ghostscript.net convert pdf to image c# : Convert word to pdf fillable form Library control class asp.net azure wpf ajax Web_Access_Workbook2-part161

A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Tables 
Your best bet for checking if your table is accessible to the screen readers that people with no or 
low vision use to read text aloud is to read it like a screen reader would, as shown in Table 1 
below. 
Screen 
readers 
read 
Information 
across  
tables 
in a 
linear 
way 
Thereby 
making 
It 
Difficult 
to 
understand 
Information 
contained 
in tables. 
Table 1: How a screen reader reads data in a table
4
Overarching guidelines for creating more accessible tables include: 
Define column and row size using percentages, not fixed measurements. This allows 
enlargement without distortion.  
Use the simplest layout possible. Do not use more than one heading per row or 
column (i.e., no subheadings). Do not span rows or columns. See Table 1 below for 
an example of spanned rows, and the more accessible solutions to presenting the same 
information in  Table 3 and Table 4 below. 
Dept. 
Code 
Class 
# 
Section 
Max 
Enrollment
Current 
Enrollment
Rm. #
Days 
Start 
Time 
End 
Time 
Inst. 
100  1 
15 
13 
Mon,Wed,Fri 10:00 11:00 Magde 
100  2 
15 
Tue,Thu 
11:00 12:30 Indge 
205  1 
15 
Tue,Thu 
09:00 10:30 Magde 
BIO
315  1 
12 
Mon,Wed,Fri 13:00 14:00 Indge 
150  1 
15 
15 
13 
Mon,Wed,Fri 09:00 10:00 Roberts
BUS
210  1 
10 
13 
Mon,Wed,Fri 08:00 09:00 Rasid 
Table 2: Example of table with spanned row headings, BIO and BUS
5
4
Thanks to Cornell’s Sharon Trerise for this table and for 
Table 5
5
These table examples are from www.webaim.org/techniques/tables/data.php 
18 
Convert word to pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf to form fill; add fillable fields to pdf online
Convert word to pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf form to fill out; allow users to attach to pdf form
Dept. Code  Class #  Section 
BIO  
100 
BIO  
100 
BIO  
205 
BIO  
315 
BUS  
150 
BUS
210 
Table 3: Possible solution to Table 1   
Table 4: Another possible solution to Table 1 
Dept. Code/ Class #  Section 
BIO 100 
BIO 100 
BIO 205 
BIO 315 
BUS 150 
BUS 210 
If your table layout must be too complex for a screen reader to access, then provide a text 
explanation that summarizes the information in the table. In some cases, such as providing a 
class schedule, you’ll also need to provide contact information so that blind users can get the 
information they need.  
If you are creating tables in HTML, please refer to page 44 for an additional introduction to 
creating accessible online tables.  
Resources on tables 
You’ll find a good introduction, including to HTML tables, at 
www.webaim.org/techniques/tables
Image Use and Alternative text (alt-text) 
Images can be a great way to increase usability and understanding by most web users, with or 
without disabilities. They are particularly helpful to many with cognitive difficulties, such as 
reading disorders. A picture can be worth a thousand words. Unless, of course, you are blind. In 
which case you will need some words to help you understand the content.  
The main way of doing this is to prove alternative text, or alt text, that screen readers will read 
aloud for users with low or no vision. Most common office applications (e.g., Word), as well as 
HTML, let you add this descriptive text. More technical details for how to do this in several 
applications is discussed later. But whatever media format you are creating, some general 
guidelines on providing images and good alt text include: 
Eliminate or minimize graphical (vs. real) text. Graphical text distorts when enlarged, 
and is inaccessible to screen readers (see Figure 1, below). 
Communicate the purpose of the graphic accurately and succinctly in the alt text. 
In HTML, provide empty or null alt text for graphics which do not convey content 
(i.e., use alt=“”; see the HTML section on page 41). In other media formats, don’t 
bother describing images that are merely decorative. 
In image maps, provide alt text for both the main image and the hot spots. 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
19
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
change pdf to fillable form; change font size in pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
attach image to pdf form; change font size pdf fillable form
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Do not repeat the alt text of an image in the adjacent text. You need one or the other. 
Do not put important images in the background. 
versus         
University
Figure 1: Enlarged graphical text (distorted) vs. enlarged real text (not distorted). 
(Image from WebAIM)
Most applications let you add alternative text to describe images, whether they are pictures, 
graphs or other objects. In Word and PowerPoint, right click on the image or object, choose 
“format picture” or “format object” from the menu, and then enter your alt text in the “Web” tab 
(see Figure 3
in the section on adding alt text in Word on page 27). For images on HTML pages, 
see the section about alt text and other options in the HTML chapter (see page 41). 
Resources on images and alt text 
WebAIM provides a great introduction to image accessibility at 
www.webaim.org/techniques/images/
, which includes useful examples of good alt text for the 
same images in different contexts. For additional succinct yet thorough guidelines on writing 
good alt text, turn to the article “Writing good ALT text” at 
www.gawds.org/show.php?contentid=28
Forms
Everyone benefits from a well-organized, highly usable form, whether for filling out 
a survey or registering for a class. Most of the work to create forms accessible to 
people with disabilities will benefit everyone. Many accessibility strategies are 
specific to the media type being used, e.g., HTML or PDF, but overall good 
techniques include: 
Users must be able to complete the form using only the keyboard. (Within web-based 
forms, this means no JavaScripts that change browser location.)  
Organize forms logically. This includes providing clear instructions, labeling what is 
required, and lining up each label (e.g., Gender) with the element being asked (e.g., 
radio buttons for Male and Female). In HTML, it also means being cautious about 
using table layouts, ensuring screen readers will read things in the right order 
(covered later).  
Experience what a poorly organized form sounds like to someone using a 
screen reader, and explore the more accessible alternatives, at: 
www.webaim.org/techniques/forms/screen_reader.php
20 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; fillable pdf forms
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
acrobat fill in pdf forms; pdf fillable form creator
Audio and Video Media 
The two guidelines for audio media are: 
Provide a text transcript for all audio media. 
If the audio is associated with images or video, also provide text 
captions that are synchronized with the visuals. 
Transcripts 
Transcripts are text versions of any audio you use on your web site, whether in a web page or 
embedded in a downloadable file (e.g., a Word Document). They allow anyone that cannot 
access content from web audio or video to read a text transcript instead, which is useful not just 
to people with hearing disabilities. For example, transcripts help those who would like to print 
out the content for later study, or who are working in a setting where audio would be 
inappropriate. It makes the content searchable. Also, people can often read transcripts faster than 
they can listen to the audio. In particular, screen reader users often set the readers to read at a rate 
much faster than most humans speak (and faster than most people without screen reader 
experience could understand). 
Transcripts do not have to be verbatim accounts of the spoken word, and can contain additional 
descriptions, explanations, or comments that may be beneficial.  
For most web video, both captions and a text transcript should be provided. For content that is 
audio only, a transcript will usually suffice. 
Captions 
When your audio is associated with any visuals, such as images, slides, or video, you should 
provide captions as well as a text transcript. Captions should be: 
Synchronized – the text content should appear at approximately the same time that 
audio would be available. 
Equivalent – content provided in captions should be equivalent to that spoken. 
Accessible – caption content should be readily accessible and available. 
Resources on providing transcripts and captions   
Most of the above is drawn from WebAIM’s article on captions at 
www.webaim.org/techniques/captions
. It provides details on captioning options and technologies 
that can help you create synchronized, accessible captions.  
See also the checklists on video use at www.catea.org/grade/guides/videomust.php
.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
21
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Export PDF from OpenOffice Spreadsheet data. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.Word.dll.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; converting pdf to fillable form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual An excellent .NET control support convert PDF to multiple Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from
pdf create fillable form; create a fillable pdf form online
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Text Presentation and Formatting
Some basic guidelines for making your text content more readable, for everyone, include: 
Use footnotes rather than endnotes, to help keep them in context.  
Simple, familiar fonts are best (e.g., choose times new roman over “baskerville old 
face” or any cursive fonts).  
High contrast between text and background is crucial, and helps all users. For 
example, black on white and dark blue on yellow provide high contrast. Orange on 
yellow or green on red are low contrast, and hard for even people with excellent 
vision to read.  
Create large, empty margins around the text. 
Use blank lines between paragraphs. 
Writing Style
No matter who your users are, or what media you’re using, writing clearly and simply will make 
your content more understandable, accessible and enjoyable for everyone. Guidelines include: 
Use active verbs, avoid passive voice (e.g. “Professor Rajan’s lab team invented the 
device”, not, “The device was invented…”). 
Avoid the verb “to be” as your main verb (e.g., “She probably will win,” not, “She is 
probably going to be the winner”). 
Keep sentences short and simple. Avoid double negatives.  
Organize your ideas logically. 
For more tips on clear writing, and in particular writing for people with cognitive disabilities and 
reading disorders, visit www.webaim.org/techniques/writing
.  
Timed Responses
Occasionally you might require a timed response, such as on an online test or quiz, or when a 
secure page login might expire. If so, alert the user so that he or she has plenty of time to respond 
before losing his or her place.  
22 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
create pdf fill in form; convert excel to fillable pdf form
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
convert word to pdf fillable form online; convert html form to pdf fillable form
III. 
Creating Downloadable Files 
This section explains core techniques for making the files you create for users to download 
accessible to more people. It covers the following file types: Word and rich text, PDFs, Excel, 
and PowerPoint. It is designed to help you: 
Describe key elements required to make each of these file types accessible. 
Easily find references to support you when making these kinds of files accessible. 
Create accessible files of each type, in some cases by following instructions provided 
here and in others via links to step-by-step guides and tutorials to follow when you 
are back at your desk.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
23
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields.
create pdf fill in form; convert word document to fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; using RasterEdge.XDoc.Excel; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint; How to VB.NET: Convert ODT to PDF.
create fillable pdf form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Creating Accessible Word Documents 
You probably use Word, rich text files or another word processing program every 
working day. Since Word is the most common, that is the focus here, though much of 
the advice transfers to other programs.  
The advice here will not only help you make your documents more accessible to people with 
disabilities, but make more effective and efficient use of some Word features more generally. 
Much of the key to improved accessibility is to provide structure.  
Use Real Headings
When you want to make a heading in one of your documents, like the “Use Real Headings” one 
directly above, how do you do it? If you simply make the text bold and increase its font size, you 
are missing out on one of Word’s most useful features – heading styles.  
For screen readers to be able to differentiate headings, you must use these styles. They have 
many other advantages too. For example, if you use real headings, you can create a table of 
contents in an instant
6
or change the format of all the headings in the document at once
7
.  
How to Use Existing Heading Styles in Word 
1.  Highlight the text you want to make into a heading (see Figure 2). 
2.  Find the Styles list in the toolbar. 
3.  Choose one of the Heading styles in that list (Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3, etc.) 
Figure 2: Applying an existing heading style, ‘Heading 4,” in Word  
Use the headings in logical order, i.e., use Heading 1 for your document title (there should only 
be one Heading 1 in your document), Heading 2 to start each main section, and Headings 3 and 
6
In the Word menu, follow this path: Insert > Reference > Index and Tables > Table of Contents 
7
Format > Styles and Formatting > right click on heading style and choose “Modify” > make format changes > 
select “add to template.” This is also how to modify the heading styles in Word from the existing ones.  
24 
lower for subsections under each Heading 2. Don’t use heading styles for anything other than 
indicating your document sections. (If you want to change Word’s built-in heading styles, refer 
to Word help documentation and to the footnote in the introduction to this Word section.) 
Breaking down your document into short sections under headings can also make the content 
more readable for all users, and especially those with cognitive disabilities. 
Try creating your own real headings. Open Word and create a new 
document. Either type or copy and paste 6 lines of text into the document, 
with hard returns after each (i.e., hit enter). Gibberish or random words are 
OK.  
Now, make the first line into the built-in Heading 1 style. Make the third 
line Heading 2 style. And make the fifth line Heading 3 style.  
Make Real Lists
As with headers, when you make bulleted or numbered lists, use Word’s built-in style features to 
create them. This makes it easier for you, and possible for screen readers to identify the lists.  
Ways of Making Real Lists 
Start by highlighting the text you want to make into a bulleted or numbered list. Then either: 
Click the bullet or number icon in your toolbar.                   
Bullet toolbar icon in Word
In the Word menu, follow this path: Format > Bullets and Numbering > select the 
Bulleted, Numbered, or Outlined Numbered tab as appropriate. 
Choose a bulleted or numbered style from Word’s built-in styles, in the same way as 
you select a heading style described in the previous section.  
Improve Tables
Even the best structured table in Word can be challenging for a screen reader to make sense of. 
However, particularly in academics, tables still often provide the clearest way of presenting 
information. If you do need to use tables, it is better to create them in HTML than in Word. 
(Refer to the HTML table formatting section on page 44). 
When you do create tables in Word, simplify them, define column widths with percentages (not, 
e.g., inches) and create clear row and column labels. 
Simplify 
Simplify your tables as much as possible. For example, because screen readers have trouble 
making sense of them, avoid using more than one heading for rows or columns (i.e., don’t use 
subheadings), and don’t use headings that span more than one row or column. Also, complex 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
25
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
layouts can be confusing for all users, and particularly for people with some kinds of cognitive 
difficulties.  
Define Column Widths with Percentages 
If you are creating a table to represent data, define column widths with percentages, rather than 
fixed numbers. This lets a user with low vision increase the table size without losing the 
proportions.  
Put your cursor in the table, and then in the Word menu, follow this path: Table > Table 
Properties > select the Columns tab > select “Percent” from the “Measure in:” menu. 
Create Clear Row and Column Labels 
While you cannot make row and column labels accessible for screen readers in Word, by setting 
them off with bold and larger font formats you can make them more readable for everyone who 
has sight, including people with low vision. (Note: do not use real Word heading styles for 
tables, this will confuse the structure of your document). 
Describe Images 
No matter what medium you are using – e.g., Word, PowerPoint, or HTML – you should provide 
text descriptions of any image you include if it is providing more than background decoration. 
This is descriptive text is called alt text, short for “alternative text”.  
In short, imagine what would be most useful to you if you couldn’t see the page. When the 
screen reader comes across this alt-text, it will say “Image” and then read aloud whatever alt text 
you provide. Shorter is usually better, but if the image is central to the content, e.g., a painting 
shown on an arts course site, then you should probably lean towards being more descriptive.  
Refer back to the earlier section on drafting good alt text generally on page 19. 
How to Insert Alt-Text  
1.  Highlight the image. 
2.  Right click and select “Format Picture.” 
3.  Select the “Web” tab and enter your alternative text (see Figure 3).  
26 
Figure 3: Adding Alt Text to an Image in Word 
Resources on Word
As always, WebAIM offers great tips on making Word documents accessible, including some 
information on converting to HTML, at www.webaim.org/techniques/word
.   
If you like checklists, you’ll like the “musts”, “shoulds” and “mays” of accessible Word use at 
www.catea.org/grade/guides/wordmust.php
.   
The free online Access E-Learning course, at www.accesselearning.net
, has an entire tutorial 
with detailed instructions and practice labs on this topic.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
27
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested