convert pdf to image in asp.net c# : Create fillable form from pdf Library software component asp.net winforms windows mvc Reducing-Transatlantic-Barriers-TTIP3-part1777

Technical Discussion on CGE Modelling Set Up
23
In the CGE model, there is a single representative or  composite  household  in each 
region.  Household  income  is  allocated  to  government,  personal  consumption,  and 
savings. In each  region the composite  household  owns endowments of the factors 
of production and receives income  by selling the services of these factors to firms. 
It  also  receives  income  from  tariff  revenue  and  rents  accruing  from import/export 
quota licenses. Part of the income is distributed as subsidy payments to some sectors, 
primarily in agriculture. 
Taxes  are  included  at  several  levels  in  the  model.  Production  taxes  are placed  on 
intermediate or primary inputs, or on output. Tariffs are levied at the border. Additional 
internal  taxes are  placed  on domestic or imported intermediate inputs, and  may be 
applied at differential rates that  discriminate against imports. Where  relevant, taxes 
are also placed on exports, and on primary factor income. Finally, where relevant (as 
indicated by social accounting data) taxes are placed on final consumption, and can be 
applied differentially to consumption of domestic and imported goods. 
On the production side, in all sectors, firms employ domestic production factors (capital, 
labour and land) and intermediate inputs from domestic and foreign sources to produce 
outputs in the most cost-efficient way that technology allow. In most sectors, perfect 
competition is assumed, with products from different regions modelled as imperfect 
substitutes. 
Heavy manufacturing sectors are modelled with imperfect or monopolistic competition. 
Monopolistic  competition  involves  scale  economies  that  are  internal  to  each  firm, 
depending  on  its  own  production level. An  important  property  of the monopolistic 
competition model is that increased specialisation at intermediate stages of production 
yields  returns  due  to  specialisation,  where  the  sector  as  a  whole  becomes  more 
productive the broader the range of specialised inputs. In models of this type, part of 
the impact of policy changes in final consumption follows from changes in available 
choices (the variety of goods they can choose from). Similarly firms are affected by 
changes in available choices (varieties) of intermediate inputs. Changes in available 
Create fillable form from pdf - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
pdf fillable form creator; create fillable form from pdf
Create fillable form from pdf - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
change font in pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
24
varieties also involve changes in available foreign varieties, in addition to domestic 
one. As a result, changes in consumer and firm input choices will “spill-over” between 
countries as they trade with each other. 
Tariffs and tariff revenues are explicit in the standard GTAP database, and therefore can 
be directly incorporated into the model used here directly from the standard database. 
However, NTBs affecting goods and services trade, as well as cost savings linked to 
trade facilitation are not explicit in the database and we need to take steps to capture 
these  effects. Where NTBs  leads to higher  costs, we follow the standard  approach 
to modelling iceberg or dead-weight trade costs in the GTAP framework, originally 
developed by Francois (1999, 2001) with support from the EC to study the Millennium 
Round (now known as the Doha Round).
10
 It has featured in the joint EC-Canadian 
government study on an EU-Canada FTA, as well as the 2009 Ecorys study on EU-US 
non-tariff barriers. In formal terms, we model changes in the efficiency of production 
for sale in specific markets. In this sense, we can capture the impact that NTBs can 
have in raising costs when serving foreign markets. Where NTBs instead involve higher 
prices because of rents, we model this as additional mark-ups (higher prices) accruing 
to firms. As highlighted already in the discussion in Chapter 2, there is an approximate 
60:40 split between cost generating NTBs and rent generating NBTs, in terms of impact.
3.2.  Sectors and regions in the model 
While in the GTAP data about 60 sectors and 130 different regions are available, for the 
purpose of this study we have aggregated sectors and regions to allow us to concentrate 
on the key results. The sector and regional aggregations are presented in Table 3.
10  The original Francois approach has grown from a specialized extension in early applications to a now standard feature of 
the GTAP model, following its incorporation by Hertel, Walmsley and Itakura (2001).
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF
create a writable pdf form; convert pdf to form fill
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
converting pdf to fillable form; pdf create fillable form
Technical Discussion on CGE Modelling Set Up
25
Table 3  Sectors and regions used in the CGE model
Sectors
Regions
Agr forestry fisheries
European Union
Other primary sectors
United States
Processed foods
Other OECD, high income
Chemicals
East Europe
Electrical machinery
Mediterranean
Motor vehicles
China
Other transport equipment
India
Other machinery
ASEAN
Metals and metal products
MERCOSUR
Wood and paper products
Low Income
Other manufactures
Rest of World
Water transport
Air transport
Finance
Insurance
Business services
Communications
Construction
Personal services
Other services
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in
add signature field to pdf; pdf signature field
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
attach image to pdf form; create fillable forms in pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
create fillable form pdf online; change font size pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
pdf add signature field; convert pdf to fill in form
27
In this chapter we summarize the policy scenarios used in the CGE assessment that 
follows in Chapter 5. This includes some explanation of concepts, such as “policy spill-
overs,” that are included in the scenarios.
4.1.   Scenarios
As discussed in Chapter 2, while it is conceivable for all tariffs to be removed, it is 
not realistic  to  assume that  all  NTBs and  costs from  regulatory  divergence  can be 
removed. This is because of the underlying differences in the nature of these measures. 
As a result when modelling the liberalisation of NTBs we must take into account the 
degree to  which  NTB-related  costs  can  realistically be reduced  (via various means 
and techniques). On the basis of the Ecorys (2009) survey, a reasonable underlying 
rule of thumb is that approximately 50 per cent of the cost/price impact of NTBs can 
be removed – i.e. they are “actionable.” While there is some variation by sector, the 
mapping from overall price/cost differences to those that can be negotiated on reflects 
this finding, which is based on expert opinions, cross-checks with regulators, legislators 
and businesses supported by the business survey from the Ecorys (2009) study. Against 
this background, the study is set up around scenarios differing with respect to levels of 
ambition and scope of coverage. The scenarios are summarized in Table 4 below. 
The scenarios summarized in the table are relatively modest. Starting from the level of 
barriers reported in Table 2, only about half of the barriers are considered as negotiable 
or actionable. Of these, half are reduced in the most ambitious scenario (or 25 percent 
4.  The Policy Options Considered   
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert pdf fillable forms; acrobat fill in pdf forms
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
create a fillable pdf form; pdf fillable form
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
28
of total NTBs in Table 2). This is the most ambitious scenario. The modest scenarios 
assume even less reduction in NTBs. Under both the ambitious and modest scenarios, it 
is assumed that more aggressive liberalization is applied to procurement. The scenarios 
reported here  are therefore far less ambitious than under the  original Ecorys study, 
where full elimination of actionable NTBs was assumed.
Table 4  Scenario Summaries
Narrow (limited) FTA Scenarios
Tariffs only
98 per cent of tariffs eliminated
Services only
10 per cent of services NTBs eliminated
Procurement only
25 per cent of procurement NTBs eliminated
Comprehensive Scenarios
Less ambitious
98 per cent of tariffs eliminated
10 per cent of NTBs eliminated on both goods 
and services (20 per cent of actionable)
25 per cent of procurement NTBs eliminated
Ambitious
100 per cent of tariffs eliminated
25 per cent of NTBs eliminated on both goods 
and services (50 per cent of actionable)
50 per cent of procurement NTBs eliminated
4.2.  Spill-overs 
The simulations that are carried out also take into account concepts of both regulatory 
convergence and regulatory spill-overs. More specifically, in setting up the experiments, 
we have included two sets of possible effects beyond bilateral liberalization. These are 
defined as follows. First, we have included direct spill-overs. These are based on the 
assumption that improved regulatory conditions negotiated between the EU and the US 
will also result in a limited fall in related trade costs for third countries exporting to the 
EU and US. In other words, this captures the extent to which the bilateral streamlining 
of regulations and standards, and reduction in regulatory burdens, also benefit other 
exporters to the EU and US. This positive market access effect for third countries is 
modelled as being around 20 per cent of the bilateral fall in trade cost related to NTBs 
for the core scenarios. (We have also examined 10 per cent spill-overs as a robustness 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
change font size in pdf fillable form; convert word to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
create fillable pdf form from word; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
The Policy Options Considered
29
check.) This concept was introduced in the EU-Japan study by Copenhagen Economics 
(2009). In practice, it means that if there is 5 per cent NTB-related trade cost reduction 
between the EU and US, there will also be a 1 per cent trade cost reduction for third 
countries exporting to the EU and US. The logic is that firms in third countries may find 
it easier to meet either EU or US regulatory requirements if bilateral negotiations lead 
to simplifications that are not inherently discriminatory. Kox and Lejour (2006), for 
example, provide evidence that differences in regulations can increase operating costs 
in different markets, reducing bilateral trade.
A second indirect effect involving third countries is considered as well: the indirect spill-
overs. These are meant to gauge the economic implications if third countries adopt some 
of the common standards agreed between the EU and the US. Given that, collectively, 
the EU and the US would stand as the world’s biggest trading block, there is a very 
real possibility that mutual agreement on regulations and standards would be adopted, 
partially, also by third countries. Thus, where the EU and the US act as a regulatory 
hegemon, there is scope for setting de facto common, global standards. This implies 
that the bilateral agreement will give EU and the US improved market access in third 
markets from reduced NTBs. In addition, there will be scope for reductions in NTBs 
amongst third countries, as  they converge further on common standards. Therefore, 
indirect spill-overs will lead to lower costs and greater trade between third countries as 
well. We have modelled indirect spill-overs as 50 per cent of the direct spill-over rate. 
This means that for example for a 5 per cent trade cost reduction between the EU and 
US, and with 20 per cent corresponding direct spill-overs, we will have a 1 per cent 
(direct spill-over) reduction for third countries exporting to the US or EU, and a 0.5 per 
cent (indirect spill-over) reduction for EU and US export costs to third countries, and 
for trade between third countries. 
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
30
4.3.  Sectoral effects: Preliminary ranking
At this stage, we have spelled out trade flows, tariff barriers, and non-tariff barriers. 
In what follows in Chapter 5, we will focus on effects. Before doing so, it is useful to 
benchmark expectations. What we mean is that, before we turn to modelling results, 
we want to provide a non-model based ranking of some important sources of likely 
effects.  This  involves the data  summarized in Table  5  below.  In the Table, column 
A summarizes the total value of tariffs and actionable NTBs (as defined by Ecorys) 
applied by the US against EU exports. The next two columns summarize the importance 
of each sector to total EU exports to the US. Column B is based on gross values, while 
column C is based instead on the value added contained in exports.
11
 In column C, we 
see that while chemicals are 12.38 percent of exports on a gross value basis, they are 
somewhat less important on a value added basis, accounting for 11.21 percent of EU 
value added contained in exports to the EU. As a crude first pass at possible effects, 
column E provides an impact-ranking index. This is based on the value added contained 
in exports by sector (C), the scope for liberalization (A), and the price elasticity of 
demand for imports (D). Together, these provide a rough estimate of increased exports, 
on a value added basis, following from improved market access to the US for EU firms. 
For example, of the total value added contained in EU exports to the US, column E says 
that full liberalization in chemicals could yield an 8.39 percent increase in total exports 
to the US on a value added basis. As it is value added that translates into GDP, the index 
also provides a crude ranking of overall GDP impacts of sector-specific liberalization. 
11  See Francois, Manchin, and Tomberger (2012) for explanation of the value added calculations, which are based on our 
CGE model database
The Policy Options Considered
31
Table 5  Impact ranking indexes
A
B
C
D
E=.01*A*C*D
 
actionable 
NTBs + tariffs
gross export 
share
export value 
added share
price elasticity
index
Agr forestry 
fisheries
3.70
1.73
2.09
4.77
0.37
Other primary 
sectors
0.00
1.36
1.70
12.13
0.00
Processed foods
48.93
4.42
4.71
2.46
5.67
Chemicals
14.69
12.38
11.21
5.09
8.39
Electrical 
machinery
9.91
1.09
0.94
9.65
0.89
Motor vehicles
22.49
8.81
7.11
10.00
15.99
Other transport 
equipment
8.63
5.31
4.94
7.14
3.04
Other machinery
0.80
16.92
16.25
9.71
1.26
Metals and metal 
products
6.69
2.75
2.53
13.91
2.36
Wood and paper 
products
5.76
2.42
2.61
7.99
1.20
Other 
manufactures
3.20
7.32
4.90
6.56
1.03
Water transport
0.65
0.05
0.04
3.80
0.00
Air transport
2.35
3.12
2.41
3.80
0.22
Finance
6.46
6.20
7.45
2.04
0.98
Insurance
3.84
6.02
7.10
3.18
0.87
Business services
1.58
10.07
12.28
3.18
0.62
Communications
0.65
0.85
1.01
3.18
0.02
Construction
0.90
0.35
0.36
4.21
0.01
Personal services
0.66
1.49
1.76
8.71
0.10
Other (public) 
services
0.00
7.36
8.59
3.92
0.00
Source: CGE calculations.
The estimates in column E of Table 5 are of course partial equilibrium. They miss cross-
sector effects, including labour market interaction and intermediate linkages. They also 
miss consumer benefits from access to more goods and services. Even so, they provide 
a clear ranking of likely effects. This ranking carries through the estimates in the next 
chapter,  and so it is worth  discussing  the pattern for the impact  indexes briefly, as 
shown in Figure 10. From the figure, we can see that for some sectors, especially motor 
vehicles, though they  are not dominant on a value added basis, the  combination of 
Reducing Transatlantic Barriers to Trade and Investment – An Economic Assessment
32
high elasticities and high trade barriers means that, overall, these sectors are likely to 
dominate in terms of impact. By the same logic, despite the fact that “other machinery” 
is a major sector on a value added basis, the low level of barriers means it does not 
rank highly in terms of expected benefits from improved market access. From Figure 
10, the manufacturing sectors are likely to have the greatest impact by far overall. This 
includes motor vehicles, chemicals, processed foods, and other transport equipment. 
In contrast, while value added shares are comparable for the services sectors (business 
services is  more  important  on  a value added  basis than  either  chemicals  or  motor 
vehicles), the combination of low elasticities and relatively low barriers means that, 
overall, we expect the greatest impact of market access on exports and GDP to be from 
liberalization on good sectors, and especially chemicals, machinery (vehicles and other 
transport equipment), and processed foods. The pattern in Figure 10 reveals itself again 
when report results in Chapter 5. Manufacturing liberalization is the primary driver of 
benefits from improved trade-related market access.
Figure 10  Value added and impact rankings
Source: own calculations. See Table 5.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested