c# convert pdf to image : Change font size in fillable pdf form application Library tool html asp.net .net online sampling1-part1982

Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
2 000
4 000
6 000
8 000
1 000
3 000
5 000
7 000
0
1
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.9
frequency, Hz
relative amplitude
Figure 7: Sampling with a sharper filter.
to see. The situation does improve as the filter order gets higher, but you’d have to go to a
3500 pole filter to get a signal to alias ratio greater than 40dB. Clearly this is an absurdly
large filter to realize in analog hardware.
What is wrong here? The biggest failure in our logic is that we read much too much
into the term “cutoff frequency” of our filter. Analog filters are characterized by cutoff
frequencies, but the response of the filter does not stop cleanly at the cutoff frequency.
Instead, the term “cutoff frequency” usually means the frequency at which the filter is
attenuating the signal by 3dB. This means that for all but the sharpest of filters there is a
significant amount of filter response “left” outside of a filter’s defined passband.
Since we’re talking about telephone-quality communications, let’s ask what the telephone
guys do. A speech signal such as gets transmitted over a telephone doesn’t have to extend
all theway up to 4kHz. In fact, a good rule of thumb for intelligible speech transmission is
that you needto transmit frequencies up to 3kHz. So let’s continue to sample the system at
8kHz, but let’s only try to keep the components of the audio signal that range in frequency
from 0 to 3kHz. Figure8 on page11 shows the situation with this new sampling rate and
the same 10-pole filter as in Figure7 on page10. This gets us a system with an alias to
signal power ratio of over 16000:1.
So what does this mean?
When you’re designing your anti-alias filter it means that you simply cannot set the cutoff
frequency to the Nyquist rate. Moreover, unless you’re working from a cookbook—and
within that cookbook’s limitations—you can’t set it to any easy “rule of thumb” fraction
of the Nyquist rate. Instead, you’ll need to pay attention to the required precision of the
conversion, and specify your filter accordingly.
Tim Wescott
10
Wescott Design Services
Change font size in fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf fill form; convert word to pdf fillable form online
Change font size in fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
attach file to pdf form; pdf add signature field
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
2 000
4 000
6 000
8 000
1 000
3 000
5 000
7 000
0
1
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.9
frequency, Hz
relative amplitude
Figure 8: Filtering with a lower cutoff.
If you havethefreedom to set the sampling rate, this filtering effect means that you’ll need
to make a trade-off between a low sampling rate and the complexity of your anti-alias
filtering. It is not uncommon for systems to have sampling rates that are seemingly quite
high, just to simplify the task of designing the anti-alias filters
8
.
Nyquist and Signal Content
“I need to monitor the 60Hz power line, so I need to sample at 120Hz.”
“We have a signal at 1kHz we need to detect, so I need to sample at 2kHz.”
Nyquist didn’t say that a signal that repeats N times a second has a bandwidth of N Hertz.
For example, you’re designing a device to monitor a power line and collect statistics about
the quality of the power being delivered. You know that the power grid in North America
operates at 60Hz – this means that you can do an adequate job of monitoring your power
line if you sample at 120Hz, right?
Wrong. Figure9 on page12 shows a snapshot that I collected of the line voltage at my
house. It’s probably typical of the power that you’ll see in North America: it’s nominally
8
In fact, many systems today collect the information at one (high) sampling rate, then perform further
antialias filtering in the digital domain. This allows the data to be further filtered in the digital domain
(where sharp, accurate filters are easy), then sampled (“decimated”) to an even lower sampling rate for
storage or further processing.
Tim Wescott
11
Wescott Design Services
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
create fill pdf form; pdf create fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
convert pdf fillable form; convert pdf to fill in form
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
−20
20
−10
10
−25
−15
−5
5
15
25
0
−200
200
−100
100
−150
−50
50
150
Time, Milliseconds
Voltage
Figure 9: Example power line voltage.
60Hz 117V, but the waveform isn’t a perfect sine wave. Looking at the waveform, you can
see the distortion, with the slightly flattened peaks. It turns out that the waveform shown
has significant harmonic content up to the 5th harmonic (300Hz) if you ignore the “fuzz”
from noise. Moreover, I was having an exceptionally good day as far as power line noise
goes
9
. So for this wave, 120Hz is not the Nyquist rate, and sampling at anything under
600Hz will cause you to miss the detail that was there that day, and even more detail on a
bad day.
But can you catch that 5th harmonic by sampling at 600Hz? Figure10 on page13 shows
two possible results of sampling a 300Hz signal at 600 Hz. The filled diamonds show
what happens if you sample right at the peaks of the signal being sampled, while the open
diamonds show the signal being sampled at it’s zero-crossings. What does this mean? It
means that unless you happen to know the phase of the signal that you’re sampling, you
cannot sample right at the Nyquist rate and get a meaningful answer. In fact, this means
that you couldn’t have sampled a pure 60Hz sine wave at 120Hz!
What is necessaryto samplethis signal? Let’s assume afew things about oursignal, and see
what we need to do to sample it adequately. First, we’ll assume that the only interesting
signal content is at the 5th harmonic and lower. Second we’ll assume that there is no
significant noise or signal above the 5th harmonic. Third, we’ll assume that we want to
make an accurate measurement in just one cycle.
9
Normally, power line noise can extend far, far beyond the 5th harmonic. Had I plugged a lamp dimmer
into the same outlet that I was monitoring, there would have been a huge spike in the waveform at 60 or
120Hz, with harmonics extending up to radio frequencies. Accurate power line measurement is not trivial.
Tim Wescott
12
Wescott Design Services
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
convert pdf to fillable form online; pdf signature field
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
adding a signature to a pdf form; pdf fillable form creator
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
−6
−4
−2
2
4
6
−5
−3
−1
1
3
5
0
−1
1
−0.8
−0.6
−0.4
−0.2
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
time, milliseconds
Figure 10: Sampling at exactly the Nyquist rate.
We know that we can’t sample right at the Nyquist rate, that we have to sample higher. It
turns out that to meet therequirement of sampling in just one cycle of our 60Hz wave, the
minimum frequency that we could sample at would be 660Hz, or the harmonic’s Nyquist
rate plus thereciprocal of ourobservation interval. This rate would catchthe5th harmonic
adequately for mathematicians. Becausewe’re assuming a negligibleamount ofnoise, then
we can conclude that no anti-alias filter is necessary or wanted.
But the sampling would be barely adequate. Sampling at 660Hz would just give you the
bare minimum of information you needed to reconstruct that 300Hz, 5th harmonic signal,
but it would take some work, and you’d have make some strong assumptions about signal
content above 300Hz. A quick look at Figure11 on page14 shows the signal you want to
capture, and what you’d actually get. Moreover, the math would be weird (who wants to
deal with all those factors of 11?). A better rate to use would be 900Hz, or even 1200,
which gives you a 2-times overhead of your 5th harmonic.
Nyquist and Repetitive Signals
“OK Mr. Smarty-pants, I need to monitor the 60Hz power line, so I guess I need
to sample at well over 120Hz.”
Nyquist doesn’t say that a signal that repeats N times a second has a total occupied spec-
trum greater than N Hertz.
Tim Wescott
13
Wescott Design Services
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page
convert pdf file to fillable form online; convert word document to fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET RasterEdge.Imaging. Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; allow users to attach to pdf form
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
−10
10
−8
−6
−4
−2
2
4
6
8
0
−1
1
−0.8
−0.6
−0.4
−0.2
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
time, milliseconds
Figure 11: Barely adequate sampling.
The Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem isn’t always misinterpreted too optimistically.
Sometimes it is misinterpreted too pessimistically. Indeed, there are times when a signal
can be sampled slower—much slower—than a superficial reading of the Nyquist-Shannon
sampling theorem would indicate. This doesn’t happen as often as we’d like, but when
it does you can make significant reductions in your system cost through intelligent use of
sampling.
Let’s look at our power line sampling problem again. Let’s assume that we’re using a really
cost-effective processor, and add the constraint that we can’t sample the wave any faster
than 20Hz. Now what?
If thesignal is at exactly 60Hz, and wesampleit at exactly 20Hz, then we’ll sample a point
in the cycle, then wait two cycles, then sample the same point within the cycle, over and
over again. What to do? Are we doomed? No—if we sample the signal at a frequency
slightly lower than 20Hz, the signal phase within a cycle will advance a little bit with each
new sample. With time, the effect will be a replica of the original signal, only slower.
In fact, you can almost arbitrarily choose how fast you want to sample, and how much
detail you pick up. Let M, P, and N be integers, with M  0, P 6= 0, N > 0, and with P
and N having no common factors. Then we can choose a sampling interval
T
s
=(M +
P
=
N
)
1
F
(8)
where F is the frequency of our repeating signal (60Hz in this case). Doing so, we are
guaranteed that after N samples, we will have sampled N evenly spaced points on the
cycle. The only fly in the ointment is that for P 6= 1 the points will be out of order—but
that’s a problem that’s reparable in software.
Tim Wescott
14
Wescott Design Services
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
0
1
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.9
0
−200
200
−100
100
−150
−50
50
150
time, seconds
line voltage, volts
Figure 12: Example power line signal, sub-sampled.
Notice that (8) can represent “straight” sampling: by choosing M = 0 and P = 1, (8)
becomes T
s
=
1
=
NF
,and we sample N points in each cycle of our parent signal.
If we don’t mind contending with odd frequencies, we can start by choosing N for the
number of samples we want in the waveform, then adjusting M until we get a sampling
rate that’s an appropriate speed for our processor.
For instance, if we choose to sample the 60Hz waveform in Figure9 on page12 at 19Hz,
then we can find that M = 3, P = 3, and N = 19. Thus, we should be able to build up
apicture of the 60Hz power line voltage in 19 samples, or just under one second. The
correct order of the k
th
sample in this sample set will be
n
k
=(kP) modN
(9)
or, for k = [0;1;2;  ;19], the indexes of the reordered vector should be
n
k
=[0;3;6;9;12;15;18;2;5;8;11;14;17;1;4;7;10;13;16]
(10)
Figure12 on page15 shows the waveform in Figure9 on page12 after it’s been sampled
at 19Hz and reordered according to (9). The resulting waveform repeats at slightly less
than 1Hz instead of 60, but it replicates the original waveform as faithfully as sampling it
at 1140Hz (19  60Hz) would have
10
.
How can this work? Why is it that we can apparently violate Nyquist’s rule so thoroughly,
and still get good results? The reason is in the behavior of the power line voltage—it is
10
It is interesting to note that when we are samplingat full speed our samplingrate still adheres to (8)—
just with M = 0 and P = 1.
Tim Wescott
15
Wescott Design Services
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
strictly cyclical, which means that we can count on it repeating over and over again. We’ve
alreadydescribedthis in thetimedomain—how each new sample lands a bit farther ahead
on the cycle where it falls than the previous sample did. If wetry to think about this in the
frequency domain we’re still left with an apparent contradiction, however.
What is happening in the frequency domain is the result of a quirk in the Nyquist-Shannon
sampling theorem, and a matching quirk in the frequency domain behavior of repetitive
signals. These quirks work together to let you sub-sample truly repetitive signals and
build up a picture of the waveform, even if your sampling rate is much lower than the
fundamental frequency of the signal.
Thequirk in the frequency domain is that a steady, repetitive signal has it’s energy concen-
trated in spikes around the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. The more steady
the cyclical waveform is, the narrower these spikes are. So a signal that varies over a span
of a few seconds will have spikes that are around 1Hz wide, while a signal that varies over
aspan of a few minutes will have spikes that are only a small fraction of 1Hz wide.
The quirk in the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem is that the spectrum of the signal
doesn’t have to becontiguous – as long as you can chop it up into unambiguous pieces, you
can spread that Nyquist bandwidth into as many thin little pieces as you want. Sampling
at some frequency that is equal to the repetition rate divided by a prime number will
automatically stack these narrow bits of signal spectrum right up in the same order that
they were in the original signal, only jammed much closer together in frequency – which
is the roundabout frequency-domain way of saying that you can sample at just the right
rate, and interpret the resulting signal as a slowed-down replica of the input waveform.
So in the end, we are taking advantage of these quirks to reconstruct the original wave-
form, even though our sampling is otherwise outrageously slow.
There is a huge caveat to the foregoing approach, however: this approach only works
when the signal is steady, with a known and steady frequency. In the example I’m using
it to analyze the voltage of the North American power grid. This works well because in
North America, as in most of the developed world, you can count on the line frequency to
be rock solid at the local standard frequency. This approach would not work well at all on
any unstable power source, such as one might see out of a portable generator or from a
power line in a less well developed area.
Even in a developed country, this approach has the drawback that it simply will not ac-
curately catch transient events, or rapidly changing line levels. Transient events (such as
someone switching on a hair dryer) havetheir own spectra that adds to theseries of spikes
of the basic power; rapidly changing line levels act to spread out the spikes in the power
spectra, as does changing line frequency. Any of these phenomena can completely destroy
the accuracy of the measurement.
The bottom line is that things aren’t always as black as your reading may paint them—but
you have to interpret your theorem carefully to make sure you don’t fall into a trap.
Nyquist and Band Limited Signals
Tim Wescott
16
Wescott Design Services
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
902.95MHz
903MHz
903.05MHz
9MHz (45/T)
9.05MHz
9.10MHz
0Hz (0/T)
50kHz
100kHz
Figure 13: RF Signal, Translated.
“My radio works at 5MHz, so I have to sample well above 10MHz.”
Nyquist didn’t say that a signal centered around some high frequency has a bandwidth
equal to that frequency. In a manner related to the power line sampling above, one can
sample signals whose spectrum is centered around a frequency significantly higher than
the sampling rate, as long as the signal in question is limited in bandwidth.
As an example, consider a radio receiver that must work with signals with a 50kHz band-
width. A common architecture for such receivers is the superheterodyne, which translates
them to some intermediate frequency in the megahertz region, filters them to the desired
bandwidth, then sample them an adequate rate (200kHz at a minimum, in this case).
For example, consider a data link that generates a signal that is 50kHz wide, centered on
903MHz. This signal gets translated down by exactly 893.95MHz and filtered, so it is now
centered on 9.05MHz and we can trust that there are no significant interfering signals.
Then, the signal gets sampled at exactly 200kHz.
Figure13 on page17 shows how this signal as it occurs in each of the three places above—
only the frequency axis changes. In the original, it is centered on 903MHz (top axis).
Once it is translated down by 893.95MHz, it forms an intermediate frequency (IF) signal
centered on 9.05MHz (middle axis). When this IF signal is sampled
11
at 200kHz the signal
11
If you set out to build a sub-sampled receiver of this type, note that you may have to take on the
responsibility of building the sampler: an ADC that samples at 200kHz may work fine with a signal at
50kHz, but the chip’s internal sample-and-hold circuit may not be good enough to sample accurately at
9MHz.
Tim Wescott
17
Wescott Design Services
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
will alias, and the content at 9.05MHz will show up at 50kHz, with the overall signal
aliased down to a spectrum that runs from approximately 25kHz to 75kHz. This spectrum
is well within the Nyquist rate of 100kHz, and the entire signal is easily encompassed by
the available bandwidth of the sampled-time system.
ADesign Approach
So far in this discussion I have tried my best to destroy some commonly misused rules of
thumb. I haven’t left any rules of thumb in their wake. Why? Because solving problems
in sampling and anti-alias filtering is not amenable to rules of thumb, at least not general
ones. When you’re solving sampling problems you’re best off working from first principals
and solving the problem by analysis.
In designing sampled-time systems, the variables that we need to juggle are signal accu-
racy (or fidelity) and various kinds of system cost (dollar cost, power consumption, size,
etc.). Measured purely from a sample rate perspective, increasing the signal sample rate
will always increase the signal fidelity. It will often decrease the cost of any analog anti-
aliasing and reconstruction filters, but it will always increase the cost of the system digital
hardware, which will not only have to do it’s computations faster, but which will need to
operate on more data. Establishing a system sample rate
12
can be a complex juggling act,
but you can go at it systematically.
In general when I am faced with a decision about sampling rate I try to estimate the min-
imum sampling rate that I will need while keeping my analog electronics within budget,
then estimate the maximum sampling rate I can get away with while keeping the digital
electronics within budget. If all goes well then the analog-imposed minimum sample rate
will be lower than the digital-imposed maximum sample rate. If all doesn’t go well then
Ineed to revisit to my original assumptions about my requirements, or I will need to get
clever about how I implement my system.
Thecommoncriteriaforspecifying a sampled-timesystem’s response to aninputsignal are,
in increasing order of difficulty: that the output signal’s amplitude spectrum should match
the input signal’s spectrum to some desired accuracy over some frequency band; that the
output signal’s time-domain properties should match the input signal’s time-domain prop-
erties to some desired accuracy, but with an allowable time shift; and that the output
signal’s time domain properties should match the input signal to some desired accuracy, in
absolute real time.
Designing for Amplitude Response
In many cases where one is sampling an audio signal one only needs to concern oneself
with the amplitude response of the system over frequency. Indeed, this was the case with
12
When you can—sometimes a system’s sampling rate is determined by circumstances such as asensor or
channelthat has its own naturalsamplingrate. Insuch cases you are reduced to makingsure that the system
willworkat allgiven the limitations,and if it will,how you will make it do so.
Tim Wescott
18
Wescott Design Services
Sampling: What Nyquist Didn’t Say, and What to Do About It
the example presented in the section titled “Nyquist and Filters”, above.
To design to an amplitude response specification you need to determine what range of
frequencies you want to pass through your system, and how much amplitude variation
you can stand from the original (this can vary quite a bit and still be acceptable). Then
you must determinehow much off-frequency signal you can stand being aliased down into
yourdesiredsignal—youcanusuallytake this to be equal to the least-significant bit ofyour
ADC, although you can often allow more, and in rare cases you may need to allow much
less. To determine how much attenuation you need at these off frequencies you must have
an idea of how much signal is there to be filtered out—it is usually conservative to assume
that the entire signal is spectrally flat, and plan your filter accordingly.
Designing for Time-Shape Response
“What is the spectrum of an EKG signal? I want to figure out the Nyquist rate.”
Nyquistdidn’t say that his theorem would findyouthebest solution in allcases. Sometimes
you have to abandon the frequency-domain approach of the Nyquist-Shannon sampling
theorem, and analyze things in the time domain.
For example, there is a problem that arises when one designs for a pure frequency vs.
amplitude response. This problem is that the signal gets distorted in time.
For some applications this matters little, if at all. The human ear is remarkably insensitive
to timedistortions in asignal, as long as the overall frequencycontent gets passedcorrectly.
Audiophiles may argue this point, but certainly for the purposes of verbal communication
and casual home entertainment quite a bit of time distortion is acceptable.
For other applications it is important that the signal, after processing, appear to match the
original signal as closely as possible. This requirement is particularlyacute for applications
that involve vision (human or machine) or that require pattern matching – in these cases
asignal that is distorted in time can be critically wrong.
Figure14 on page20 shows what happens if you pass a rectangular pulse through the
simple Butterworth anti-alias filter that we developed in the telephony example. This
filter’s frequency response is shown in Figure8 on page11. There are two salient things
to note about this response: one, it is considerably delayed in time, and two, it shows
moderately bad ringing. If you were building a system that needed to accurately portray
the shape of a pulse this filter could be a disaster
13
.
The filter in Figure14 on page20 isn’t necessarily entirely as bad as it looks: often when
we are storing information for later display we can absorb any filter delay into the overall
delay of the system. This is shown in Figure15 on page20, where the filter response is
shown artificially shifted back in time. This gives a better looking response and a much
13
If you needed to transmit a pulse with significantly less delay it would be a disaster twice—we’ll cover
that case in alater section.
Tim Wescott
19
Wescott Design Services
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested