. Over a three-year period, these businesses also reported annual growth 
rates that were approximately one-and-a-half times as high as those that did not invest in search 
advertising.
50
44  Yan Chen, Grace YoungJoo Jeon, and Yong-Mi Kim, A day without a search engine: An experimental study of 
online and offline search, working paper, School of Information, University of Michigan, 2010,  
http://yanchen.people.si.umich.edu/papers/VOS_20101115.pdf.
45  McKinsey analysis of comScore data, eBay annual report.
46  Yan Chen, Grace YoungJoo Jeon, and Yong-Mi Kim, A day without a search engine: An experimental study of 
online and offline search, working paper, School of Information, University of Michigan, 2010,  
http://yanchen.people.si.umich.edu/papers/VOS_20101115.pdf. 
47  McKinsey US clickstream data, 2009.
48  McKinsey Customer Decision Journey Survey for Consumer Electronics, February 2009.
49  McKinsey US clickstream data, 2009.
50  McKinsey proprietary survey of French small and medium-sized businesses, 2010.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested