ghostscript.net convert pdf to image c# : Create a writable pdf form SDK application API .net html wpf sharepoint viewse-um006_-en-e54-part1514

Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
541 
Chapter 19 
Setting up navigation 
This chapter describes: 
What a display hierarchy is. 
Setting up ways to move among displays in an application. 
Setting up keys to run FactoryTalk View commands. 
Creating and running client key components. 
Creating and using navigation buttons 
An important part of designing a complete operator interface is determining 
how operators will navigate through and interact with graphic displays in an 
application. 
To direct an operator through the main parts of an application, set up a 
hierarchy (or series) of graphic displays, that provides progressively more 
detail as the operator moves through different levels of information and data. 
The display hierarchy can represent parts of a plant or process, as well as 
different types of data displays. For example, the top level might represent an 
area in the plant, and the bottom level might contain trends and alarm 
displays specific to each area. 
Operators or supervisors with the necessary security permissions, might also 
be able to navigate between areas in the application, or gain access to 
displays that provide specific information, such as management summaries. 
When designing a display hierarchy, consider the needs of the various 
application users, including managers, supervisors, and operators. A 
hierarchy might include: 
An initial graphic display that serves as a menu. 
An overview of the plant, including links to displays located on 
FactoryTalk View SE Servers in areas around the plant. 
A comprehensive display of each process being monitored. 
Process-specific displays. 
Management summary displays. 
Trend displays of historical and real-time data. 
Alarm displays, for monitoring and responding to alarms. 
Designing a display 
hierarchy for an 
application 
Create a writable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create a pdf form to fill out; convert pdf to form fillable
Create a writable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
best pdf form filler; auto fill pdf form fields
Chapter 19                  Setting up navigation 
542 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
The following illustration shows a simple display hierarchy design for a 
network distributed application that contains two areas: 
Tip: For a live example of a display hierarchy that involves 
different navigation methods, run the FactoryTalk View 
SE InstantFizz application. To do this, open 
C:\Users\Public\Documents\RSView 
Enterprise\SE\Client and double-click a .cli file with 
appropriate resolution to run the application. 
FactoryTalk View gives you the tools for linking graphic displays and 
creating an overall application structure that is easy for an operator to use. 
You can create an application that is keyboard-based, touch screen-based, or 
combines both navigation methods. 
Although the methods look different to operators, they work similarly;  that 
is, both involve the use of FactoryTalk View commands. 
Using commands to open, close, and switch 
displays 
You can use the following FactoryTalk View commands to open, close, and 
switch between open displays at run time. 
Use the commands in macros, or as actions specified for touch zones, 
buttons, display keys, or object keys in a graphic display. 
Setting up ways to 
move among 
displays 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file.
pdf create fillable form; convert pdf to form fill
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
etc. Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create
create a writable pdf form; converting pdf to fillable form
Setting up navigation                  Chapter 19 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
543 
To do this 
Run this command 
Open the specified graphic display. 
If the specified display is already open and it allows multiple 
running copies (set up in the Display Settings dialog box), the 
Display command opens another copy of the display and makes it 
active. 
If the specified display is already open and it does not allow 
multiple running copies, the Display command makes the display 
active. 
A display of type: 
Replace opens on top of other open displays, and closes the 
the 
ones it overlaps. 
Overlay opens on top of any open displays, but does not close 
them. 
On Top opens on top of any open displays and remains in the 
foreground. 
Display 
Close the active or specified graphic display. 
Use the Abort command when you cannot use a display of type 
Replace to close other running displays. 
Abort 
Pull the specified graphic display in front of other open displays. 
If the specified display is of type Replace or Overlay, the 
PullForward command gives the display focus, and positions it 
behind any On Top display that is open. 
PullForward 
Push the specified graphic display behind other open displays. 
If the specified display is of type On Top, the PushBack command 
positions the display behind any other open On Top displays, but in 
front of any open Replace or Overlay displays. 
PushBack 
Tip: The PullForward and PushBack commands provide 
quick display changes because displays are already 
open. However, the more displays you have open, and 
the more complex the displays are, the more memory 
and CPU are used. 
Commands for opening, closing, and switching displays run only at the 
FactoryTalk View SE Client. Attempting to run these commands at a 
FactoryTalk View SE Server (for example, in a server startup macro) or in 
FactoryTalk View Studio, will result in errors. 
For more information about where commands run, see FactoryTalk View 
commands on page 649
Chapter 19                  Setting up navigation 
544 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
Example: Setting up navigation using keyboard operation 
The graphic display in this example is designed to act as a menu, by 
providing keys that an operator can press to open graphic displays 
representing different processes 
To create this display, the designer assigned various FactoryTalk View 
commands to keys using the three types of key definitions: object, display, 
and client. In all cases, keys (not mouse buttons) were defined to run 
commands. 
Object keys and display keys are set up in the Graphics editor. For more 
information, see Animating graphic objects. on page 513 
Client keys are created in the Client Keys editor. For more information, see 
Creating client keys on page 647
Setting up navigation                  Chapter 19 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
545 
Example 2: Setting up navigation using mouse and touch screen 
operation 
The graphic display in this example contains buttons that an operator can 
click using a mouse, or press on a touch screen, to open detail displays. This 
display acts as a menu and presents information. 
To create the buttons, the designer used the Button drawing tool in the 
Graphics editor. The buttons can be selected with a mouse or by pressing a 
touch screen. For information about creating buttons, see Creating the 
different types of push buttons on page 458
Choosing display types with navigation in mind 
When designing an application, the display types you choose give you 
additional control over how an operator can navigate from one display to 
another. 
For example, use the On Top option to keep a display on top at all times, 
even when another display has focus. 
If you want a display to replace any open displays that it covers or touches 
when it opens, use the Replace option. 
You select a type for a graphic display in the Display Settings dialog box. 
For more information, see Specifying the display type on page 432
Chapter 19                  Setting up navigation 
546 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
Tip: 
Displays that you want to run in a fixed position, for 
example, menus or banners, can be docked to the inside 
of the FactoryTalk View SE Client window. For more 
information, see Docking displays to the FactoryTalk 
View SE Client window on page 442. 
Reducing display call-up time 
To reduce the time required to open a graphic display, load it into the display 
cache. You can load the display: 
Before it is shown by using the Display command with the /Z  or /ZA  
parameter. For details, see the FactoryTalk View Site Edition Help. 
When it is shown for the first time by using the Cache After 
Displaying option in the Display Settings dialog box. For details, see 
Caching displays on page 434
You can associate FactoryTalk View commands with objects in a display, or 
with the entire display using object or display key animation. 
You can also associate commands with keys that are independent of objects 
or displays, and are available at all times throughout the system by creating 
client keys. For more information, see Creating client keys on page 647
Operators can use keys to interact with the system, for example, to change 
displays or set tag values. When deciding what type of key to create, use the 
following table as a guide: 
To do this 
Set up 
For details, see 
Associate a key with a specific graphic 
object (object key) 
Object key animation in the 
Graphics editor 
Setting up object keys on page 531. 
Associate a key with a specific graphic 
display (display key) 
Display key animation in the 
Graphics editor 
Setting up display keys on page 532. 
Create a key that works everywhere on 
an FactoryTalk View client (client key) 
A key definition component in the 
Client Keys editor 
Creating client keys on page 647. 
General rules governing precedence 
You can assign a single key to one or more of the three types of key 
definitions 
object, display, or client. 
Setting up keys to 
run FactoryTalk 
View commands 
Setting up navigation                  Chapter 19 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
547 
For example, you could assign the F2 key to open a valve when the valve 
object has input focus, close a popup display that has focus, and, as a client 
key, to open a graphic display containing a process overview. 
When a single key has more than one definition, the following rules of 
precedence apply: 
When a graphic display is active and an object has input focus, object 
keys have precedence over display keys and client keys. 
When a graphic display is active, display keys have precedence over 
client keys. 
For example, if you assign the F2 key as a display key in some graphic 
displays in an application, and you assign F2 as a client key in the 
same application, F2 will only work as a client key if the active display 
does not also use F2 as a display key. 
When designing an application, pay particular attention to the keys used by 
embedded objects. 
Object keys and display keys generally have precedence over keys used by 
embedded objects (for example, ActiveX, or OLE objects). 
However, keys used by OLE objects that are not part of FactoryTalk View 
(for example, an Excel worksheet), have precedence over object or display 
keys. For details, see the pages that follow. 
Precedence and the F1 key 
When you are developing an application in FactoryTalk View Studio, the F1 
key is reserved for opening context-sensitive Help. 
At run time, if a graphic display has focus and a press, release, or repeat 
action has been defined for the F1 key, F1 acts as a display, object, or client 
key instead of opening Help. 
Precedence and embedded ActiveX objects 
When a graphic display is active and an embedded ActiveX object has input 
focus, a key that triggers an action in the embedded object will not trigger 
that action, if the same key is also defined as an object or display key. 
Instead, when you press the key, the action associated with the object key or 
display key will be triggered. 
Say, for example, that an ActiveX slider object controls the speed of a motor 
by using the F2 key to increase the speed and the F3 key to decrease the 
Chapter 19                  Setting up navigation 
548 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
speed. If F2 is also defined as an object key to jog the motor’s position, 
pressing F
2 when the slider has input focus will always jog the motor’s 
position, instead of increasing the motor’s speed.
However, if a key that triggers an action in an embedded ActiveX object is 
also defined as a client key, pressing that key will trigger both the action 
defined for the embedded object and the action defined for the client key. 
For example, if the F2 key for an ActiveX gauge object increases a motor’s 
speed, and F2 is also defined as a client key to print the current graphic 
display, each time the 
operator presses F2, the motor’s speed will be 
increased, and the graphic display will be printed. 
Precedence and embedded OLE objects 
For embedded OLE objects, a key that triggers an action in the embedded 
object will trigger only that action, even if the key is also defined as an object 
or display key. In this case, the action defined for the object or display key 
will not be triggered at all. 
However, if a key that triggers an action in an embedded OLE object is also 
defined as a client key, pressing that key will trigger both the action defined 
for the embedded object and the action defined for the client key. 
Keyboard shortcuts 
The following keyboard shortcuts are normally reserved for use by Windows 
and FactoryTalk View SE. 
To do this 
Press this key 
Move focus to the object with the next highest index number. 
Tab 
Move focus to the object with the next lowest index number. 
Shift+Tab 
Move focus to the next object, in the direction the arrow key points. 
Ctrl+Up Arrow, 
Ctrl+Left Arrow, 
Ctrl+Down Arrow, 
Ctrl+Right Arrow 
Move focus to the next window. 
Ctrl+F6 
Move focus to the previous window. 
Ctrl+Shift+F6 
Close the active window. 
Ctrl+F4 or 
Ctrl+Shift+F4 
Perform the press and release actions for the button object that has focus. 
Download the value in the input object that has focus. 
Open the Recipe dialog box when a recipe object has focus. If Ctrl+W was 
pressed previously, the recipe is saved. If Ctrl+R was pressed previously, the 
recipe is restored. 
Open the on-screen keyboard, if the input or recipe object with focus is set up 
to display the keyboard. 
Enter 
Setting up navigation                  Chapter 19 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
549 
Upload data into all input objects in the display. 
PgUp 
Upload data into the input object that has focus. 
Ctrl+PgUp 
Download data from all input objects in the display. 
PgDn 
Download data from the input object that has focus. 
Ctrl+PgDn 
Delete the contents of the input object. 
Home+Shift+End+Del 
Move input focus to the recipe object, and prepare for a recipe restore. 
Ctrl+R 
Move input focus to the recipe object, and prepare for a recipe save. 
Ctrl+W 
Open the Recipe dialog box. 
If Ctrl+W was pressed previously, the recipe is saved. If Ctrl+R was pressed 
previously, the recipe is restored. 
+ on the numeric keypad 
Move the selection bar on the Object Key menu. 
Up ArrowDown Arrow 
Close the Object Key menu, or exit input mode for the updating input object that 
has focus. 
Esc 
Move the cursor one position left or right. 
Left ArrowRight Arrow 
Delete the character to the left of the cursor. 
Backspace 
Delete the character to the right of the cursor. 
Del 
Delete all characters from the cursor position to the end of the line. 
Shift+End+Del 
Copy the selected items to the clipboard. 
Ctrl+C or Ctrl+Ins 
Cut the selected items and place them in the clipboard. 
Ctrl+X, or Shift+Del 
Paste the contents of the clipboard at the current cursor position. 
Ctrl+V, or Shift+Ins 
Position the cursor at the beginning of the data entry object. 
Home 
Tip: The arrow keys perform different actions when a trend 
graphic object has focus. For details, see Using the 
arrow keys on page 627. 
Precedence and reserved keys 
If you assign a reserved key to an object or display key, the object or display 
key function takes precedence, and the default, reserved function of that key 
is disabled. 
However, if you use a reserved key or key combination as a client key, the 
key will perform both the actions of the client key and the action of the 
reserved key. For that reason, using reserved keys to define client keys is not 
recommended. 
For more information about client keys, see Creating client keys on page 
647
You can create up to three types of navigation buttons: 
Button type 
Button function 
DisplayPreviousScreen 
Opens the previous graphic display in the navigation history when the button is clicked. 
About navigation 
buttons 
Chapter 19                  Setting up navigation 
550 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
DisplayNextScreen 
Opens the next graphic display in the navigation history when the button is clicked. 
DisplayNavigationHistory 
Opens a list of previously opened displays when the button is clicked. From the list, you 
can select a display to view it. 
You can use the navigation button object to create buttons to navigate 
between previously viewed graphic displays. FactoryTalk View SE can 
maintain a navigation history of displays that are viewed, and the navigation 
buttons let you browse back to a previous display and forward to the next. 
Each navigation button performs a single function at runtime, with the option 
to display the previous screen, the next screen, or the navigation history. 
Multiple navigation buttons can be added in a group to mimic the 
functionality of navigation buttons in a web browser, letting you move back, 
move forward, and view history. 
Navigation history is optional, and is configured for each client. To track 
displays, you have to do the following: 
Activate the display navigation functionality using the FactoryTalk 
View SE Client. 
Specify what displays to track using the Properties tab in the Display 
Settings for each display. 
This provides flexibility in tracking only the displays you specify. 
For additional details, click on Help in the FactoryTalk View SE Client 
wizard. See also Setting up the properties of a graphic display on page 431
How navigation buttons work 
When the button is active, clicking it starts the corresponding action that is 
set on the Navigation Button Properties dialog box. If the button is 
inactive, clicking it causes no response. 
Whether the button is active or inactive depends both on the configured 
action of the button and the position of the current opened graphic display in 
the navigation history list. For example, if the button is configured to show 
the next graphic display and the current shown graphic display is the first one 
in the navigation history list, the button is inactive. When the current shown 
graphic display is not the first one in the navigation history list, the button is 
active. 
Creating a navigation button 
1.  In the Graphics editor, select Objects > Push Button > Navigation, 
or click the navigation button icon in the Objects toolbox. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested