itextsharp how to create pdf with a table design and embed image in c# : Convert fillable pdf to html form control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser Value-of-search4-part1375

37
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Comparative returns on investment
Previous research referred to earlier in this report has looked at the value that search offers advertisers in 
terms of their return on investment.
As previously detailed, advertisers do well, earning an average ROI of 7:1 from search-related advertising. 
Others constituencies fare better still.
Based on the value of time saved alone, individuals in our study—that is, individual information seekers and 
content creators, consumers, and entrepreneurs—earn an ROI of 10:1, on average.
Enterprises earn still more, with an ROI of 17:1 as a result of time saved.
The methodology explains these calculations in detail.
Convert fillable pdf to html form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert fillable pdf to html form; pdf add signature field
Convert fillable pdf to html form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf fillable forms; auto fill pdf form from excel
38
Exactly how much value does search create? To date, no one has looked at its economic contribution at a 
country level, let alone a global level.
As described earlier, our research looked at nine sources of value for 11 constituencies in five countries. 
In some cases we were able to quantify the resulting value, and in others we were able to illustrate it only 
qualitatively. The methodology describes how we used this analysis to arrive at a global estimation of 
search value.
The analysis showed that search activity had measurable impact approaching gross annual value of 
$780billion in 2009. This is a necessarily conservative figure, given that the research was limited in terms 
of the number of constituencies and sources of value analyzed. It is a significant figure nevertheless, 
making each search worth $0.50 and equivalent overall to the GDP of the Netherlands or Turkey in 2010.
107
Moreover, the speed at which the search environment evolves guarantees that this figure has already been 
surpassed.
Exhibit24 shows how the value was divided among the five countries we studied.
107 International Monetary Fund.
Exhibit 24
Gross value created by search across countries, 2009
242
33
42
Measured value2
Additional value
not quantified1
Global
780
India
19
Brazil
17
France
Germany
United 
States
SOURCE: McKinsey analysis
1 These are only estimates and should not be taken out of context of the accompanying text.
2 These values are conservative. They include only quantified estimates and do not include value that we did not quantify, such 
as the improvement in the quality of a consumer’s shopping experience from better matching.
USD billions
ESTIMATES
The economic value of search
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET.
create a pdf form to fill out and save; convert pdf fillable form to html
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; convert pdf to fillable form online
39
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Not all this value shows up in GDP. While corporate benefits in the form of higher productivity are captured, 
many consumer benefits, such as lower prices and time saved, are not. Some of these are likely to have 
an indirect impact on GDP. In addition, some sources of value in education and health care that we 
did not quantify also boost GDP directly. The estimate of search’s impact on GDP should therefore be 
considered as conservative. It is nevertheless significant. The research showed gross value of $540billion, 
or 69percent of the measurable value, flowed through to GDP. This is roughly the size of the global print 
and publishing industry
108
or Switzerland’s GDP.
109
The methodology describes in detail how search’s 
contribution to GDP was estimated.
Exhibit25 shows how search’s contribution to GDP was spread across the five countries studied. Of the 
value created, around 70percent contributed directly to GDP in the developed countries studied and 
40percent in the developing countries. This represents between 1.2 and 0.5percent of each country’s 
GDP.
108 Includes publishing of books, brochures, musical books, newspapers, journals and periodicals, recorded 
media, and other publishing. Also includes printing, service activities related to printing, and reproduction of 
recorded media.
109 International Monetary Fund.
Exhibit 25
Value created by search across countries, 2009
Contribution to GDP1
%
1 Represents only the portion of value that is attributable to GDP (e.g., the 73% of $242 billion in the United States).
73
73
72
45
34
69
27
27
28
55
66
31
France
GDP
Beyond GDP
Germany
India
242
Brazil
17
United 
States
780
33
100% =
Global
19
42
Measured value
%; USD billions
SOURCE: McKinsey analysis
1.2%
0.9%
0.9%
0.5%
0.5%
ESTIMATES
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links Create fillable PDF document with fields.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert word form to fillable pdf; convert pdf forms to fillable
40
The large difference in the extent to which search contributes to GDP in developed and developing 
countries can be explained by the much largerpercentage of total value that is captured in developing 
countries as a consumer surplus, which is not included in GDP. That in turn is explained by developing 
countries’ much larger populations. This is reflected in Exhibit26, showing that in the developed countries 
studied, companies gain some 70percent of the measurable search value. In developing countries, the 
figure is around 40percent. The exhibit also indicates the extent to which search value is underestimated if 
one narrows the gauge to the search industry. It earns only 4percent of the value created.
Yet despite the clear benefits of search to the economy, it would be a mistake to think about search only in 
monetary terms. For example, search helps people find information in times of emergencies, and it helps 
them seek out people with similar interests—perhaps a support group for those coping with disease. And 
it shifts the balance to empower individuals or small organizations with something to share that would 
otherwise reach only a small audience. None of these benefits may have an easily quantifiable economic 
value, but each has a positive impact on people’s lives.
Exhibit 26
Value created by search across countries, 2009
Measured value
%; USD billions
SOURCE: McKinsey analysis
1 Search industry includes enterprise search, classified and local search, and search marketing.
2 SMBs = Small and medium-sized businesses.
NOTE: Numbers may not sum due to rounding.
27
27
28
55
66
100% =
Advertisers
Companies 
(including SMBs)2
Search 
industry1
Individuals
India
19
7
26
1
Brazil
17
26
15
3
France
33
42
27
4
Germany
42
41
28
4
United States
242
49
20
4
ESTIMATES
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
change font size in pdf fillable form; change font size in fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
convert word to pdf fillable form online; pdf fillable form
41
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
Search is at an early stage of its evolution. For example, searches for video or photographic images still 
largely depend on text searches by file names or key words, not image searches. Likewise, services that 
identify scraps of music have not yet found a killer application, and technologies capable of capturing a sign 
in one language and translating it into another remain rudimentary. All this is work in progress.
At the same time, voice recognition has improved dramatically and is already changing the search habits of 
many mobile users. In addition, search technology is now being grafted onto other consumer electronics 
devices, and cameras are being used as scanners to read bar codes and in turn consult databases to do 
on-the-spot price comparisons. Although the future of search remains hard to predict given the pace of 
change, it seems likely that its value will only grow as we rely on it more and more.
Search technology will need to develop to keep pace with what it has helped unleash, namely, a fast-
growing volume of online content: one study estimated that the amount of digital information will grow by 
a factor of 44 from 2009 to 2020.
110
Amid thetrillions of gigabytes, the task of search technology will be to 
make sure the search is still quick and the results relevant. With so much more information available, the 
danger is that we might reach a point where the value of the time it takes to find what we are searching for is 
higher than the utility of finding it. Conversely, the more powerful search becomes, the more value can be 
distilled from a mountain of data.
Accordingly, the use of vertical search engines is on the rise. As mentioned earlier, ten times as many 
product searches are now executed on Amazon and eBay, both vertical sites, as on Google Product 
Search.
111
And Exhibit27 shows that the number of horizontal Web searches conducted on personal 
computers in the United States is outstripped by vertical and mobile searches.
110 IDC Digital Universe Study, sponsored by EMC, May 2010.  
http://www.emc.com/about/news/press/2010/20100504-01.htm.
111 ComScore qSearch.
The future of search
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert pdf fillable form to word; convert word form to fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert word document to pdf fillable form; convert pdf fillable forms
42
Interest in semantic search engines, which try to understand the underlying intent of a search more 
accurately, is also on the rise. The increasing difficulty of finding relevant content is marked by a rise in the 
number of words in a search query: from 2.9 words in 2008, on average, to 3.2 in 2010.
112
Importantly, relevant search results are increasingly deemed to be personalized. Autonomous search 
agents that make suggestions based on personal data, including the user’s location, metadata, and more 
advanced algorithms, are in sight. For example, Surf Canyon, a US company, is developing real-time, 
personalized search capabilities that transform static lists of search results into dynamic pages that rerank 
results based on a user’s real-time, online activity.
The importance of personalized information is also reflected in the way key players in the search industry 
now use the data available on social networks to enhance search results. For example, users of the 
Facebook social network can tag content on the Web that they find interesting by pressing a “Like” button. 
When a user then conducts a search, pages “Liked” by their friends will help determine the ranking of the 
search results, on the assumption that this makes them more relevant.
The advent of smartphones, tablets, and other Web-connected portable devices increases the potential 
of more personalized searches. From 2008 to 2010, mobile search traffic in most markets grew fourfold.
113
Today, some 25percent of mobile users conduct searches on their wireless phones in the United States, as 
do slightly more than 30percent in Japan, even though many still do not use smartphones. It has also been 
shown that people tend to search for local services more on their mobile devices than on their PCs.
114
112 ComScore.
113 McKinsey analysis of data from Strategy Analytics, RBC Capital Markets, comScore, and Gartner press 
release, “Gartner says worldwide PC shipments on pace to grow 22percent in 2010,” May 26, 2010.
114 Jane Li, Scott B. Huffman, and Akihito Tokuda, Good abandonment in mobile and PC Internet search, 
Proceedings of the 32nd International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information 
Retrieval, July 19–23, 2009, Boston, MA.
Exhibit 27
Horizontal Web searches on traditional computers are now a minority of 
all searches performed in France
SOURCE: ComScore; McKinsey analysis
13
27
17
Horizontal Web search 
on computers
Web site–specific internal 
search on computers2
Searches on 
mobile devices
43
Vertical type-specific 
search on computers1
% of total searches performed in France, 2009
1 Searches for specific types of content, e.g., images, video, within maps.
2 Searches within a specific Web site, such as Amazon, YouTube, Wikipedia.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
attach file to pdf form; create fill in pdf forms
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
best pdf form filler; create fillable pdf form
43
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
As search continues to grow, new applications will undoubtedly emerge. Already, analysis of what people 
are searching for is being used not only to make search results more relevant but also to better understand 
current trends and future outcomes in society. Researchers have, for example, looked at how search 
activity can help predict epidemics, unemployment, consumer demand, or even stock prices. (See Box 4, 
“The predictive value of search.”)
So what does all this mean for those who participate in the search market?
Individuals have much to look forward to. Fueled by fierce competition among search providers, the power 
of search is set to keep rising. Individuals will be able to conduct their searches on a range of devices, 
anytime, anywhere. They will be able to search more quickly and more easily than before—with voice 
recognition, for example. And they can expect increasingly relevant results.
The downside to be considered is that just as search enables individuals to uncover more and more 
information, so it makes it easier for others to uncover information about them in what some may consider 
an invasion of privacy.
Organizations of every hue will benefit in similar ways and perhaps have even more to gain as they have 
sometimes been slower than consumers to capture some of the potential power of search. Cutting-edge 
IT innovation once mostly occurred within enterprises that enjoyed multimillion-dollar budgets to purchase 
servers, deploy networks, and implement large and complex software applications. Today, search 
innovation has been more prolific in consumer applications, and many would argue that search technology 
for consumers is superior to the search tools that employees in large corporations use to find information 
within the enterprise.
Participants in the search market—advertisers, portals, search engines, and those that provide search 
platforms—are in for a turbulent ride. The competition is fierce, and as technology change accelerates, 
incumbents will be constantly challenged and disruptive change will become the norm. The rise of social 
networks marks one current industry shift that raises question about the balance between pure logic-
driven, algorithmic searches and people-influenced, social searches. Fragmentation of the marketplace, by 
verticals, geographies (as some governments impose various types of regulatory controls), and the devices 
used for searching, will also make competing in the search market increasingly complex.
Policy makers will find themselves challenged as search gives rise to a whole host of issues that are difficult 
to arbitrate, given the ease with which information can be accessed through search. Privacy often grabs 
attention. Other salient issues include infringement—with many companies arguing that search engines 
should not index certain copyrighted or trademark-related words, images, text, or video—as well as 
censorship.
115
Some governments are condemned for using key-word-sniffing filters to snuff out dissident 
opinion; others are applauded for cracking down on, say, online gambling. Both could be argued to infringe 
on online freedom, making it one of the toughest issues confronting technology policy.
Moreover, any attempt by policy makers to arbitrate the interests of the different constituents in the fast-
paced virtual world will likely leave them playing catch-up. Public policy tends to change much more 
slowly than both IT and public opinion, and online activity often escapes the bounds of any institutional 
frameworks that policy makers might try to impose. Laws that prevent the reporting of matters sub judice, 
for example, are hard to enforce on the likes of Twitter or Facebook, and search ensures a ready audience.
Researchers, too, will be playing catch-up, trying to make sense of it all. But amid all the uncertainty, one 
thing is sure: the full implications of search on economies and societies are only now beginning to be 
revealed.
115 Hannibal Travis, “The future according to Google: Technology policy from the standpoint of America’s fastest-
growing technology company,” Yale Journal of Law & Technology, Spring 2008–09, Volume11.
44
Box 4: The predictive value of search
Economists have long recognized that the right information
1
can help anticipate economic trends. 
Today, much economic data is backward-looking, with unemployment data, for example, released 
several days after the end of the month. In contrast, key word searches, Tweets, or Facebook activity 
can be tracked in real time, lending valuable insights. For example, the volume of searches for, say, 
“automotives and shopping” in late February may help predict March sales way ahead of the March 
data.
2
In a fast-changing world, knowing what is happening in the present can prove to be a crucial 
tool for policy makers in formulating appropriate and timely responses.
3
Here are a few examples of how analysis of what people are searching for can help to better 
understand present trends and predict future outcomes.
ƒ Health care. In health care, research has shown that an analysis of search activity can give up to 
one to two weeks’ warning of a disease spreading before disease control authorities report on such 
problems.
4
ƒ Financial markets. Research has shown that the level of searches for stock tickers can predict 
abnormal stock returns and trading volumes.
5
Other research has looked at stock market 
movements in relation to the public mood as interpreted by the text content of daily Twitter feeds.
6
ƒ Real estate. Studies have shown that search activity can help predict housing prices and sales. 
One piece of research showed a strong correlation between home sales and the share of US 
Internet searches for “homes for sale.”
7
Another showed that errors in predicting future housing 
sales were cut by a factor of four when using search data compared with using other indexes.
8
ƒ Commercial success. Researchers examined whether search query volumes could predict 
the opening-weekend box-office revenue for feature films, the first-month sales of video games, 
and the rank of songs on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. In all cases, search counts were highly 
predictive.
9
ƒ Economic trends. German research, among other, has suggested strong correlations between 
key word searches and unemployment rates
10
as well as links between search data and the ability 
to better predict consumer confidence.
11
 George Stigler, “The economics of information,” Journal of Political Economy, June 1961, Volume 61, 
Number 3, pp. 213–225.
 See Hal R. Varian and Hyunyoung Choi, Predicting the present with Google trends, April 2, 2009, Google 
Research Blog,  
http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2009/04/predicting-present-with-google-trends.html.
 For further discussion, see Florian Bersier, Towards better policy and practice using real-time data, March 
12, 2010, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1614970.
 Jeremy Ginsberg, Matthew Mohebbi, Rajan Patel, Lynnette Brammer, Mark Smolinski, and Larry 
Brilliant, “Detecting influenza epidemics using search engine query data,” Nature, Volume 457, February 
19, 2009, pp. 1012–1014.
 Joseph Kissan, M. Babajide Wintoki, and Zelin Zhang, “Forecasting abnormal stock returns and trading 
volume using investor sentiment: Evidence from online search,” upcoming, International Journal of 
Forecasting.
 Johan Bollen, Huina Mao, and Xiao-Jun Zeng, “Twitter mood predicts the stock market,” Journal of 
Computational Science, March 2011, Volume 2, Number 1, pp. 1–8.
 Hopkins, Heather, “Internet searches match decline in existing home sales—revised,” Hitwise, April 25, 
2008, http://weblogs.hitwise.com/us-heather-hopkins/2008/04/internet_searches_match_declin_1.html.
 Lynn Wu and Erik Brynjolfsson, The future of prediction: How Google searches foreshadow housing prices 
and sales, ICIS 2009 Proceedings, 2009.
 Shared Goel, Jake M. Hofman, Sébastien Lahaie, David M. Pennock, and Duncan J. Watts, Predicting 
consumer behavior with Web search, Yahoo! Research, WWW 2010 Conference, April 26–30, 2010, 
Raleigh, NC.
10  Nikos Askitas and Klaus F. Zimmermann, Google econometrics and unemployment forecasting, German 
Council for Social and Economic Data, research notes, Number 41.
11  Torsten Schmidt and Simeon Vosen, A monthly consumption indicator for Germany based on Internet 
search query data, Ruhr Economic Paper Number 208, October 15, 2010.
45
The impact of Internet technologies: Search
The methodologies used to estimate the monetary value of search accrued by each of the constituencies 
have either been used elsewhere, reflect common sense, or are the best we could deploy given the 
available data. Where no data were available, or where the methodology was not robust, no attempt 
was made to quantify value. Hence, the estimates made in this report only partially reflect the overall 
value of search. Where it was not possible to quantify a particular source of value, we illustrate its impact 
qualitatively. We also illustrate the nonmonetary value of search.
Gross valuation estimates
The estimates reflect the gross value of search, and some of those benefits are not necessarily fully 
incremental—for example, about 20percent of online searches in the United States lead to retail sales, 
be they online or offline, but somepercentage of those purchases would have likely occurred even 
if consumers were not able to search online. Also, with regard to time saved, the fact that individual 
information seekers save time performing an individual search does not necessarily mean that they will 
reduce the overall amount of time they spend searching. They might simply conduct more searches in the 
same amount of time.
The following explains how search value was measured for each of the constituencies:
Advertisers
We quantified the value of search to advertisers
116
by estimating the ROI earned from paid search 
advertising (both online and mobile), SEO, and online classified advertising. We use a gross ROI of 9:1 
(revenue:cost) for paid search and SEO in the United States based on various academic papers. For 
example, the value of advertising clicks has been assessed as a ratio of between $2 and $2.5 to $1,
117
and advertisers receive an average of 5 to 5.3 clicks on their search results for every one click on their 
advertisements when both search and advertising links appear on a page.
118
ROI was then adjusted by 
country to account for different levels of online advertising effectiveness (measured as [(e-commerce + 
ROPO
119
)/(online advertising spend)]).
116 When calculating the value, we defined advertisers as organizations that use paid search advertising as well as 
those that benefit from natural search.
117 Hal R. Varian, “Online ad auctions,” American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 2009, Volume99, 
Number2, pp.430–434, http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.430; Ashish Agarwal, 
Kartik Hosanagar, and Michael D. Smith, “Location, location, location: An analysis of profitability of position in 
online advertising markets,” Journal of Marketing Research, forthcoming, http://ssrn.com/abstract=1151537; 
Misra, Sanjog, Edieal Pinker, and Alan Rimm-Kaufman, An empirical study of search engine advertising 
effectiveness, WISE 2006, Evanston, IL, December 9–10, 2006,  
http://digital.mit.edu/wise2006/papers/4A-2_PinkeretalWISE2006.pdf.
118 Bernard J. Jansen and Amanda Spink, “Investigating customer click through behaviour with integrated 
sponsored and nonsponsored results,” International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising, 2009, 
Volume5, Numbers1/2, pp.74–94.
119 Research Online-Purchase Offline, that is, the purchases made offline due to online research.
Appendix: Methodology
46
The ROI for online classified advertising was derived from a comScore/IAB study that estimates the ROI to 
be 10, of which 50percent is attributable to search.
120
Retailers
We quantified the value of search for retailers as the value of sales that occur because search was used 
at some stage in the decision-making process. This was calculated as the sum of e-commerce sales 
attributed to search plus ROPO. It was calculated by synthesizing the results of three sets of analyses: 
the ROI impact of search advertising and SEO expenditures in each country;
121
the touch points related 
to search at different points in the customer decision journey;
122
and the total number of searches and 
conversion rates.
123
Content creators
We quantified two sources of search value for content creators: revenue from search-related advertising 
and revenue from content sales.
Value from advertising was estimated as the revenue content creators receive as a result of the advertising 
impressions driven by search. We conservatively estimated that between 20 and 25percent of total online 
display advertising spend and other online advertising spend—for example, online video and rich media 
advertising—resulted from horizontal Web searches, and 5 to 7percent from internal searches.
Our estimate of revenue from content sales leverages the analysis for the retail constituency. Retail value 
for content creators was estimated as e-commerce sales for the product subcategory of books and music 
and video by country and the ROPO coefficient for that subcategory by country. We assumed that around 
30percent of that value goes to content creators and that the remainder goes to distributors.
We did not attempt to quantify any value for business-to-business content creators or content creators who 
sell on a subscription basis, although considerable value lies here.
Enterprise
As a gauge of search value to enterprise, we calculated the value of the productivity gains made by 
knowledge workers.
Several existing studies have demonstrated significant productivity gains from search in different 
geographies.
124
We assume a conservative 10 to 15percent gain in productivity for enterprise knowledge 
workers, and we assume that knowledge workers spend on average five hours per week, or about 
12percent of their time, searching online. We then took into account local wages and the number of 
knowledge workers per country to arrive at an estimate of the value of search in the five countries studied.
The ROI for enterprises was calculated based on an investment that took into account how much 
enterprises spent to deploy internal search capabilities and the amount they spent for Internet access that 
could be related to search. The return was based on the time saved as previously described.
125
120 ComScore/IAB, Classifieds ROI, 2006, paper presented at IAB Leadership Forum: Performance Marketing 
Optimization, Chicago, March 13, 2006, 
http://www.iab.net/media/file/resources_admin_downloads_IAB_comScoreExecPreso.ppt. 
Used the 10:1 found across all categories of the Verizon Superpages.
121 Hal R. Varian, “Online ad auctions,” American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 2009, Volume99, 
Number2, pp.430–34, http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.99.2.430. 
122 McKinsey primary research, Digital Marketing Survey, 2007.
123 ComScore, Nielsen.
124 Yan Chen, Grace YoungJoo Jeon, and Yong-Mi Kim, A day without a search engine: An experimental study of 
online and offline search, working paper, School of Information, University of Michigan, 2010,  
http://yanchen.people.si.umich.edu/papers/VOS_20101115.pdf; The hidden costs of information work, IDC 
white paper, March 2005; McKinsey proprietary survey of French small and medium-sized businesses, 2010.
125 Primary McKinsey & Company research.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested