c# magick.net pdf to image : Create a fillable pdf form SDK application project wpf html web page UWP Web_Access_Workbook5-part164

A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
vs.    
Figure 10: A WebAIM webpage. The first image shows it with the WebAIM CSS style sheet applied. The 
second shows the page with styles removed. 
Note that even when using CSS, the content and structure you provide with HTML needs to 
follow the same guidelines as when you aren’t using CSS.  
Also, don’t make your pages dependent on CSS – it is only for presentation and appearance. If 
you try to use it to control page structure, your pages will become less accessible. 
Resources on CSS
See WebAIM’s introduction to style sheets at www.webaim.org/techniques/css
, including a 
section on using CSS to improve accessibility with content that is invisible to users who don’t 
need it.  The Access E-learning tutorial includes some tips on CSS within their HTML course 
module at www.accesselearning.net
.  The article at www.mcu.org.uk/articles/tables.html
discusses the virtues of CSS vs. tables for layout.  
W3schools offers CSS tutorials, 70 examples, and a CSS reference listing at 
www.w3schools.com/css
. Also, Cornell’s CIT offers face-to-face training sessions on Getting 
Started with CSS. Visit the technical training schedule available at www.cit.cornell.edu/training
to see when the next workshop is.  
48 
Create a fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf fill form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Create a fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
change pdf to fillable form; convert pdf fillable form to word
JavaScripts 
Of the scripting languages, JavaScript may be the most popular. Web designers often embed 
JavaScripts into their HTML pages to get web pages to do things HTML alone cannot do. For 
example, designers use it to create pop-up windows, check that all required fields in a form have 
been filled in, or display changes when you put your mouse over an image.  
JavaScript Accessibility Issues
14
JavaScript allows developers to add increased interaction, information processing, and control in 
web-based content. It can even be used to increase accessibility, such as by providing warnings 
on pages that require a user response or will otherwise time out. However, JavaScript can also 
introduce accessibility issues. These issues include: 
Navigation – barriers to navigating using a keyboard or assistive technology. 
Hidden content – content or functionality not accessible to assistive technologies. 
User control – lack of user control over automated content changes. 
Confusion/Disorientation – altering or disabling the normal functionality of the user 
agent (browser) or triggering events that the user may not be aware of. 
Accessible approaches and solutions are: 
When using event handlers, use only those that are device independent (e.g., do not 
require the use of the mouse only). 
Content and functionality that is provided through scripting must be made accessible 
to assistive technologies. 
Web pages that use scripting must be fully navigable using a keyboard. 
JavaScript should not modify or override normal browser functionality in a way that 
may cause confusion. 
When JavaScript cannot be made natively accessible, an accessible alternative must 
be provided, such as with the NOSCRIPT element. 
Resources on JavaScript
How to implement each of the approaches and solutions listed above is covered at 
www.webaim.org/techniques/javascript/
. WebAIM also includes a piece on accessible AJAX, 
www.webaim.org/techniques/ajax/
. Additional information on accessibility and AJAX is located 
at www.washington.edu/computing/accessible/accessibleweb/ajax_accessible.html
. You will 
find a thorough 3-hour self-guided tutorial about accessible scripting, including JavaScripts, as 
the last module in the free online Access E-Learning course at www.accesselearning.net
.  
14
This section comes directly and indirectly from www.webaim.org/techniques/javascript
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
49
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; change font size in fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Plug-ins 
Plug-ins are computer programs that interact with a host application, e.g., a web browser, to 
accomplish a task that the host cannot do on its own. Plug-ins might be used to read particular 
kinds of files (e.g. using QuickTime to show a video), or play and watch presentations in 
browser (e.g., watching a Flash presentation). 
Three things for web developers or designers to keep in mind about plug-ins are: 
The plug-in itself must be accessible, i.e., it should work well with assistive 
technologies. Check with the company that makes the plug-in, or refer to some of the 
resources below. 
The content that the plug-in presents needs to be accessible, i.e., it should follow all 
the other guidelines covered here. For example, most images need alternative text, 
text should be high contrast, all audio requires transcripts, and all video requires 
timed captions.  
Don’t make your important site content or functionality dependent on plug-ins. For 
example, do not use Flash-only navigation.  
Making plug-ins more accessible 
Several things you can do to make plug-ins generally more accessible include:  
Link to the site where the relevant plug-in can be downloaded.  
When embedding plug-in content and nesting OBJECT and EMBED tags, put the 
OBJECT tag at the outermost level for Internet Explorer and next the EMBED tag for 
Netscape browsers.
15
Resources on Plug-ins 
WebAIM compares media players (RealMedia Player, RealOne, Quicktime, and Windows 
Media Player) in this article: www.webaim.org/techniques/captions/mediaplayers. They 
recommend using players as standalone, rather than embedding them, to make them accessible. 
WebAIM also hosts an article about using Flash accessibly, www.webaim.org/techniques/flash/
The “Flash and Accessibility” article at www.usability.com.au/resources/flash.cfm provides a bit 
more detail, and you’ll find checklists at www.catea.org/grade/guides/flashmust.php. Adobe’s 
Flash Accessibility information is at www.adobe.com/accessibility/products/flash.  
15
Much of the content in this plugin section is adapted from the Plugin section of the HTML self-training module at 
www.accesselearning.net. That section includes sample HTML for this embedding.  
50 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; create fillable form pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert pdf fillable form; convert pdf fillable form to html
VI. 
CommonSpot and BlackBoard 
Many in the Cornell community use CommonSpot to manage their site content and BlackBoard 
for course pages. This section covers how to make sites that you maintain with these tools more 
accessible. 
CommonSpot 
CommonSpot is a content management system (CMS) for developing and maintaining web 
pages, produced by the company PaperThin. Many Cornell units have adopted CommonSpot as 
their CMS.  
You can make your CommonSpot-generated sites more accessible by: 
Turning on the two accessibility options in the author mode. One prompts you to add 
alt-text for every image, and the other helps you set up accessible tables. 
Make sure any downloadable files (e.g., PDFs) you upload are accessible (see the 
section about this that starts on page 5)  
While you can make accessible websites using CommonSpot, currently the authoring mode in 
CommonSpot is not accessible. Cornell is working with the vendor, PaperThin, to improve this.  
Requiring Alt-text in CommonSpot  
To require that your website content editors must provide alternative text to every image added 
to your CommonSpot site, do the following: 
1.  Log in as a CommonSpot administrator at 
http://author.yoursite.cornell.edu/admin.cfm.  
2.  Click the “[your website] Site Admin” option 
in the top menu navigation. 
3.  Open the “Accessibility” settings and launch 
the Accessibility Properties popup. 
4.  Check the “Require the Alt attribute on 
images and objects” box Figure 11. 
Figure 11: CommonSpot Accessibility 
Properties pop-up 
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
51
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
convert pdf to form fill; create fill pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert word form to fillable pdf; adding a signature to a pdf form
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Tables in CommonSpot  
When adding a table in CommonSpot, add a brief 
“Description (Summary)” (see Figure 12).  The 
summary is simply a short description of the 
table. For example, for a calendar, the summary 
can be as simple as “Monthly calendar with links 
to each day's posts.”  
Figure 12: CommonSpot Table Properties Menu 
If you use tables for layout, you should give each 
of those tables an empty summary, to indicate that 
the table is used exclusively for visual layout and 
not for presenting tabular data.  
To add Headers (<th></th>) to Tables: 
1.  Use Internet Explorer 6. Currently only IE6 allows the addition of headers to tables in 
CommonSpot. 
2.  Add table with appropiate table columns 
and rows, with the table summary. 
Figure 13: CommonSpot Row Properties Box 
3.  Right click on the top row and select 
“New Row Properties.” 
4.  In the “New Row Properties” dialogue 
check the “Header Row” box (see Figure 
13). 
5.  Add text into table header cells. 
BlackBoard 
Currently, Cornell has a license for using BlackBoard for managing online course content. 
However, BlackBoard is not as accessible as it could be, and other options are under review. In 
the meantime, the most important things you can do are to: 
If you are using BlackBoard, make sure any downloadable files (e.g., PDFs) you 
upload are accessible (see the section about this that starts on page 5).  
Evaluate the needs of your students. If BlackBoard cannot meet their needs, consider 
using Cornell’s course site service instead, where you can design your own site. See  
www.cit.cornell.edu/atc/itsupport/webservices.shtml
for more information.  
52 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; pdf form filler
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
convert excel to fillable pdf form; pdf create fillable form
VII.  Choosing and Converting File Types  
No one file type provides the answer to accessibility. Knowing what you do now about the 
plusses and minus of different kinds of files (e.g., Word, PowerPoint, HTML), you are the best 
judge about which best fits your content, your needs, the needs of your audience, your skill set 
and your budget.  
Sometimes it will make sense to convert most or all of your content to HTML. Sometimes you’ll 
be able to work with the source file, using what you have started to learn here, to make it 
accessible directly as a download.  
If you do want to convert a Microsoft Office file into accessible HTML, your best bet might be 
the Illinois Accessible Web Publishing Wizard for Microsoft Office, online at 
www.accessiblewizards.uiuc.edu
. You can test it for free, and a license costs about $40.  
For converting PDFs to HTML, Adobe offers a free online tool at: 
www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/access_onlinetools.html
.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
53
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; create a writable pdf form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf; fillable pdf forms
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Appendix A – 508 Guidelines from A to P 
Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, last amended in 1998, requires that the federal government 
make all of its information technology accessible to people with disabilities. Only part of it deals 
with the Web.  Cornell is adopting these Section 508 web standards for making our web sites 
accessible.  
The Section 508 Guidelines for the Web
Each of these 16 “rules” is covered in this workbook, albeit not exactly in this way or order. 
Refer back to the Table of Contents to find information on each.  
These are taken directly from www.section508.gov
and are the core of Cornell’s draft 
accessibility policy. Note that this listing reflects neither how common nor how important a 
guideline might be. For example, making your downloadable files accessible will likely take up 
much of your time, but that “rule” is relatively buried in guideline “m”. 
A compliance mind-set, where you mindlessly check off each “rule” that 
you are following without thinking through your design with disabled users 
in mind, is unlikely to lead to a useable site. So as important as these 
rules and guidelines are, they are not sufficient. Think access.  
The “Rules” 
a) A text equivalent for every non-text element shall be provided (e.g., via "alt", "longdesc", or in 
element content).  
(b) Equivalent alternatives for any multimedia presentation shall be synchronized with the 
presentation.  
(c) Web pages shall be designed so that all information conveyed with color is also available 
without color, for example from context or markup.  
(d) Documents shall be organized so they are readable without requiring an associated style 
sheet.  
(e) Redundant text links shall be provided for each active region of a server-side image map.  
(f) Client-side image maps shall be provided instead of server-side image maps except where the 
regions cannot be defined with an available geometric shape.  
(g) Row and column headers shall be identified for data tables.  
(h) Markup shall be used to associate data cells and header cells for data tables that have two or 
54 
more logical levels of row or column headers.  
(i) Frames shall be titled with text that facilitates frame identification and navigation.  
(j) Pages shall be designed to avoid causing the screen to flicker with a frequency greater than 2 
Hz and lower than 55 Hz.  
(k) A text-only page, with equivalent information or functionality, shall be provided to make a 
web site comply with the provisions of this part, when compliance cannot be accomplished in 
any other way. The content of the text-only page shall be updated whenever the primary page 
changes.  
(l) When pages utilize scripting languages to display content, or to create interface elements, the 
information provided by the script shall be identified with functional text that can be read by 
assistive technology.  
(m) When a web page requires that an applet, plug-in or other application be present on the client 
system to interpret page content, the page must provide a link to a plug-in or applet that complies 
with §1194.21(a) through (l).  
(n) When electronic forms are designed to be completed on-line, the form shall allow people 
using assistive technology to access the information, field elements, and functionality required 
for completion and submission of the form, including all directions and cues.  
(o) A method shall be provided that permits users to skip repetitive navigation links.  
(p) When a timed response is required, the user shall be alerted and given sufficient time to 
indicate more time is required.  
Resources on Section 508
Full information on Section 508 is online at www.section508.gov
. From there, look up the 508 
Law Technical Standards on “1194.22 Web-based intranet and internet information and 
applications.”   
WebAIM has a nice chart detailing what would “pass” and “fail” against each 508 rule at 
www.webaim.org/standards/508/checklist.php
. The University of Wisconsin provides an 
extensive online library of 508-centered resources including: 
A detailed explanation of each rule, a-p: 
http://helpdesk.wisc.edu/accessibility/guideline/508guidelines.html
Good and bad examples of each rule being fulfilled (or not): 
www.cew.wisc.edu/accessibility/evaluation/section508presentation.htm
An online course on web accessibility, organized by 508 guidelines: 
www.doit.wisc.edu/accessibility/online-course/start.htm
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
55
A Web Accessibility Primer: Usability for Everyone 
Appendix B – Related Accessibility Resources 
This appendix compiles all the topic-specific resources mentioned throughout this workbook and 
provides an overview of general resources on web accessibility, as well as what is available at 
Cornell.  
Of course, the web is a moving target, so if you find that any of these sites are no longer 
operational, or have another good resource to suggest, please contact the Office of Web 
Communications.  
Cornell Resources 
Join the new email discussion list on Web accessibility, webaccessibility-l.  This list 
disseminates progress on the draft policy, training and education opportunities, and other 
developments in this area. It is also a forum for you to ask question and discuss accessibility 
issues. To join the list, send an email to webaccessibility-l-request@cornell.edu with the word 
"join" (no quotes) in the body. 
Cornell provides some HTML templates at http://cornelllogo.cornell.edu/templates
. These have 
accessible options such as including “skip navigation.”  
Cornell’s draft web accessibility policy is at www.cit.cornell.edu/policy/drafts/WebAccess.html
This workbook and announcements about associated training sessions are online under “Web 
Accessibility” at www.cit.cornell.edu/policy/framework-chart.html
General Resources 
Web Accessibility in Mind (www.webaim.org
), or WebAIM, may be the best single introduction 
to online accessibility. It hosts an extensive collection of articles and how-tos on accessibility 
generally and on specific applications and file types. WebAIM also provides insight into how 
people with different kinds of disabilities access the web, including many simulations and 
videos. 
Checklists
If you like checklists, you might find these sites helpful: 
This Quick Accessibility Checklist is meant to help faculty and staff who want to 
develop or modify Web-based course material, lectures, and assignments in an 
accessible way: http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/accessibility/check.html
.  
56 
These Guidelines for Accessible Distance Education categorize strategies into musts, 
shoulds and mays for PDF, Excel, Flash, PowerPoint, Video and Word: 
www.catea.org/grade/guides/introduction.php
.  
Link Collections
Some nice resource list collections include: 
A collection of accessibility papers and other articles written by consultant Roger 
Hudson, along with and links to other sites and tools: 
www.usability.com.au/resources
An incredibly long list of websites on nearly all accessibility topics. This is 
particularly good if you are looking for something particular and don’t know where to 
start: www.d.umn.edu/itss/support/Training/Online/webdesign/accessibility.html
A nicely annotated list of “user experience design resources” about accessibility is at  
www.deyalexander.com/resources/uxd/accessibility.html
. It includes links to many 
contextualizing discussion articles.    
Online Courses and Tutorials
Online courses and tutorials covering web accessibility generally include:  
A Section 508 Web Accessibility Tutorial includes sections on text alternatives, 
checking accessibility, navigation, image maps, audio and multimedia, color/flicker 
use, forms, tables, scripts and applets, style sheets, and 508 provisions:  
www.jimthatcher.com/webcourse1.htm 
The Access E-Learning tutorial, available via free registration, provides extensive 
information and practice labs on disabilities, creating an accessibility plan, 
PowerPoint, Video, Flash, Word, Excel, PDF, HTML and Scripts/Java: 
www.accesselearning.net
.  
“Web Accessibility 101” course is organized by 508 guidelines, and also includes 
information on evaluating for accessibility: www.doit.wisc.edu/accessibility/online-
course/start.htm
The New York State Forum's IT Accessibility Committee created an “Accessibility 
Curriculum” in 2005, also available online. It includes introductory information and 
covers images, cascading style sheets, tables, forms, scripting, PDF, XML, 
multimedia tools, usability and validation/evaluation. The curriculum includes useful 
sample files to demonstrate each concept, and HTML and PowerPoint versions of 
each curriculum topic: www.nysfirm.org/accessibility/resources/curriculum
.  
Office of Web Communications, Cornell University 
57
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested