asp.net c# pdf to image : Change font size pdf fillable form application SDK tool html wpf azure online report4-part1815

THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter I: The Millennial Challenge
41
Footnotes for Chapter I
1
Davis (1959), p. 63, quotes 9.2 per cent in cities above 20,000 for 1900, 20.9 per cent for 1950.
2
Japan, with just over 30 per cent, is an anomaly.
3
Latest estimates suggest that the third biggest city in Brazil is the informal city of São Paulo; with a
turnover of $3 billion in 1998, its economy is as large as Israel’s.
4
It should perhaps be remembered that Robert Solow’s neoclassical model of total factor productivity
(1957) incorporated technical progress which was both capital and resource saving, though the latter
was not mentioned explicitly. ‘Factor Four’ thus signalizes and demands a reorientation of economic
activities and a reorientation of intellectual efforts using analytical tools.
Change font size pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf file to fillable form; add fillable fields to pdf
Change font size pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
attach image to pdf form; convert pdf fill form
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
42
II TRENDS AND OUTCOMES: THE URBAN WORLD OF 2025
1. 
Introduction: The Basic Driving Forces
Basic  driving  forces  will  shape  the  urban  world  of  2025:  demographic,  economic,  social,
environmental. In Chapter II we look at these forces and at the resulting pattern of cities and city life.
In the short and medium term, at least, urban policy-makers must accept these forces of change and
these constraints as given; but they can bend and shape them, to serve their objectives. The political
process, itself one of the drivers, can help shape the way the economy and society and technology and
culture develop. It should  do this, as  suggested in  Chapter  I, based on the  principles of sustainable
human development, delivered through good urban governance.
Thus, urban governance will interact with the local economy and with the exogenous forces. And the
driving forces themselves interrelate with each other in a complex way. This makes the task of urban
governance exceedingly complex and demanding.
At  least  some  of  these  interrelationships  are  predictable.  High  population  growth  reduces  the
possibility  of  rapid  growth  of  income  per  head;  conversely,  rising  per  capita  income  is  in  general
associated  with  falling  birth  rates  and  so  with  lower  rates  of  population  growth,  increasing  the
chances to improve quality of life. Yet, at later stages of development, the relationships become less
clear: increasing income disparities may be associated with divergences in fertility patterns, including
high  rates  of  pregnancy  among  lone  teenage  females.  And  advanced  societies,  in  spite  of  low
population growth, may display relatively high rates of household formation, with consequent effects
on demand for housing and consumer durables. Other things being equal, increased rates of household
formation in all  cities  with  rising  incomes are  likely  to  create  big demands for  additional  housing,
decoupling population growth and spatial needs, which will  lead to increasing dispersal from cities
into surrounding suburban rings.
As already observed in Chapter I, rising incomes, most importantly, bring rising car ownership. And
in these cities, more people  tend to own cars at a given income level than in  developed  cities: first
because driving is often cheaper here, especially in oil-producing countries, and second because other
costs,  such  as  those  for  housing,  are  lower  in  tropical  and  subtropical  cities.  And  higher  car
ownership,  in  turn,  will tend  to  lead  to  increasing  dispersal  from  cities  into  surrounding  suburban
rings. This  is a prime  illustration  of the  complexities  of sustainable  development: unless  growth  in
income and wealth is accompanied by positive measures (such as enhancement of public transport) it
can all too easily produce negative effects such as an increase in pollution.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
convert pdf to fillable form; create a pdf form to fill out
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
43
For urbanists, these interrelationships between driving forces represent a challenge: it proves difficult
to predict future paths of development. And this is especially true in the medium and long term, over
twenty and  more  years.  In  1950  it  would  have  proved  nearly  impossible  to  forecast  the  economic
miracle  that  transformed  Munich  from  a  provincial  capital  and  central  place  for  an  agrarian
hinterland, into one of the leading high-tech cities of Europe; or to guess at the economic development
that would take some Asian cities to the ranks of the world’s richest (but then threaten them again, as
their economies went into crisis); or to credit the unravelling of the urban economies that followed the
fall of communism in Russia.
Still more  difficult, if anything, would have been to predict the  fortunes  of cities  in the developing
world. In 1952, Seoul had been virtually wiped out by the Korean War; its transformation into one of
the  great  industrial  power-houses  of  Eastern  Asia  would  have  been  well-nigh  unimaginable;  the
people  of  Nairobi,  a  charming  colonial  capital  soon  to  experience  the  stresses  and  strains  of  the
independence movement, could likewise never have envisaged its future as a city of 2.7 million, with
a  large majority  living  in  abject  poverty in ever-spreading shanty towns,  as  industrial development
failed to keep pace with in-migration and population growth.
These examples show that driving forces are not inexorable or irreversible: they have to be translated
and  transformed  into  local  growth  preconditions.  The  secret  is  how  to  use  the  driving  forces
positively, to promote local development; and this must be done locally.
In  the  paragraphs  that  follow,  we  trace  these  driving  forces  and  their  impacts.  There  is  one  key
question that will need to be raised each  time: to  what  extent will the  urban  world of  2025  display
common  problems  –  and,  conversely,  to  what  extent  are  the  developed  and  the  developing  world
different, even contradictory?
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
convert pdf to form fillable; convert fillable pdf to html form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
convert pdf into fillable form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
44
2. 
Demographic Change
2.1  Demography and the Urban Explosion
In the world of demography we see two different and opposite imbalances, partly created by policies:
rapid  and burdensome  population  growth  in many  developing  cities,  equally  problematic  ageing  in
many developed cities.
In the developing cities,  the problem is  that the  explosive  growth  of  the recent  past has left a very
young population and thus a still rapidly growing number of young families. In these countries, seven
major factors appear to be principally responsible for urban growth. The first five affect rural areas,
producing powerful and even draconian incentives to move to the city:
1. Big productivity gains in agriculture due to mechanization, allowing fewer and fewer farmers to
feed more and more city dwellers, and leading to rural over-population;
2. Coupled in some cases with lack of arable land and over-exploitation leading to soil exhaustion;
3. Lack of resources (technological inputs, access to credit) and social services in rural areas;
4. Natural disasters and environmental degradation in rural areas;
5.  Growing civil unrest and internal conflicts in parts of Africa, Latin America and Asia.
But these are parallelled by trends in the cities to which the migrants go:
6. Better health care and consequent decreases in death rates, especially in the cities.
7. High birth rates in cities and increased life expectancy, mainly due to reduced infant mortality.
The cities offer the prospect of jobs, albeit precarious and poorly rewarded; they also offer as escape
from traditional thoughtways and traditional practices, often irresistible to the young. Push factors and
pull  factors  both  reflect  large  and  widening  disparities  between  regions,  between  cities  and
countryside  (UNCHS,  1996a). They produce the  major  global trends  summarized  by the  Habitat  II
agenda:
  : the concentration of the urban population in large cities;
   the sprawl of cities into wider geographical areas; and
   the rapid growth of mega-cities.
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
convert pdf file to fillable form online; .net fill pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
change font size in pdf fillable form; convert word form to fillable pdf form
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
45
In most  developing  countries, these forces focus  on just one or two  major  cities;  current estimates
indicate that in some countries, migration to capital cities may be responsible for up to 80 per cent of
all internal population movements. But increasingly the growth of cities depends on their own natural
increase rather than migration.
Rapid  population  growth  has  at  least  two  highly  negative  consequences, especially  because  of  the
very  large  numbers  of  children.  First,  it  severely  hinders  the  capacity  of  poorer  cities  to  increase
infrastructure  per  head,  to  provide  an  adequate  number  of  jobs  or  homes  or  school  places.  Each
individual needs a growing endowment for survival and much more than that for a decent standard of
life in the urban environment. Without a certain definite minimum of education and training, such an
individual is very unlikely to succeed in the modern urban economy.
Second,  the  survival  problems  of  the  rapidly-growing  young  generation  tend  to  override  all  other
considerations. The time horizons of the present generation shrink; their pressing needs compel a life
of  day-to-day  survival.  Only  when  their  survival  problems  are  solved  will  citizens  and  decision-
makers be free to turn their attention to the survival and quality of life of future generations.
Sub-Saharan Africa offers  a special and extremely nightmarish variant  on  the general  pattern: here,
more than 8 million children under 15 have lost one or both parents to AIDS, and by 2010 the number
is expected to reach 40 million, 16 per cent of all children under 15. An enormous burden will fall on
grandparents and other relatives, and there are growing numbers of street children.
But in  many cities in the  developed  world, the problem  is the ageing of the population.  Here, birth
rates are plunging below replacement rate, creating a skewed age structure where in the long run more
and  more  elderly  have  to  be  fed  and  helped  by  shrinking  numbers  of  active  younger  people:  the
proportion of  people over 65 has increased from 7.9 per cent in 1950 to  13.5 per cent today and is
expected  to  reach  24.7 per  cent  by  2050; the  most  rapidly  ageing  countries (which  include  Japan,
Germany and Italy) will approach or exceed 40 per cent of their populations at older ages. The effects
on urban society are hard to forecast; at present, we can only ask questions, such as:
  Will the slower renewal of human capital through ageing reduce innovative potential?
  How can urban systems stay flexible and innovative?
  Will people be capable of lifelong learning to overcome the ageing of knowledge?
  Will  the  family  as  producer  of  care  and  personal  services  for  old  people  be  replaced  by  new
associations (of old people), who take over the role of families as provider of services?
  How  do  societies  deal  with  a  rising  burden  of  dependency,  whereby  a  diminishing  number  of
younger working people have to generate more and more income to support increasing numbers
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
46
of  pensioners?  If past  trends  continue,  in 2030,  public  spending on  old  age  security  in  OECD
countries will be 16.5 per cent of GDP. How will these younger working people react politically
to the growing social security taxes? How will they cope with the resulting reduced incentives to
work, or to the possible flight of capital to other nations and other cities?
We cannot answer these questions now. But we need to find answers to them, and we return to these
challenges in Chapter IV. Before we do this, however, we need to examine the trends in greater detail.
For  this,  we  need  a  slightly  more  sophisticated basis  than  the  familiar  binary  contrast,  developing
versus  developed;  we  need  to  add  an  intermediate  category,  countries  and  cities  in  demographic
transition.
2.2  The City of Hypergrowth
In the earliest stage of demographic development, as is well known, high birth rates are accompanied
by  reductions  in  death  rates.  They  result  in  a  high  rate  of  natural  population  increase  and  a  high
proportion of young people. This demands large investment in human capital (high education costs).
Because of high birth rates, the age structure of the population of these countries is generally young.
In Kenya, for example, 52 per cent of the population are less than 15 and only 2.8 per cent are over
65. This is clearly an extreme case, but in most of the developing cities in the next ten to twenty years,
the large numbers of the under-15s and those in their 20s entering the labour  force and the housing
market will still create enormous stresses on poorly developed education, health and housing systems,
on infrastructure, on mass transit systems, and on hospitals.
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
47































 






 








































Source: WRI, UNEP, UNDP, World Bank (1996).
0,00
0,20
0,40
0,60
0,80
1,00
1,20
1,40
1,60
1950-55
1955-60
1960-65
1965-70
1970-75
1975-80
1980-85
1985-90
1990-95
1995-2000
Male life expectancy
Female life expectancy
Total Fertility Rate
Infant Mortality Rate
LIFE 
EXPECTANCY
FERTILITY 
AND
MORTALITY


2.3  Cities in Demographic Transition
But there is one ray of hope in the cities of the developing world: although their high percentages of
young people will automatically result in large numbers of children during the next twenty years, the
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
48
number of births per woman is already shrinking and will shrink further, with improved education of
women and urban living conditions. Urbanization and urban culture produce a sharp fall in birth rates;
countries and  cities enter into  a  phase of  demographic  transition.  Contraceptive knowledge  spreads
and the economic value of children declines, particularly because of the costs of their longer and more
intensive education. Thus, the next generation be smaller, and will enjoy more care – especially time
for their education.
Such demographic cycles are now often much  more rapid  than they were in  developed  cities at the
equivalent point in demographic evolution, about 100-200 years ago. But they will become easier to
manage,  because  –  as  we  show  later  –  many  of  these  countries  and  cities  are  experiencing  rapid
economic  growth.  Thus  the  quality  of  population  change  will  alter  more  than  the  overall  figures
signal.
And, in the more advanced among these countries, falling births are already producing a ‘workforce
bulge’ which  is a  ‘demographic  bonus’ to these  countries; recent  East  Asian  experience,  where the
ratio of working-age to non-working people will rise to a peak around 2010, shows clearly that it is
likely  to  contribute  quite  strongly  to  economic  growth. Over the  next  few  decades  there  will  be  a
demographic shift towards an older population in all countries; and by 2045-2050, no less than 97 per
cent of the growth of the old age population  will be in today’s developing countries. However, the
proportions of old people will still be relatively low compared with the developed world.
In  a  few  cases  (Singapore  in  the  1980s)  governments  may  become  concerned  about  this  process,
trying to raise the birth rate again among the more highly educated groups. However, all such attempts
have been rare.
2.4  Mature Developed Cities – Ageing and Implosion
Birth rates in developed cities generally remain low and in some cases (Western European countries
in  the  1980s  and  1990s)  fertility  rates  have  fallen  below  replacement  levels.  Because  of  this,
immigration  –  especially  of  workers  to  fill  lower-skill,  lower-paid  jobs  –  has  become  a  critical
element, subject to State control.
The  other  major  factor  is  household  ‘fission’  –  the  fall  in  average  household  size  and  the  rapid
increase in numbers of one-person households, resulting from both demographic and social change –
more young people leaving parental homes for higher education; higher divorce and separation rates;
more old people outliving their partners for longer periods; and, most startlingly, more young people
choosing to live  alone. There has  been fierce  debate, in  some  countries, as to  the degree  to  which
policy  can  control  this  process.  In  the  United  Kingdom  the  government  has  announced  an  end  to
‘predict and provide’  housing  policies,  implicitly accepting  the  argument  that  household  formation
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
49
(e.g. by young people) depends  at  least  in part  on housing availability.  However  the  best  available
evidence suggests that failure to provide housing will lead to real hardship (e.g. young people living
involuntarily with their parents; separating couples forced to continue to cohabit).
Because of continuing medical advances in high-income countries, predictions show a huge increase
of older (post-retirement) groups between 2000 and 2025. The pyramidical age structure thus changes
into something resembling a tree.
Population in thousands
1
6
11
16
21
26
31
36
41
46
51
56
61
66
71
76
81
86
91
96
Ag e
150
100
100
50
50
150
fem ale
male


Public social security services, especially  provision  of health  care, will  become  extremely  costly as
labour  costs  will  be  high,  particularly  where  those  services  have  to  be  paid  out  of  net  income  in
economies  with  high  tax burdens. To date  no  city  with  a  rapidly-increasing  elderly population has
found a means to cope with and provide for growing service needs.
A significant proportion of the population will be in the ‘old  old’  group (85+). They will impose  a
new, and so far unknown, economic  burden  through their  needs  for  health and medical  care  in an
economy with a declining proportion of working people. In particular, the ‘old old’ are likely to have
special  housing  needs.  One  question  here  is  the  extension  of  retirement  ages  or  the  abolition  of
mandatory  retirement,  as  has  already  occurred  in  the  United  States,  to  reduce  the  burden  of
dependency.
Falling  birth  rates  in  developed  cities,  as  many  surveys  show,  are  in  part  a  consequence  of  urban
lifestyles, especially women’s higher  participation in the labour force and  the high investments and
time  costs  of  rearing  children  and  providing  for  their  security.  Today  in  cities,  providing  care,
attention, supervision and services for children has become extremely expensive compared with the
THE URBAN FUTURE 21 – Chapter II: Trends and Outcomes: The Urban World of 2025
50
typical  informal  support  systems  earlier  developed  in  villages  or  suburban  environments,  or  as
compared  to  past  urban  lifestyles.  Housing  which  is  adequate  for  families  (quiet  streets  with  low
density of transportation, small houses with only one family per building) is expensive. Mothers with
highly qualified jobs pay a high price when they have children, as their careers can suffer. Work and
the role of a mother are not easily compatible.
The overall  shift  is  accompanied  by  a  shrinking  household  size; in  many  cities  75  per  cent  of  the
people live in households with one or two persons. More than 30 per cent of the urban dwellers will
have  no  children.  This  means  that  the  traditional  role  of  the  family  in  providing  services  for  the
elderly will break down, especially as the proportion of women who are in employment is still rising.
The consequences of this imbalance in age structure are hard to forecast, as we have no experience of
it; we can only speculate. One risk is that because of ageing, human capital can depreciate in terms of
a decline in technical knowledge, flexibility and mobility. Cities with high percentages of pensioners
may run  the  risk  of  a  flight  of  capital  to  ‘younger  regions’  with  higher growth  rates  and  possibly
higher increases in productivity. Saving rates, especially among people between 55 and 70 years, tend
to be very low at the same time as competition for scarce capital is increasing and the urban systems
become economically less attractive.

  
             
            






Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested