c# pdf to image itextsharp : Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf control software system azure windows wpf console wilbur0-part346

Wilbur - HTML 3.2
Table of Contents:
Copyrights & Trademarks 
Web Design Group copyright and trademark information. 
About the Web Design Group 
Who, what, where, when and, most importantly, why. 
Introduction to Wilbur 
The history of the various HTML standards, new tags, and a glance at the future of HTML. 
HTML Basics: Terminology 
A brief overview of basic HTML document concepts and terminology. 
Structure of an HTML document 
A short explanation on how an HTML document is structured, what elements go where, and how to
ensure that your document is valid, accessible and usable for everyone. 
Grouped overview of all tags 
Covers all tags in the Wilbur standard, and provides notes on limitations and proper usage. 
Alphabetical overview of all tags 
Useful as a reference. Be sure to read the syntax rules first. 
The WDG HTML 3.2 Reference 
Descriptions and syntax of the HTML 3.2 elements. 
Appendix A: Glossary 
The WDG's Glossary of Terms. 
Appendix B: Additional Information 
Sources for more information about HTML 3.2. 
Appendix C: ISO 8859-1 character set 
Overview and listing of the ISO 8859-1 (Latin 1) character set. 
Copyright © 1996 Arnoud "Galactus" Engelfriet. 
Converted to Adobe® Acrobat® format by John Blumel. 
Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
auto fill pdf form from excel; convert pdf to fillable form
Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf to fill in form; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
WDG's Copyright and Trademark Information
Except as otherwise indicated any person is hereby authorized to view, copy, print, and distribute this document
subject to the following conditions:
1. The document may be used for informational, non-commercial purposes ONLY. 
2. Any copy of the document or portion thereof must include this copyright notice. 
3. The Web Design Group (hereafter also known as WDG) reserves the right to revoke such authorization
at any time, and any such use shall be discontinued immediately upon written notice from the Web
Design Group or any of its members. 
TRADEMARKS
WDG and all WDG logos and graphics contained within this site are trademarks of the Web Design Group or its
members. All other brand and product names are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of their
respective holders.
Guide for Third Parties Who Use WDG Trademarks
WDG authorizes you or any other reader of this document to include the Web Design Group's logo on any World
Wide Web site, so long as the image is also a link to the WDG's main page located at http://www.htmlhelp.com.
No non-members of the WDG are authorized to display the WDG Member logo. The current list of members can
be found at http://www.htmlhelp.com/about/
Warranties and Disclaimers
THIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. WDG ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ERRORS OR OMISSIONS IN THIS PUBLICATION OR OTHER DOCUMENTS WHICH ARE REFERENCED BY
OR LINKED TO THIS PUBLICATION.
REFERENCES TO CORPORATIONS OR INDIVIDUALS, THEIR SERVICES AND PRODUCTS, ARE PROVIDED
"AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. IN NO EVENT SHALL WDG
BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR
ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THOSE RESULTING FROM LOSS OF
USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER OR NOT ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF DAMAGE, AND ON ANY
THEORY OF LIABILITY, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS
INFORMATION.
THIS PUBLICATION COULD INCLUDE TECHNICAL OR OTHER INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL
ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN; THESE CHANGES WILL
BE INCORPORATED IN NEW EDITIONS OF THE PUBLICATION. WEB DESIGN GROUP MAY MAKE
IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES AT ANY TIME.
Should you or any viewer of this publication respond with information, feedback, data, questions, comments,
suggestions or the like regarding the content of any WDG publication, any such response shall be deemed not
to be confidential and WDG shall be free to reproduce, use, disclose and distribute the response to others
without limitation. You agree that WDG shall be free to use any ideas, concepts or techniques contained in your
response for any purpose whatsoever.
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the United States Government is subject to the restrictions set forth in DFARS
252.227-7013 (c)(1)(ii) and FAR 52.227-19.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
create fillable form from pdf; create a fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
convert word to fillable pdf form; create fill in pdf forms
About the Web Design Group
In the interest of addressing your questions about who makes up the WDG, we have decided to present a short
introduction in the form of a series of Questions and Answers. If you have any other questions, just ask.
What is the WDG? 
The Web Design Group is made up of experienced HTML authors that have banded together in the
hopes of providing guidance and instruction to Web authors at all stages of development. 
Who is in the Web Design Group? 
The members of the web design group are: (in no particular order) 
Arnoud "Galactus" Engelfriet
Ian Butler
John Pozadzides
Liam Quinn
Tina Marie Holmboe
Retired Members include: 
Craig D. Horton
Dave Salovesh
Filip Gieszczykiewicz
Why does the Web Design Group exist? 
The WDG's charter reads as follows: 
The Web Design Group was formed to promote the use of valid and creative HTML
documents. The WDG officially has no preference for browser type, screen resolution,
HTML publishing tool or any other means by which HTML may be incorrectly
manipulated. The WDG's sole interest is in promoting the creation of Non-browser
SpecificNon-resolution SpecificCreative and Informative sites that are Accessible to
ALL users worldwide.
When was the WDG formed? 
The WDG had it's humble beginning on May 25, 1996 with the issuance of invitations into the group by
John Pozadzides. Of the original 10 invited members, four were unable to accept due to extenuating
circumstances. Unfortunately, the two women who were invited both were unable to join, leaving the
group with nothing but men. Despite this shortcoming, the members were able to function enough to
provide all of the information available on this site until Tina Marie accepted the WDG's invitation to join
on December 22, 1996. 
Where is the WDG located? 
The members of the WDG reside on a virtual planet known as CyberSpace. Their physical bodies are
however trapped in different countries on Earth. 
How do they do that? 
It ain't easy... 
What are "they" saying about HTMLHelp.com? 
Just look and see at http://www.htmlhelp.com/about/awards.html
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
create fillable pdf form from word; create a pdf form that can be filled out
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert pdf form fillable; convert pdf fillable form to word
Introduction to Wilbur
Until recently, the latest "official" HTML version was HTML 2.0, as specified in RFC 1866. It served its purpose
very well, but many HTML authors wanted more control over their document and more ways to mark up their text
and enhance the appearance of their sites. 
HTML 3.0
Netscape, being the leading browser at that time, introduced new tags and attributes with every new version.
Other browsers tried to duplicate them, but as Netscape never fully specified their new tags, this didn't always
work as expected. It led to great confusion and problems when authors used these elements and then saw they
didn't work as expected in another browser. 
At about the same time, the IETF's HTML working group lead by Dave Raggett introduced the HTML 3.0 draft,
which included many new and very useful enhancements to HTML. Most browsers only implemented a small
subset of the elements from this draft. The phrase "HTML 3.0 enhanced" quickly became popular on the Web,
even though it more often than not referred to documents containing browser-specific tags, rather than
documents adhering to the HTML 3.0 draft. This was one of the reasons why the draft was abandoned. 
As more and more browser-specific tags were introduced, it became obvious a new standard was needed. For
this reason, the W3C drafted the Wilbur standard, which later became known as HTML 3.2. As they put it
themselves: (in the document type definition, the formal specification) 
HTML 3.2 aims to capture recommended practice as of early '96 and as such to be used as a
replacement for HTML 2.0 (RFC 1866). Widely deployed rendering attributes are included
where they have been shown to be interoperable. SCRIPT and STYLE are included to smooth
the introduction of client-side scripts and style sheets. Browsers must avoid showing the
contents of these element. Otherwise support for them is not required. 
Most of the extensions to HTML, as introduced by the various browser developers, were not specified as
thoroughly as the HTML 2.0 specs do for the standard elements. This meant that the W3C had to "reverse
engineer" the correct functionality for the extensions which were chosen for HTML 3.2. Since HTML 3.2 is
defined in terms of SGML, some elements had to be defined slightly differently to make them legal. 
The future of HTML: Cougar
HTML 3.2 is an attempt to write down what current browsers support or should support. This will hopefully ensure
that a document which is written for Wilbur will be rendered in an acceptable way by all current browsers. 
The next version of HTML, which is code-named Cougar, will introduce new functionality, most of which comes
from the now-expired HTML 3.0 draft. Some of the elements from Wilbur already hint at what can be expected.
For example, the SCRIPT and STYLE elements will be used in the future to allow inclusion of inline scripts and
style sheets, although currently a browser does not have to support them. It only has to hide the contents of the
tags. 
As it's still very early, not many details about Cougar are available yet. You can get a preview of what's to be
expected from the Cougar DTD, which can be found at at
http://www.w3.org/pub/WWW/MarkUp/Cougar/HTML.dtd. Cougar will introduce full style sheet support. This will
allow authors to assign a style to a document easily, while keeping the HTML for its intended purpose: marking
up the content of the document. It will also have better support for international documents. 
Note
One of the reasons that HTML 3.0 didn't make it, was that it was so big. Because of this, future versions of
HTML will be introduced in a modular way, so browsers can easily implement them bit by bit. An example of this
approach is RFC 1942, which describes a very extensive implementation of HTML TABLEs. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; convert pdf to fill in form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
create fillable form from pdf; pdf fillable form
HTML Basics: Terminology
Tags, content and presentation
In its most basic form, an HTML document consists of text, enclosed in tags. These tags (more accurately, these
elements) describe the meaning of the text they contain, rather than how the enclosed text should be displayed.
This concept is called content-based markup, as opposed to presentational markup. 
Content-based markup allows device independence; knowing the meaning of a piece of text allows a browser to
render it as good as possible on the platform it is running on. With presentational markup this is impossible.
Without knowing why a string of text must be displayed in red 20 points Helvetica, you can't pick a good
alternative way to display it on a screen where this font isn't available. 
Using tags
An element, when used in a document, consists of an opening and a closing tag. The closing tag is not always
used. It might be optional, or even forbidden. The group of elemens which have opening and closing tags are
referred to as container elements, and the group of elements without closing tag as empty elements. Container
tags may not overlap each other. Always close the innermost container first, if you are nesting them. 
An opening tag can have certain attributes. These provide extra information about the tag and the text they
enclose, if any. For example, the A tag has an HREF attribute which defines where the anchored text is a link to. 
The attribute may have a value, although this is not necessary in all cases. If it has a value, it is specified in the
"
na
m
e
=
va
l
ue
" form. The value must be enclosed in quotes if it contains anything more than letters, digits,
hyphens and/or periods. In all other cases, quoting is optional. The maximum length for an attribute value is
1024 characters, including the quotation marks (if used). 
The generic structure
The document can be divided in two parts, the head and the body. The document head provides information
about the document, for example its title, the author and a short description. The document body holds the
actual contents of the document. 
Building the body - blocks
The document body is built up with so-called block elements or block-level tags. A block element marks up a
section of text and assigns it a particular meaning. For example, you can indicate that a section of text is a
heading, a large quotation or an item in a list. There are also block elements which may only contain other block
elements and no text. These elements include lists (which may only contain list items) and tables (which may
only contain table rows full of cells). Some block elements may contain other block elements, instead of only text.
These are sometimes referred to as super-block elements
Block elements which may not contain text are used to hold certain block elements together, so they form a
logical unity. A list is a good example of this; it groups all the list items inside together, so the browser knows the
items are part of the same list. A slightly more complex example is the table. An HTML table is built up by rows of
cells, and the table tag itself contains an optional caption, followed by one or more rows. The rows may only
contain header or data cells, and the cells themselves may contain almost every element. 
Special cases
super-block element assigns a meaning to a set of block elements. The division tag, DIV, is probably the best
example. It can be used to set a default alignment or style attributes for all the block elements it contains. This is
easier to do than setting that property for each block element inside. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
allow users to attach to pdf form; create a pdf form to fill out
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
create fillable form pdf online; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
A special case is the preformatted text container. It is the only container in which linebreaks and spacing is used
exactly as how it appears inside the source. This is very useful if you are inserting ASCII art, or text which requires
a specific layout and spacing, for example the source for a program. 
Text - adding the contents
Inside the block elements, the actual text is found. This text should be written only with characters in the ISO
Latin 1 character set. In HTML, spaces and newlines are considered identical. They are referred to as
whitespace, and if multiple whitespace elements are used in sequence, the browser should display only one
whitespace element. 
Depending on the block, the text inside it may also be marked up. In general, the text-level tags used for this
can be divided into three categories: 
Appearance (font tags), which change the appearance of the text. 
Logical (phrase tags) which assign text a particular meaning. 
Special tags, which assign text a particular functionality. 
Appearance/font tags
Font tags are used to change the appearance of the text. This includes font size changes, boldface, italics and
super/subscript. However, if a browser can't perform the appearance change, it has no good way to determine a
good alternative. As said above, without knowing why this font change should be performed, the browser can't
pick another way to display/process the text. A search engine can't know something in italics is a book title unless
you tell it. 
This limitation can cause problems if your document depends on this appearance change. There is no
guarantee or requirement that a browser will display a font tag in the way the name suggests. 
Logical markup
It's not always necessary to use a font tag. Often the change in appearance is an attempt to assign a special
meaning to the text. For example, italics is often used for citations or emphasized text. In these cases, a better
approach is to use a logical tag  to indicate this meaning. The browser can now pick the best way to display that
kind of text on the screen. 
For example, if the browser does not support italics, it can still display citations and emphasized text correctly,
although probably in a different fashion. 
Special markup
The third category, special tags, does assign meaning or appearance change to text, but functionality instead.
The most common example is the hyperlink, which assigns a connection to another document to the enclosed
text. Inline images also fall in this category. 
Strangely enough, the Wilbur specification also include the FONT tag in this group, although it is clearly an
appearance tag. The three building blocks for HTML forms (INPUT, TEXTAREA and SELECT) are also text-level
tags, and can be grouped in the "Special" category. 
A final note
In almost all cases, you can use each text-level tag inside another one, even when this doesn't make sense.
There is no way to prevent this in the specification, so it's up to the author to use only meaningful constructs. If a
meaningless construct is used (such as, for example, 
<E
M
><
I
NPUT
TYPE=
rad
i
o
NA
M
E=
f
oo
><
/
E
M
>
), you can
get unexpected results if a browser tries to render it. 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
add fillable fields to pdf online; convert word document to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
change font in pdf fillable form; convert pdf to form fillable
The structure of an HTML 3.2 document
Writing a structured document does not mean that you are writing in a straitjacket. It only means you have to lay
out the document in advance. It also means the document becomes easier to read, maintain and extend. While
this may not seem too important if you just want a homepage, when you have a whole site to maintain,
well-structured documents make life a lot easier! 
It is also important to note that HTML uses the ISO-8859-1 character set. Apart from the entities defined in the
Wilbur draft, the characters from this list are the only ones you should use. Other characters are not guaranteed
to show up at all in a browser, let alone show up as the character you're hoping for. 
Every HTML 3.2 compliant document should look basically as follows:
(Note: the line numbers are only here for the explanation below) 
1
.  
<
!
DOCTYPE
HT
M
L
PUBL
I
C
"-//
W3
C
//
DTD
HT
M
L
3
.
2
//
EN
"
>
2
.  
<HT
M
L>
3
.  
<HEAD>
4
.  
<T
I
TLE>T
he
 titl
e
o
f t
he
docu
m
en
ts
<
/
T
I
TLE>
5
.  
<
M
ETA
NA
M
E=
"descri
p
ti
on"
CONTENT=
"
T
h
is
 is
a
docu
m
en
t"
>
6
.  
<L
I
NK
REV=
"
m
ade"
HREF=
"
m
a
ilt
o
:
ga
l
ac
t
us@h
t
m
l
he
l
p
.
co
m
"
>
7
.  
<
/
HEAD>
8
.  
<BODY>
9
.  ... 
docu
m
en
body
10
.  
<
/
BODY>
11
.  
<
/
HT
M
L>
1. DOCTYPE
This is a so-called DOCTYPE declaration. It is used by SGML tools to detect what kind of document is being
processed. If your document adheres to the Wilbur standard, the above is what it should look like. 
If your document is HTML 2.0 compliant, the DOCTYPE of it is 
<
!
DOCTYPE
HT
M
L
PUBL
I
C
"-//I
ETF
//
DTD
HT
M
L
2
.
0
//
EN
"
>
Some HTML editors like to include an arbitrary DOCTYPE declaration in your documents, even when it is not
correct. Note that in particular, any doctype for HTML 3.0 is not an "official" declaration, since that proposal has
been expired for a long time now. 
2. HTML
This tag goes around the entire document. Basically, it states that the rest is all HTML, as opposed to some
other language which may use tags within < and > brackets. In theory, it can also be used by servers to see that
the document they want to send is actually HTML and not plain text. However, this is almost never done (for
performance reasons, usually). 
3. HEAD
The head of your document contains information about the document itself. Nothing within the HEAD section
should be displayed in the document window. The head section must include the TITLE of the document. It can
optionally contain things like a description, a list of keywords for search engines, and the name of the program
used to create the HTML document. 
The HEAD tag is optional. If you arrange all the information about the document at the top of the document, and
all body tags below, it is obvious for a parser where the header ends and where the body begins. 
4. TITLE
The TITLE tag is the only required tag for the head section. It is typically displayed in the browser's window title
bar, and used in bookmark files and search engine result listings. For the last two situations, you should make
sure the title is descriptive for the document - "Homepage" or "Index" doesn't say much in a bookmark file. 
5. META
META tags provide "meta information" about the document. For example, it can give a description of the
document, indicate when the document will have expired or what program was used to generate it. There are
many possible META constructs, so please read the section on meta tags in the list of HTML tags
This particular META tag provides a description of the document, which is used by search engines such as Alta
Vista and Infoseek
6. LINK
A LINK tag provides information about the document relative to the rest of the site. For example, you can have a
LINK tag stating where the table of contents is, what the next document is or where the style sheet can be
found. 
This particular LINK tag gives the address of the document's author. Some browsers (most notably Lynx) allow
you to send a comment to this person with one keystroke if this tag is defined. 
9. BODY
The BODY of the document contains the actual information. There may be only one BODY statement in the
document. Some editors incorrectly insert another BODY statement for each new attribute you want to add to
the body, but this can have unexpected side-effects (such as some of the attributes getting ignored completely). 
Designing a structured contents for your HTML document is an art in itself. I won't go into it too deeply here.
Initially, use only the six headers to set up the structure of the document, adding lists, tables and other block
elements until the general layout of the document is finished. Then begin filling in the blocks, marking up the text
with the appropriate text-level elements. Images are very important, but as the IMG tag is a text-level tag, it must
be contained in a block-level tag. 
Often a document will be part of a set, so it will use a common style. This style should specify a standard
structure for documents, including navigation aids and standard images. Writing a template is then a very handy
thing. The WDG's Style guide for online hypertext discusses this in more detail. 
For more information about using the various HTML elements, see the HTML Basics series. 
Grouped overview of HTML elements
As explained in the section on structure of Wilbur documents, an HTML document consists of two major
sections: HEAD and BODY. Each has its own permitted elements and requirements. 
The elements themselves can also have requirements about where they may occur, and which elements may
occur inside them. This is only important in the BODY section of a document. In here, elements can be grouped
in two distinct groups: block level and text level elements. The former make up the document's structure, and
the latter "dress up" the contents of a block. This terminology is explained in more detail in the HTML Basics
series. 
The HTML comment is a special case. 
Elements for the HEAD section
The HEAD section of a document may only contain the following elements. If any other elements, or plain text,
occurs inside the HEAD section, the browser should assume the HEAD ends here, and start rendering the
BODY. See the syntax rules for an explanation of the syntax used in the overview. 
TITLE - Document title 
ISINDEX - Primitive search 
META - Meta-information 
LINK - Site structure 
BASE - Document location 
SCRIPT - Inline script 
STYLE - Style information 
Elements for the BODY section
Block-level elements
The BODY of a document consists of multiple block elements. If plain text is found inside the body, it is assumed
to be inside a paragraph P. See the syntax rules for an explanation of the syntax used in the overview. 
Headings 
H1 - Level 1 header 
H2 - Level 2 header 
H3 - Level 3 header 
H4 - Level 4 header 
H5 - Level 5 header 
H6 - Level 6 header 
Lists 
UL - Unordered list 
OL - Ordered list 
DIR - Directory list 
MENU - Menu item list 
LI - List item 
DL - Definition list 
DT - Definition term 
DD- Definition 
Text containers 
P - Paragraph 
PRE - Preformatted text 
BLOCKQUOTE - Large quotation 
ADDRESS - Address information 
Others 
DIV - Logical division 
CENTER - Centered division 
FORM - Input form 
HR - Horizontal rule 
TABLE - Tables 
Text-level elements
These elements are used to mark up text inside block level elements. Some block level elements exclude certain
text level elements, and some text level elements may only appear inside specific block level elements. This is
documented in the section on that block level element.
See the syntax rules for an explanation of the syntax used in the overview. 
Logical markup 
EM - Emphasized text 
STRONG - Strongly emphasized 
DFN - Definition of a term 
CODE - Code fragment 
SAMP - Sample text 
KBD - Keyboard input 
VAR - Variable 
CITE - Short citation 
Physical markup 
TT - Teletype 
I - Italics 
B - Bold 
U - Underline 
STRIKE - Strikeout 
BIG - Larger text 
SMALL - Smaller text 
SUB - Subscript 
SUP - Superscript 
Special markup 
A - Anchor 
BASEFONT - Default font size 
IMG - Image 
APPLET - Java applet 
PARAM - Parameters for Java applet 
FONT - Font modification 
BR - Line break 
MAP - Client-side imagemap 
AREA - Hotzone in imagemap 
Forms 
INPUT - Input field, button, etc. 
SELECT - Selection list 
OPTION - Selection list option 
TEXTAREA - Input area 
Tables 
CAPTION - Table caption 
TR - Table row 
TH - Header cell 
TD - Table cell 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested