c# convert pdf to image : Convert pdf fillable form Library software component asp.net wpf windows mvc rulesprecedents13-part1923

S 75 
SECTION 15 -- IMMEDIATE TRANSMITTAL 
15-1.1     
NOT APPLICABLE TO BILL PLACED ON CONSENT CALENDAR 
(
Formerly SP 183
The  bill,  as  amended,  was  placed  on  the  consent  calendar.  A  senator  then  requested 
immediate transmittal to the House. 
The president ruled that, if immediate transmittal to the House was desired, the bill 
had to be removed from the consent calendar, passed on a roll call, and then transmitted 
under a suspension of the rules. Otherwise, the bill would be transmitted to the House with 
the rest of the bills passed on consent at the end of the session day. 
O'Neill, May 2, 1980. 
15-1.2    
IMMEDIATE TRANSMITTAL TO THE HOUSE (JR 17) (
Overruled
(
Formerly SP 182
On the next to the last day of the session, a bill creating a state inspector general was 
called in the Senate. The bill was amended by House "A," which the Senate rejected. The Senate 
then adopted Senate "A." After the vote was announced, the majority leader moved to suspend 
the  rules  for  immediate  transmittal  back  to  the  House.  The  minority  leader  objected  to  the 
suspension and asked for a roll call vote. The vote was 21 to 15 for suspension. Because it failed 
to receive the necessary two-thirds vote, the motion failed. 
After intervening business, the majority leader raised a point of order that, under JR 17, 
the inspector general bill should be immediately transmitted back to the House even though the 
rules had not been suspended. JR 17 provided for immediate transmittal in the last three session 
days of any bill on which one house rejects the other's amendment. The inspector general bill 
met this criterion. 
The president invited debate. 
The minority leader argued that JR 17 was not meant to allow automatic waiver of rules 
suspensions in the last three days, but merely to obviate the need for the house to which a bill is 
returned to print it on its calendar before taking action. He said use of the word "may" in the first 
part  of  the  rule  supported  his  interpretation  because  it  gave  the  receiving  house  a  choice  of 
whether to consider the bill. 
The president rejected the minority leader's argument concerning the first "may" in 
the rule, saying that because there was a comma after the clause containing the word, it did 
not enter into the interpretation of the crucial second half of the sentence. But he noted the 
word "may" is used throughout the rule. This means that the two houses can choose whether 
or not to transmit bills immediately without suspending the rules in the last three days. The 
inspector general bill met the standard of JR 17 in that the Senate had rejected the House 
amendment.  Even  so,  the  majority  leader  had  moved  to  suspend  the rules  for  immediate 
transmittal back to the House. By doing so, he chose not to exercise the automatic immediate 
transmittal option available under JR 17. The Senate failed to pass his motion by the requisite 
two-thirds. That decision could not now be reconsidered or altered because 
Mason
forbids 
reconsideration or renewal of a motion to suspend the rules for the same purpose on the same 
day without some alteration in the parliamentary situation (
Mason
283(6)).  
Convert pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create a pdf form to fill out and save; convert word form to pdf fillable form
Convert pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a fillable pdf form in word; converting a word document to pdf fillable form
S 76 
IMMEDIATE TRANSMITTAL ----- 15-1.2 
Continued 
The majority leader's point of order seeking immediate transmittal of the bill under 
JR 17 was, in effect, a move to reconsider that earlier decision and was, for that reason, not 
well taken. 
The president ruled, furthermore, that the immediate transmittal option embodied 
in JR 17 was now foreclosed as far as the inspector general bill was concerned because the 
majority leader had not chosen to exercise it immediately after the amended bill passed. 
The ruling was appealed and, on a roll call vote, the president was overruled. 
The majority leader asked if it was in order to move the bill's immediate transmittal to the 
House. 
The president said that no motion was necessary because the Senate had indicated 
by  overruling him that  such  bills  were  to  be  transmitted  automatically. 
Fauliso, June 4, 
1985. 
15-1.3   
RECONSIDERED BILL; EXPIRATION OF TIME TO RECONSIDER 
(
Formerly SP 181
On the last day of the session, a bill was defeated. Later the same day, a senator moved to 
reconsider the vote on the bill. The motion to reconsider carried and then the bill itself passed. A 
senator raised a point of order that SR 10 requires the clerk to retain bills until the one session 
day period for reconsideration had elapsed. Since this bill had been reconsidered and passed on 
the same day as its earlier defeat, the right of reconsideration had expired and the clerk should 
send the bill to the House immediately instead of holding it for another day. 
The president ruled the point well taken. The clerk was required to retain bill until 
the right of reconsideration has expired and no longer. Since SR 26 provides that no bill 
may be reconsidered twice in the same session and the bill had already been reconsidered 
once, the reconsideration time must be deemed expired. The bill must be sent immediately 
to the House. 
Fauliso, May 7, 1986. 
SECTION 16 -- LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY 
16-1.1   
CASE PENDING IN SUPERIOR COURT; VALIDATION OF  
ACTION OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY   (
Formerly HP 184
The bill provided for minimum benefits and improved administration in the state program of 
tax  reductions  for elderly homeowners  and grants for elderly renters.  The  bill  was  amended by 
House amendment "H," which  validated  action regarding the circuit breaker program taken in a 
1986 special session of the General Assembly. A senator raised a point of order that the amendment 
was improper because a case was pending asking the Superior Court to determine if the 1986 law 
was valid and "any matter awaiting adjudication in a court should not be debated or discussed in a 
legislative body" (
Mason
111(3)). 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
create fillable form from pdf; fillable pdf forms
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
auto fill pdf form from excel; create fillable form pdf online
S 77 
LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY ----- 16-1.1 
Continued 
A  second  senator  argued  that  the  matter  awaiting  adjudication  was  whether  the  1986 
special  session  was  properly  and  legally  called.    This  was  not  strictly  the  subject  of  the 
amendment.  House "H" merely sought to validate the action of the General Assembly in 1986 if 
the court determined that the 1986 session was illegal. 
The president ruled the point of order not well taken. 
Fauliso, June 3, 1987. 
SECTION 17 -- PASS RETAIN 
17-1.1    
HOLDING OVER   (
Formerly SP 188
Without  objection,  the  bill  was  pass  retained.  Later  the  same  day,  a  senator  moved 
adoption of the bill. 
The president ruled that a pass retained bill must be held over at least until the next 
session day. 
Ballen, April 17, 1980. 
17-1.2   
MOTION DEBATABLE AND VOTABLE   (
Formerly SP 187
A motion was made to pass retain a bill. A senator objected to the motion and asked to 
comment. 
The president ruled that a motion to pass retain was both debatable and votable if 
objection exists. 
Fauliso, May 5, 1980. 
17-1.3    
MOTION IN ORDER WHEN A QUESTION IS UNDER DEBATE  
(SR 29)   (
Formerly SP 186
A senator raised a point of order as to whether a motion to pass retain could be made 
while an amendment is on the floor. 
The president, citing SR 29, ruled that a motion to pass retain is in order when a 
question is under debate. 
Groark, May 1, 1994. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
best pdf form filler; convert pdf to fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in
create fill pdf form; converting a word document to a fillable pdf form
S 78 
SECTION 18 -- PETITIONS 
18-1.1   
PETITION FOR BILL OUT OF COMMITTEE (JR 19) - EFFECT OF 
PRIOR REPORT OF SPLIT COMMITTEE   (
Formerly SP 190
A senator moved  passage of  a  bill  which  had  been  petitioned  out  of  committee.  The 
House members  of the  committee  had previously reported the bill favorably and  it had been 
passed by the House. A second senator raised the point of order that the bill was not properly 
before the Senate because (1) it had been in possession of the House and not the committee when 
the petition was delivered and (2) after passage by the House, the bill had been referred to the 
committee after its reporting deadline for petitions. 
The president ruled the point well taken, since a bill reported out by one side of a 
split  committee  was  no  longer  in  the  possession  of  the  committee,  and  also  since  the 
reporting deadline established for a bill reported out by one side of a committee, passed by 
one chamber and subsequently referred to committee, was not met. 
The ruling was appealed and sustained. 
Killian, 1978. 
18-1.2   
PETITIONS FOR FULLY DRAFTED BILL REJECTED BY THE  
CLERK (JR 8; 11); APPEALS OF RULINGS NOT  
AUTOMATICALLY DEBATABLE (SR 3)   (
Formerly SP 192
A senator raised a point of order that the Senate clerk had refused to receive and file four 
petitions for fully drafted bills. The senator stated that the petitions complied with the rules. The 
senator asked for a ruling on the clerk's authority to reject petitions. 
The clerk said that the petitions had not reached his office within the required time and 
that he and the Legislative Commissioners' Office felt they were therefore invalid. He returned 
the petitions to their originators without filing them and now had nothing in his possession. 
The  president  ruled  that  since  the  petitions  had  not been  accepted  by  the  clerk, 
there was nothing before the Senate on which he could effectively rule. He noted that the 
rules do not provide for appeal to the Senate president or the full Senate when petitions are 
rejected by the clerk. Similar situations had occurred before and if they were considered a 
problem they could be addressed only through a rules change. He ruled the point not well 
taken. 
The senator moved that the petitions be referred to the Government Administration and 
Elections Committee. 
The president ruled the motion out of order. There was nothing before the body to 
refer because the clerk had rejected the petitions. 
The senator appealed the ruling and asked for debate. The president refused permission 
for debate. 
The  senator  raised  a  point  of  order  that  an  appeal  from  a  president's  ruling,  duly 
seconded, was automatically debatable. 
The president ruled this point not well taken. 
On  a  roll  call,  the  president's  ruling  concerning  the  petition  was  sustained. 
Fauliso, 
March 25, 1981. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
.net fill pdf form; allow users to attach to pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
create a fillable pdf form; pdf create fillable form
S 79 
PETITIONS ----- 
Continued 
18-1.3   
PETITION INACCURATE   (
Formerly SP 191
The petitioned bill received an unfavorable report from the Energy and Public Utilities 
Committee. A senator moved that the committee's unfavorable report be rejected and began to 
explain the bill. Another senator raised a point of order that the bill was improperly before the 
Senate  because  the  petition  circulated  on  its  behalf  did  not  refer  to  a  bill  in  the  Energy 
Committee's possession. The petition was for a proposed substitute bill which had been defeated 
in  committee,  leaving  only  the  original  bill  in  the  committee's  possession  and  available  for 
petitioning out. Though the two bills dealt with the same subject, the substitute (that is, the bill 
the first senator was describing) was substantially different from the original. 
The first senator argued that the petition was in order since the Senate clerk had crossed 
out the words "proposed substitute" when he received it, and none of the senators signing the 
petition inquired as to the difference between the original and substitute bills. Thus, despite the 
technical error, the petition could still be said to express the wishes of two-thirds of the Senate as 
required by the rules. 
The president ruled the point of order well taken. When the petition was circulated 
and  signed,  it  referred  to  a  proposed  substitute  bill  which  was  not  in  the  committee's 
possession and could not therefore be petitioned. The change made in the clerk's office was 
not enough to remedy the inaccuracy. It  was very important that petitions be absolutely 
accurate when they are circulated so members know what they are signing. 
The  first  senator  appealed  the  ruling,  but  on  a  roll  call,  the  president  was  sustained. 
Fauliso, April 21, 1982. 
SECTION 19 -- POINT OF ORDER 
19-1.1   
UNFAVORABLE REPORT   (
Formerly SP 197
The bill  received an unfavorable  report from the Transportation  Committee. A senator 
moved to overturn the unfavorable report. A second senator raised a point of order that the bill 
was improper because it contained a $30,000 appropriation not approved by the Appropriations 
Committee. 
The  president  ruled  the  point  not  well  taken.  Because  the  bill  had  received  an 
unfavorable report, it was not technically before the chamber until the unfavorable report 
was overturned, if it was. 
O'Neill, June 1, 1979. 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; create a pdf with fields to fill in
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
converting pdf to fillable form; pdf fillable forms
S 80 
POINT OF ORDER ----- 
Continued 
19-1.2    
MOTION TO PASS TEMPORARILY AND POINT OF ORDER (SR 3) 
(
Formerly SP 195
The  bill  concerned  a  motor  vehicle  emissions  inspections  program.  The  amendment 
removed a  provision  in  the  bill requiring the state to  bear  the  costs of  the program  over and 
above  income  from  inspection  fees.  A  senator  raised  a  point  of  order  with  respect  to  the 
unamended bill; that, in adding a provision for a legislative committee to approve or reject the 
proposed  inspection  agreement  between  the  state  and  the  contractor,  the  Appropriations 
Committee had exceeded its powers and substantively altered the bill. 
A second senator moved to pass the bill temporarily. 
The acting president ruled that the motion to pass temporarily could not be made 
until the point of order was disposed of. 
Prete, April 28, 1980. 
19-1.3    
POINT OF ORDER RAISED DURING TECHNICAL SESSION;  
GERMANENESS   (
Formerly SP 196
During a session held to advance the calendar, a senator moved that items on the Senate 
agenda be acted upon as indicated. The agenda included two favorable reports to be read for the 
second time and tabled for the calendar and printing. Another senator raised a point of order that 
one of these bills was not germane to the subject of the special session. 
The  president  pro  tempore  ruled  that  the  point  of  order,  although  technically 
timely, must be held in abeyance until a regular session when the entire Senate was present 
and could discuss the bill's germaneness. In the meantime, he allowed the bill to be read a 
second  time, printed  and put  on the calendar. He also stated that  no ruling against  the 
senator's point would be made solely on the grounds that it was not timely raised. 
Murphy, 
December 21, 1981. 
19-1.4   
POINT OF ORDER NOT TIMELY   (
Formerly SP 194
The  Senate  passed a  bill on  the last day  of  the session.  After intervening  business,  a 
senator  raised  a  point  of  order  that  action  on  the  bill  was  improper.  The  bill  had  not  been 
properly before the Senate, he said, because the House, which acted on the bill earlier in the day, 
had not suspended the rules  for  immediate  transmittal.  A  second senator argued  that the first 
senator's point of order was improper because it was not raised before the irregularity or occasion 
for the point of order had passed. On procedural questions, it is too late as soon as the particular 
point has been passed or the next business taken up (
Mason 
241(1)).
The president ruled the point of order was not timely. 
Fauliso, June 3, 1987. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert pdf to fill in form; convert pdf fillable forms
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert pdf fillable form to word; fillable pdf forms
S 81 
POINT OF ORDER ----- 
Continued 
19-1.5    
POINT OF ORDER NOT TIMELY DURING ROLL CALL VOTE 
(
Formerly SP 193
The emergency certified bill banned the sale of specified assault weapons. It passed the 
House with 10 House amendments. The proponent moved to pass the bill in concurrence with the 
House. Another senator moved that the Senate vote separately on each House amendment. The 
proponent opposed the motion and the president called for a roll call vote. A senator raised a 
point of order that, under Senate precedent, no vote was required and that any senator could ask 
to have House amendments adopted separately. Another senator raised a point of order that the 
first senator's point was not proper because a roll call vote was in progress. 
The president ruled the second point well taken. Points of order could not interrupt 
a roll call vote. Once the president had called for the vote and the machine was open, no 
point of order as to the appropriateness of taking the vote can be raised until the vote is 
finished (
Mason
241(1)). 
Groark, June 8, 1993. 
SECTION 20 -- POINT OF PERSONAL PRIVILEGE 
20-1.1   
CONTENT OF   (
Formerly SP 189
A senator rose for a point of personal privilege. He inquired through the chair whether the 
majority  leader  would  call  the  Senate into  session  to  allow  a  vote  on  a  bill  to  cut  the  state 
gasoline tax rate as of April 1 as the governor had proposed. The majority leader replied that the 
gas  tax reduction was not before the Senate  and that the Senate's meeting dates depended on 
available legislation. The senator then asked the Finance Committee's ranking member whether 
the committee was considering any bill to reduce the gas tax that could be reported out within 
two  weeks.  The  ranking  member  said  that  there  were  two  such  bills  and,  since  the  Finance 
Committee was scheduled to meet three times in the coming two weeks, it could vote on the bills 
at those meetings. The first senator then asked that, given that there was no assurance that the 
full Senate would have a chance to vote on before April 1st, that the gas tax reduction bill be 
emergency certified. 
The  Senate  president  pro  tempore  rose  and  asked  the  president  to  intervene  and  say 
whether the senator's questions  to  other senators  and  discussion  about the  gas  tax bills  were 
proper given that he rose to speak on a point of personal privilege. 
The president said that points of personal privilege were just that. Inquiries were 
appropriate but senators are not permitted to question how other senators feel or how they 
want to or wish to vote or not vote. 
Rell, March 13, 1998. 
S 82 
SECTION 21 -- PUBLIC HEARING 
21-1.1    
PETITIONED BILL (JR 8; 9)   (
Formerly SP 198
The bill prohibited the use of steel-jawed leg hold traps in the state. On a roll call vote, the 
Environment Committee's unfavorable report was overturned. A senator raised a point of order that 
the bill was not properly before the Senate because it had no public hearing. 
The president ruled the point not well taken. Public hearings were not required for 
unfavorable reports because if public hearings had to be held on petitioned bills, committee 
chairmen could circumvent the petition process simply by never holding a hearing on the 
bill. 
O'Neill, April 22, 1980. 
21-1.2   
SUBSTITUTE BILL; GERMANENESS   (
Formerly SP 199
The substitute bill increased several state taxes effective April 1. A senator raised a point 
of order that it was improperly before the Senate because it had not had a public hearing and was 
not germane to the subject of the original bill on which the hearing was held. The original house 
bill had placed a statutory limit on the state's total bonded indebtedness. That bill had a hearing 
and the substitute had been reported out four days later. The substitute was not germane to the 
original so there should have been a second hearing (JR 15; 
Mason
402). 
The  bill's  proponent  argued  that,  traditionally,  substitute  bills  are  never  given  new 
hearings and that the original bill dealt with taxation. 
The president ruled the point not well taken because the substitute was germane to 
the original. 
The ruling was appealed and sustained. 
Fauliso, March 31, 1983. 
SECTION 22 -- QUORUM 
22-1.1   
QUORUM PRESENT   (
Formerly SP 200
A senator requested the president to rule on  the presence of a quorum, there being 18 
senators in the chamber and the president in the chair. 
The president ruled a quorum was present, although he was in the chair and not 
voting. 
Doocy, February 1965. 
S 83 
SECTION 23 -- RECESS 
23-1.1   
RECESS DURING VOTE   (
Formerly SP 201
While a rising vote was being counted, a senator moved for a recess. A second senator 
rose to  a point of order that  no motion  for  a recess could be entertained while a vote was in 
progress. 
The president ruled the point well taken. 
Shephard, 1941. 
SECTION 24 -- RECOMMITTAL 
24-1.1   
DEBATABLE MOTION   (
Formerly SP 204
A senator requested a ruling on whether a motion to recommit was debatable. 
The president ruled that it was. 
Doocy, 1963. 
24-1.2   
BUDGET BILL   (
Formerly SP 203
The president ruled that an amendment to the revenue projections in the budget bill was 
out of order. The ruling was appealed and sustained. A senator moved to recommit the bill to the 
Finance,  Revenue  and  Bonding  Committee  so  that  committee  could  revise  the  revenue 
projections  on  which the  budget  was  based.  Another  senator  raised  a  point  of  order  that  the 
motion to recommit was out of order as the budget bill had been reported out of Appropriations 
and had never been to the Finance Committee. 
The president ruled the point well taken and the motion out of order. 
The  first  senator  changed  his  motion  to  a  motion  to  refer  the  bill  to  the  Finance 
Committee. 
Fauliso, May 19, 1987. 
24-1.3   
DEBATE ON, CONDUCT OF   (
Formerly SP 202
A senator moved to recommit a bill. Another senator objected and stated his reasons. A 
third senator said that the opponent of the motion did not understand the bill and that, rather than 
reading  the  bill  himself,  he  was  taking  his  cue  from  the  ranking  member  of  the  Finance 
Committee. 
The president ruled that the motion to recommit was debatable only with respect the 
appropriateness of the recommittal. The main question was not open for debate. In addition, 
he cautioned senators to discuss the issue and avoid personalities. 
The third  senator argued that  he had  not  engaged in personalities  but  merely reported 
what was happening on the Senate floor. 
The president reiterated that it was improper debate to cast aspersions on a senator 
for conferring with a colleague. He again asked all senators to confine their remarks to the 
motion to recommit. 
Fauliso, May 21, 1987. 
S 84 
RECOMMITTAL ----- 
Continued 
24-1.4   
FINAL ACTION; REINTRODUCTION OF SAME ISSUE IN  
AMENDMENT IS OUT OF ORDER   (
Formerly SP 205
The bill concerned penalties for the sale or possession of controlled substances and for 
money laundering. A senator introduced Senate "A," an amendment to the death penalty statute 
that was identical to a bill the Senate had recommitted to the Judiciary Committee earlier in the 
session. A senator raised a point of order that the amendment was improper because the Senate 
had  taken  final  action  on  the  issue  by  voting  to  recommit  the  earlier  death  penalty  bill  to 
Judiciary after that committee's reporting deadline. Under Senate rules, no question that has been 
finally disposed of may be brought before the Senate again in the same session (
Mason
65).  
The amendment's proponents argued that the earlier vote to recommit the bill had been a 
procedural  action  and  that  the  substance  of  the  amendment  had  not  been  finally  decided. 
Therefore, it was permissible to introduce it as an amendment. 
The  president  pro  tempore  ruled  the  point  well  taken.  Under  the  rules, 
recommitting a bill to committee after its reporting deadline was final action. Therefore, 
Senate "A" was out of order. 
The ruling was appealed and sustained. 
Larson, May 26, 1987. 
SECTION 25 -- RECONSIDERATION 
25-1.1    
RECONSIDER TWICE (SR 26)   (
Formerly SP 220
A senator pointed out that, a motion to reconsider the bill having been previously acted 
upon,  a second  motion  to  reconsider  the  same bill could not be  entertained under the Senate 
rules. 
The president gave his opinion that, the bill having been reconsidered once, another 
motion to reconsider it could not be entertained unless there was an appreciable change in 
the bill between the two motions. 
Shepard, 1941. 
25-1.2    
RECONSIDER AFTER CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT (SR 26) 
(
Formerly SP 219
A bill had been passed by the Senate with three amendments. The House had passed one 
of  the  amendments,  but  had  rejected  the  other  two.  The  Senate  insisted  on  these  two 
amendments. After a  conference committee, a senator moved that one  of  the amendments  be 
reconsidered. Another senator inquired whether the motion constituted a second reconsideration 
of the amendment, contrary to the rules. 
The president ruled that the motion to reconsider was in order in that the action 
taken  by  the  Senate  in  insisting  on  its  amendments  did  not  constitute  a  first 
reconsideration. 
Killian, 1978. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested