c# convert pdf to image : Create fill pdf form SDK software service wpf winforms asp.net dnn rulesprecedents14-part1924

S 85 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 
Continued 
25-1.3    
REINTRODUCTION PROPER WHERE AMENDMENT  
WITHDRAWN BEFORE SECOND VOTE (SR 26)   (
Formerly SP 83
•  
SEE ALSO
 
AMENDMENTS, SUBSTANTIVE 
The  bill  allowed  towns  to  choose  whether  to  count  votes  cast  for  an  unsuccessful 
candidate  for  first selectman  in  the  candidate's  total  vote  for the  office  of  selectman.  Senate 
amendment "A"  required  a  uniform  statewide  municipal election  date. After  Senate "A"  was 
adopted, its proponent moved to reconsider; a motion which was also adopted. The proponent 
then  withdrew  Senate  "A"  and  offered  Senate  "B."  Senate  "B"  also  provided  for  uniform 
municipal election dates. After a short debate, the bill was pass retained, carrying the proposed 
Senate "B" with it. 
Two days later, consideration of Senate "B" was resumed. A senator requested a ruling on 
whether Senate "B" was substantive. 
The president pro tempore ruled that the amendment was substantive and if it were 
adopted, the bill would be returned to the legislative commissioners for reprinting. 
Senate "B" was adopted and ruled substantive. 
A short time later, a motion to reconsider Senate "B" was made and adopted, whereupon 
the bill and the amendment were once again pass retained. 
The Senate resumed  consideration of the bill  four  days later. The proponent withdrew 
Senate "B" and reintroduced Senate "A." A senator raised a point of order that as Senate "A" had 
been  passed,  reconsidered,  and  withdrawn  earlier,  reintroduction  constituted  a  second 
reconsideration and was not in order. 
The  president  ruled  the  point  not  well  taken  because  Senate  "A"  was  never 
reconsidered  in  substance.  It  had been withdrawn before being voted  on a  second  time. 
Therefore reintroduction was proper.  
Another senator raised a point of order that Senate "A" could not be reintroduced because 
it would involve a second vote on a main question (
Mason
159(1)). 
The president ruled that this point was essentially the same as the previous one. He 
restated his ruling that Senate "A" could be reintroduced because it had been withdrawn 
prior to a second vote on the previous occasion (
Mason
468(1), 276). 
A senator appealed the ruling. Limited debate was invited. On a roll call vote, the ruling 
was sustained. 
Fauliso, May 24, 1979 and O'Neill, May 29, 1979.
25-1.4   
RECONSIDER, APPLICABILITY OF MOTION TO (SR 26);  
RECOMMIT, PRECEDENCE OF MOTION TO   (
Formerly SP 218
The bill was amended twice by the Senate and once by the House. Upon the bill's being 
called again in the Senate, a motion to pass the bill in concurrence with the House was made. On 
a voice vote the bill passed. After intervening business, a senator moved to reconsider the bill. 
The president ruled that the only item which could be reconsidered was House "A," 
passed earlier that day. Adoption of House "A" had automatically caused the bill to pass. 
The bill itself had not been acted on. 
Create fill pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
change font size in pdf fillable form; best pdf form filler
Create fill pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf to fillable form; pdf add signature field
S 86 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 25-1.4 
Continued 
A second senator moved to recommit the bill to committee. A senator raised a point of 
order that  the  motion  to  recommit  was  not  proper as a  motion  to  reconsider  House "A" was 
already on the floor. 
The president ruled that the motion to recommit took precedence. 
On a roll call, the motion to recommit failed. 
The first senator withdrew his motion to reconsider House "A." 
The president ruled that the withdrawal of the motion to reconsider meant the bill 
stood as passed. 
The second senator then moved to reconsider House "A." On a roll call vote, the motion 
was defeated. 
O'Neill, May 5, 1980. 
25-1.5   
PREVAILING SIDE (SR 26); EXPLAINING VOTE   (
Formerly SP 217
On a roll call vote, Senate amendment "N" failed. On a later roll call, the bill was passed. 
After intervening business, a senator rose to state that he had inadvertently voted against Senate 
"N" and asked to change his vote. 
The  president  ruled  that  no  changes  in  votes  can  be  made  after  the  vote  is 
announced  (
Mason
535(6)).  If  the  senator  wished  to  correct  his  vote,  he  must  move 
reconsideration. 
The senator, being on the prevailing side (albeit by mistake), moved to reconsider Senate 
"N." 
Another senator raised a point of order that, because the bill itself had already passed, a 
motion to reconsider the whole bill rather than just Senate "N" was required.  
The first senator could not, however, move to reconsider the bill because, having voted to 
defeat it, he was not on the prevailing side (SR 26). 
The president ruled the point well taken. He suggested that the senator explain the 
inadvertence  of  his  "no"  vote  and  ordered  the  Journal  to  note  his  explanation  (
Mason
528(1)). 
Fauliso, April 29, 1981. 
25-1.6    
RECONSIDER ON THE SAME SESSION DAY (SR 26; JR 5)  
(
Formerly SP 216
A senator moved to reconsider action on a bill taken earlier in the day. Another senator 
inquired whether reconsideration on the same session day as the original action was proper under 
the Joint Rules. 
The  president  ruled  that  the  motion  was  in  order  and  that  the  rule  concerning 
reconsideration on the next day applied only to committees. 
Fauliso, May 5, 1981. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password passwordSetting. IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. True ' Add password to PDF file.
create fill pdf form; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
create fill in pdf forms; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
S 87 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 
Continued 
25-1.7   
RECONSIDER PASS RETAINED BILL (SR 26)   (
Formerly SP 215
On  a  roll  call,  an  amendment  was  adopted.  A  senator  then  moved  to  reconsider  the 
amendment but later withdrew that motion. A motion to pass retain the amended bill was made 
and accepted. After intervening business, the senator again moved to reconsider the amendment. 
A senator raised a point of order that the motion to reconsider was not in order since the 
bill had been pass retained and could not be taken up until the next session day at the earliest. 
The president pro tempore ruled that, notwithstanding the earlier pass retaining of 
the bill, the motion to reconsider was in order because it had been made within the time 
limit for reconsideration. 
Murphy, May 21, 1981. 
25-1.8    
BILL TRANSMITTED TO OTHER HOUSE IN ERROR (SR 10)  
(
Formerly SP 214
The bill was passed by the House and sent to the Senate. It was taken up by the Senate on 
the next  to last day  of the  session when an amendment  (Senate  "A") was adopted.  The bill, as 
amended by Senate "A," was passed. The amended bill was sent back to the House at the end of the 
day. The House took it up the next day (the last of the session). 
While the bill was being debated in the House, a senator raised a point of order that the 
bill should not have been sent to the House at the end of the previous day, but should rather have 
been held by the Senate clerk until the time limit for reconsideration in the Senate had passed. 
That time limit does not expire until the end of the session day after the bill passes unless the 
rules are suspended for immediate transmittal, which had not occurred in this case. 
The president ruled the point well taken. He directed the Senate clerk to inform the 
House clerk that the bill was not properly before the House and that any action taken by 
the House on the bill was invalid and void. He asked that the bill be returned to the Senate. 
The speaker of the House refused to return the bill to the Senate on the grounds that the 
House had already taken it up and it was beyond the power of the Senate president to rule on 
whether bills were properly or improperly before the House. 
The bill passed the House and was later signed by the governor. 
Fauliso, May 5, 1982. 
25-1.9   
RECONSIDER AMENDMENT   (
Formerly SP 213
The  bill  concerned  liquor  stores  that  wished  to  move  to  other  locations.  The  Senate 
passed  the  bill  with  one  amendment,  Senate  "A."  Later,  it  accepted  a  motion  to  reconsider 
passage, and following reconsideration, pass retained the bill. When it was called again on the 
next session day, a senator moved to reject Senate "A." Another senator raised a point of order 
that the correct procedure was to introduce a new amendment to delete Senate "A." 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a password passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. Add password to PDF file.
acrobat fill in pdf forms; convert word form to fillable pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
pdf fillable form creator; create fillable forms in pdf
S 88 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 25-1.9 
Continued 
The president pro tempore ruled that the motion to reject Senate "A" was not in 
order. Since the bill itself was reconsidered, the proper motion to accomplish deletion of 
Senate "A" was to reconsider, and then reject, Senate "A." 
On a roll call vote, Senate "A" was reconsidered and later defeated. A senator moved to 
pass retain the bill. That motion was defeated on a voice vote. Another senator then moved to 
reconsider the bill and asked his colleagues to defeat the motion. 
The president pro tempore ruled the motion out of order because a bill can only be 
reconsidered once under SR 26. 
Robertson, May 15, 1985. 
25-1.10   
RECONSIDER MOTION TO SUSPEND RULES; REFERRAL TO  
FINANCE   (
Formerly SP 212
The  bill  changed  the  license  fee  for  distributors  selling  cigarettes  exclusively  from 
vending  machines. A senator introduced an amendment (Senate "A")  to exempt  sales of milk 
from vending machines from the sales tax. Senate "A" was adopted. A senator introduced Senate 
"B," a technical amendment, which was adopted by a voice vote. 
Another senator moved to refer the bill to the Finance Committee because of the potential 
revenue loss occasioned by the adoption of Senate "A." The proponent of Senate "A" moved to 
suspend the rules to dispense with the reference to Finance. The motion to suspend the rules was 
defeated on a roll call vote. The senator renewed his motion to refer the amended bill to Finance. 
Another senator moved to reconsider the motion to suspend the rules. 
The acting president ruled  the motion out  of order. Motions  to suspend the rules 
may not be reconsidered or renewed for the same purpose on the same day unless other 
business has intervened or the parliamentary situation has changed (
Mason
283, 6). 
The motion to refer the bill to Finance was defeated on a roll call vote. The proponent 
then moved to place the bill on the consent calendar. A senator raised a point of order that the 
bill was not properly before the Senate because it had not been to the Finance Committee even 
though, by virtue of Senate "A," it would cost the state revenue. 
The acting president ruled the point not  well taken because the  issue of reference to 
Finance had been decided when the Senate defeated the earlier motion to refer. 
A senator objected to  transferring the bill to consent. On a  roll call  vote, the bill was 
adopted. The majority leader moved to reconsider the bill. The motion was adopted. The item 
was then passed  temporarily  and, later, on  the committee chairman's  motion,  was  referred  to 
Finance. 
Markley, May 29, 1985. 
25-1.11    
TIME LIMIT FOR   (
Formerly SP 211
A senator moved to reconsider a judicial nomination defeated the previous day.  Another 
senator moved to adjourn. The first senator inquired whether, if the motion to adjourn carried, his 
motion to reconsider could be brought up the following day. 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
change font in pdf fillable form; convert word document to pdf fillable form
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
convert excel to fillable pdf form; create fillable form from pdf
S 89 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 25-1.11 
Continued 
The president ruled that it could not be brought up the following day because the 
rules  allow  for  reconsideration  of  a  question  only  on  the  same  session  day  or  the  one 
immediately  following.  The  time  limit  for  reconsidering  the  judicial  nomination  would 
expire on adjournment. 
Fauliso, April 29, 1986. 
25-1.12    
RECONSIDER A MOTION TO REFER; SENATOR PRESENT  
FAILS TO VOTE; REFERRAL TO APPROPRIATIONS 
(
Formerly SP 210
A Labor Committee bill that had been pass retained was called and Senate amendment 
"A"  was  proposed.  Senate  "A"  changed  the  bill's  effective  date  in  order  to  defer  the  costs 
estimated in the fiscal note to the 1987-88 fiscal year. On a roll call vote, the amendment was 
defeated. A senator moved to refer the bill to the Appropriations Committee because of the fiscal 
note. A senator raised a point of order that the motion to refer was not proper because the Senate 
had defeated the same motion the day before by a vote of 18 to 15. 
The president ruled the point well taken. 
A  senator  then  moved  to  reconsider  the  previous  day's  vote  not  to  refer  the  bill  to 
Appropriations, saying he had been on the prevailing side of that vote. A senator raised a point of 
order that procedural motions, such as motions to refer, are not subject to reconsideration (
Mason
456). 
The president ruled that  SR 26 allows any vote, except a motion  to adjourn  or a 
motion for the previous question, to be reconsidered on the day of the vote or on the next 
session day. The Senate rules take precedence over 
Mason
, so the point was not well taken. 
On a roll call vote the motion to reconsider the question of referral to Appropriations was 
adopted. On a second roll call, the motion to refer was defeated by a vote of 17 to 16. A senator 
raised a point of order that one senator was present in the chamber and failed to vote. 
The  president  ruled  the  point  not  well  taken  as  the  result  had  already  been 
announced. 
A senator raised a point of order that the bill must be sent to Appropriations because the 
motion to refer was not defeated by at least a two-thirds vote. 
The president ruled the point not well taken. The Joint Rules require that any bill 
carrying  or  requiring  appropriations  must  be  referred  to  Appropriations  "unless  such 
reference is dispensed with by a vote of at least two-thirds vote of each house" (JR 3(A)(1)). 
Fauliso, April 30, 1986. 
25-1.13    
RECONSIDER A MOTION TO RECOMMIT   (
Formerly SP 209
A senator moved  to  reconsider the  Senate's  earlier  decision  to recommit  a  bill  to  the 
Judiciary  Committee.  A  senator  raised  a  point  of  order  that  a  motion  to  refer  a  matter  to 
committee may not be reconsidered (
Mason
390). 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; create pdf fill in form
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
convert pdf fillable form; adding signature to pdf form
S 90 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 25-1.13 
Continued 
The president ruled that the motion was in order because SR 26 allows any vote to 
be reconsidered within one session day provided the bill is still in the Senate's possession. 
Senate  rules  take  precedence  over 
Mason
,  but  even 
Mason 
allows  a  motion  to  refer  to 
committee to be withdrawn (
Mason
390(2)) and this motion to reconsider would have the 
same effect as a motion to withdraw. 
Fauliso, April 30, 1986. 
25-1.14    
RECONSIDER BILL THAT FAILED ON TIE VOTE    (
Formerly SP 208
A senator moved to reconsider a bill that had been defeated on a tie vote. He stated that 
he was on the prevailing side. Another senator contended the motion was out of order since on a 
tie vote neither side prevails. 
The president ruled the point not well taken. Since a tie vote means that a bill fails 
to pass, any senator who voted against it can be said to have prevailed. The senator had 
voted against the bill on the previous vote and was thus allowed to move reconsideration 
under the rules. 
Fauliso, May 7, 1986. 
25-1.15    
NO PREVAILING SIDE IN STANDING VOTE   (
Formerly SP 207
An amendment was adopted by a standing vote. The bill as amended was then adopted by 
a  roll call  vote.  Later the same  day, a  senator  moved  to  reconsider  the  bill.  The motion  was 
adopted. Another senator then moved to reconsider the amendment. A third senator raised a point 
of order that the motion was improper because the amendment had been adopted by a standing 
vote and, unlike a roll call, there was no record of which senators were on the prevailing side. 
The rules require a senator to be on the prevailing side to move reconsideration. 
The president ruled the point not well taken and that the senator could make the 
motion. 
Fauliso, June 3, 1987. 
25-1.16  
LIMITED DEBATE ALLOWED ON MOTION   (
Formerly SP 206
The bill established a waiting period between purchase and delivery of certain firearms. 
The Senate adopted Senate amendment "A" and the bill was then passed retaining its place on 
the calendar. When the amended bill was called again on the next session day, a senator who had 
voted for  Senate  "A"  moved to  reconsider  its  adoption.  After  some  debate  on  the  motion,  a 
senator  raised a point  of order  that both  the  proponent and  opponent  were going beyond the 
procedural issue of reconsideration and discussing the merits of the amendment. 
The president ruled that a  motion to reconsider was  open to  debate but that the 
debate  must be  confined to  the  question before  the  chamber.  Since  the  issue before the 
Senate  was a motion  to reconsider Senate "A,"  debate was  limited to  that issue  (
Mason
101(1)). 
Fauliso, May 1, 1990. 
S 91 
RECONSIDERATION ----- 
Continued 
25-1.17 
RECONSIDER AMENDMENT 
A senator called an amendment and, after its adoption, attempted to withdraw it, stating 
he  had  mistakenly  called  the  wrong  amendment.  The  president  called  for  a  voice  vote  to 
withdraw the amendment. 
The majority leader noted the procedure to remove the amendment just adopted would be 
a motion to reconsider the amendment by someone on the prevailing side; the amendment could 
then be rejected on the reconsideration motion and a different amendment considered. 
The senator asked for reconsideration of the amendment and the president called for a 
voice vote  on the motion. After  the  vote was  taken,  the president  called for  a voice  vote  on 
rejection  of  the  amendment  just  adopted.  The  amendment  was  rejected  and  the  correct 
amendment was called and adopted. 
Wyman, May 31, 2013. 
SECTION 26 -- REFER, MOTION TO 
26-1.1   
TIMELINESS OF MOTION TO REFER   (
Formerly SP 224
The bill concerned the right to a natural death and the ramifications of "living wills." It 
received a favorable report from the Judiciary Committee. When the bill was taken up, a senator 
raised a point of order that it was improperly before the Senate because it had not been referred 
to  the  Public  Health  Committee.  In  past  sessions,  similar  bills  had  been  sent  first  to  Public 
Health. 
The president ruled the point not well taken on the grounds that the objection was 
not timely. Objections to committee references must be made at the time a bill has its first 
reading. 
Fauliso, April 19, 1982. 
26-1.2   
TIMELINESS OF MOTION TO REFER   (
Formerly SP 223
The  bill  allowed former  prisoners  of war  to  have  special  license  plates.  It  received  a 
favorable report from the Appropriations Committee. A senator raised a point of order that the 
bill  was  improper  because  it  had  not  been  to  the  Transportation  Committee,  which  has 
jurisdiction over matters relating to the Motor Vehicle Department. 
The president ruled the point not well taken because it was untimely. Citing a ruling 
made earlier in the session, he stated that objections to committee references must be made 
at the time of a bill's first reading. 
Fauliso, April 26, 1982. 
S 92 
REFER, MOTION TO ----- 
Continued 
26-1.3   
TIMELINESS OF MOTION TO REFER   (
Formerly SP 222
The bill eliminated the Alcohol Education and Treatment Fund and transferred the money 
to the General Fund.  House amendment "B" raised the drinking age to 20. A senator raised a 
point of order that the bill as amended by the House was improperly before the Senate because it 
had not been referred to the General Law Committee and he moved to refer it there. 
The president pro tempore ruled the point not well taken because it was not timely. 
The senator had previous opportunities to raise the jurisdictional issue and had not done 
so. Under the circumstances, the motion to refer to General Law was dilatory. 
Murphy, June 
6, 1983. 
26-1.4   
EFFECT OF REFERRAL TO PRIOR COMMITTEE    (
Formerly SP 221
Several amendments were added to a bill reported out of the Planning and Development 
Committee. A senator moved to refer the amended bill to Planning and Development. A second 
senator asked the president pro tempore whether the effect of adopting the motion would be to 
recommit the bill. 
The  president  pro  tempore  ruled  that  a  bill  may  be  referred  back  to  committee 
when  numerous  amendments  are  proposed  or  substantial  revision  is  required  (
Mason
384(3)). Such a referral is not the same a recommittal and the bill may come back to the 
floor. 
Larson, April 29, 1988.
SECTION 27 -- REGULATIONS 
27-1.1     
REGULATIONS IMPROPERLY BEFORE THE SENATE  
(CGS §§ 4-170 to 4-171)   (
Formerly SP 251
The  resolution  sought  to  reverse  the  vote  of  disapproval  by  the  Joint  Legislative 
Regulation Review Committee of regulations implementing the racial imbalance law. 
In arguing against the resolution, a senator stated that the regulations referred to in the 
resolution were a revised version of an earlier set of regulations disapproved by the Regulation 
Review  Committee  as  exceeding  statutory  authority.  Under  the  Uniform  Administrative 
Procedure Act, the senator argued, the matter should then have been submitted to the General 
Assembly  through  the  Education  Committee.  The  General  Assembly  could  overrule  the 
Regulation Review Committee's rejection in the session following that action. Until the General 
Assembly took action, the executive agency was prohibited from promulgating the disapproved 
regulations in the same or revised form. 
However, prior to the session, the State Department of Education submitted a second set 
of regulations, which it said were new, to implement the racial imbalance law.
S 93 
REGULATIONS ----- 27-1.1 
Continued 
The  Regulation  Review  Committee  at  first  refused  to  accept  and  then,  upon  further 
consideration, disapproved this second set of regulations on the basis that the department had no 
authority to submit them. This second, disapproved set of regulations were then taken up by the 
Education Committee, which had proposed the pending resolution  to  overturn the  Regulation 
Review Committee's action on them. 
Another  senator  raised  a  point  of  order,  based  on  this  summary  of  events,  that  the 
resolution  was  not  properly  before  the  Senate.  The  point  was  withdrawn  prior  to  a  ruling; 
however, upon the failure of a motion to recommit the resolution to the Education Committee, it 
was raised again. 
The president ruled the point not well taken. The ruling made the following points: 
(1) The first set of regulations was submitted to, and rejected by, Regulation Review and 
then  properly  referred  to  the  Education  Committee;  (2)  The  State  Department  of 
Education  drafted  a  second  set  of  regulations  which  were  also  presented  to  Regulation 
Review; (3) Regulation  Review  at first refused to accept  the  second set, but, afraid that 
without definite action  they  would go  into  effect automatically, later  reversed  itself  and 
accepted them for consideration; (4) If Regulation Review had not accepted and considered 
the second set of regulations, the president ruled that the department could have done no 
more  and  the  first  set  of  regulations  could  have  been  acted  upon  by  the  Education 
Committee  if it chose; (5) Because  Regulation Review decided to  vote  to disapprove the 
second set of regulations, the entire disapproval mechanism as it applied to the first set was 
also triggered for the second set. Thus, the second set was referred to Education as well; (6) 
Whether  the  department  had  the  authority  to  redraft  the  regulations  after  the  first 
disapproval was doubtful, but Regulation Review's vote to consider them, in effect, ratified 
the department's action; (7) Therefore, the second set of regulations had been properly sent 
to Education, and the pending resolution reported by that committee was properly before 
the Senate. 
The ruling was appealed and, on a roll call vote, sustained. 
O'Neill, March 5, 1980. 
SECTION 28 -- REJECTION 
28-1.1   
DEFEAT OF MOTION TO REJECT AMENDMENT NOT THE  
SAME AS ADOPTION   (
Formerly SP 252
The  bill  prohibited  commerce  in  construction  materials  containing  asbestos  without 
labeling as to the contents and health hazards.  House amendment "B" prohibited the installation, 
after  October  1,  1980,  of  asbestos  cement  pipe  in  water  supply  systems  until  the  health 
commissioner determined that the use of such pipe presented no hazard. 
A senator  moved  rejection of  House "B." The  motion failed. The senator then moved 
Senate "A." 
The  acting  president  ruled  the motion  out  of order  because House  "B"  was  still 
pending. 
Casey, May 1, 1980. 
S 94 
SECTION 29 -- RESOLUTIONS 
29-1.1    
INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTION; DEBATE, CONDUCT OF  
(
Formerly SP 253
The majority leader moved that all items on Senate Agenda Number 1 be acted on as indicated 
and that the agenda be incorporated by reference into the journal and the transcript for that day. The 
minority leader said he had two agendas numbered 1. The only difference between them was that one 
did not list a Senate joint resolution asking Congress to protect certain student loan programs. He 
asked which agenda the majority leader was moving. The majority leader said he was moving the 
agenda without the resolution. He said the resolution was inappropriately listed on the other agenda, 
and that agenda had been prepared by mistake. 
The minority leader raised a point of order that the resolution was properly on the agenda. The 
Senate order of business listed introduction of bills and resolutions third (SR 19). The Senate could 
thus take up the resolution in its proper order. The majority leader replied that the proper procedure 
was to refer all resolutions to the Government Administration and Elections Committee and to wait 
for that committee's report before the Senate took action. The Senate clerk said that when he included 
the resolution on the agenda, he thought it had been cleared by leaders from both sides. Later he found 
it had not and removed it. 
The minority  leader said that  the  rules do not allow the clerk the latitude to withhold 
resolutions at his own discretion and pressed his point of order. 
The  president  ruled  the  point  not  well  taken.  He  said  the  normal  procedure  to 
introduce  a  resolution  is  to  submit  it  to  the  clerk.  It  then  goes  through  the  clerk's 
computers and duly appears on the Senate agenda for its first reading. The proper motion 
at that time is to refer it to a committee of cognizance unless there is suspension of the rules 
to take it up immediately. The only way to move a resolution to the agenda faster is to get 
clearance from leadership. The student loan resolution  did  not get clearance and  so the 
regular procedure had to be followed. The resolution was not on the agenda yet because it 
was still in the computer. 
The  minority  leader  moved  for  a  suspension  of  the  rules  to  take  the  matter  up 
immediately. 
The president ruled that the resolution, being still in the computer stage, was not yet 
before the Senate. The only way a suspension could be allowed was if the resolution had been 
circulated to senators and there was no objection to taking it up. 
The  minority  leader  said  that  the  resolution  was  in  the  possession  of  the  clerk  and  was 
circulated to the Senate leadership two days before. He renewed his request for suspension. 
The president ruled that the motion to suspend the rules was in order. 
The majority leader objected to suspension. The minority leader asked for a roll call. He 
asked to debate his motion and began to discuss the threat of proposed federal cuts in the student 
loan program.  A senator  raised  a point  of  order that  these  remarks  were  not  germane  to  the 
motion. 
The president ruled the point well taken.  The  motion to  suspend the rules was a 
very narrow one and he urged the Senate to move along and decide the issue. 
On a roll call vote, the motion to suspend the rules was defeated. 
Fauliso, February 6, 
1985. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested